URGENT! – Health Alert – Canine Cough in the Community

July 27th, 2018 – There appears to be a strain of canine cough in the community. We have received reports of at least two dogs that are exhibiting the symptoms of canine cough. In both cases, the dogs were current on their Bordetella vaccine, which suggests that the vaccination does not offer immunity to this particular strain of canine cough.

While the number of dogs that have shown symptoms and have been diagnosed is small compared to those that are symptom and disease free, we want to be sure that you are aware of the situation.

At Green Acres Kennel Shop we do require that dogs that board or daycare with us, or that are enrolled in a training class, be current on a canine cough vaccine as administered by their veterinarian, or canine cough nosodes as prescribed and provided by the veterinarian. Not all boarding and daycare facilities require canine cough preventatives.

Canine cough or kennel cough are lay terms for Canine Infectious Respiratory Disease Complex (CIRDC), which is highly contagious to other dogs, much like the common cold is with people. Canine cough can be transmitted through the air from one dog to the next or by contact with contaminated objects such as a common water dish at the dog park or in front of a dog-friendly store. Like the common cold is to humans, canine cough is not typically serious, but if you see symptoms in your dog (coughing, gagging, vomiting, or general lethargy) I would recommend that you call your veterinarian.

For More Information on canine cough < click here >

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URGENT! – HEALTH ALERT – Don’t Feed Nut Butters to Dogs Without First Checking for Xylitol!

URGENT! – HEALTH ALERT – Don’t Feed Nut Butters to Dogs Without First Checking for Xylitol!
Beware of Xylitol 800x800Not until you read the label, and even then – consider all the facts:
Many people think that xylitol is an artificial sweetener, but it’s not, and that’s actually a problem in so far as understanding a label. Due to it being a natural part of fruits and veggies, it might be listed as “natural sweetener“, or “sweetened naturally
Some nut butters (not just peanut butter) have changed to include xylitol, a natural alcohol sweetener. Xylitol is poisonous to dogs, causing liver failure and dangerously low blood sugar.
Note: Not all natural alcohol sweeteners are a health risk for dogs, but if all the label states is “sugar alcohol” without stating which one, you’ll want to keep it away from dogs.

Thank you to Monica Segal of monicasegal.com for sharing

URGENT! – Keep Your Pets Safe on the 4th of July-Act Today, Do NOT Delay!

If your dog gets anxious and nervous at the sound of fireworks, start planning now on how you will keep them safe and how you will minimize their anxiety. If you live in an area where others set off fireworks, have a conversation with those people now. Politely explain how distressing fireworks are to your pets. Ask them to either refrain from using fireworks or to at least keep their use to a minimum, at times you are not home. If you cannot reach an agreement, make sure you have the phone number of the local authorities on speed dial and do not hesitate to make a complaint. Talk to your veterinarian about anti-anxiety medications you may use to help your pet. Over the counter products such as Bach Rescue Remedy, ComfortZone Dog Appeasing Pheromone, endocannabinoid based products specifically for pets and certain essential oils, such as Lavender, may also be helpful.



According to the American Humane Association:

  • 10 million pets get lost every year. This is more than the population of New York City.
  • Of the dogs entering shelters, approximately 35% are adopted, 31% are euthanized and 26% are returned to their owner.
  • Without proper ID or micro-chipping, 90% of lost pets never return home.
  • A third of pets will get lost in their lifetime.
  • An estimated 2 million pets are stolen each year.

To prevent your dog from becoming lost on the 4th of July:4th of July Dogs Lost 400x400

  • Keep your dog on leash unless they are inside or in a fenced yard.
  • If you have guests in your home, make sure everyone is careful so as not to accidentally let the dog out.
  • Do NOT take your dog to the fireworks. They are not going to enjoy the experience and may become frightened and run off.
  • If you choose to use fireworks at your home or camp, or if you have neighbors that do so, make sure that your dog is inside, preferably in a room where they will not hear or see the fireworks.

To give your pet the best chance of being returned to you:

  • Please make sure that your dog is either micro-chipped or wearing a collar with a current, readable and legible ID tag.
  • If your dog is micro-chipped, make sure that the chip registry has your current contact information.
  • Keep a current photo of your pet that you can use on a “Lost Pet” poster if your pet goes missing. Make sure it’s a good photo that clearly shows any identifying characteristics of your dog.
  • Maintain a list of phone numbers for your local animal control organization, police department, animal shelter(s), and pet related businesses so that you can notify them if your pet is lost and ask them to put up the “Lost Pet” poster that you create.
  • If your dog is micro-chipped, contact the chip registry if they go missing. Many registries will help disseminate information about your missing dog on social media to aid in recovery.
  • If you live in Maine, contact Maine Lost Dog Recovery via their Facebook page ( https://www.facebook.com/MaineLostDogRecovery ) as they can be very helpful in assisting you in getting the word out about your lost dog.
  • If you are traveling with your pet, provide your pet with a temporary ID tag that provides local contact information for wherever you are staying.

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