Podcast – The Eastern Area Agency on Aging Furry Friends Food Bank and Green Acres’ 2020 Annual Fundraiser

< Short Link to this page – https://bit.ly/FFFB-2020 >

< Click to Listen to Podcast >

In this episode of The Woof Meow Show from November 28th, 2020, Don talks with Kelly Adams and Mike Trafton from the Eastern Area Agency on Aging about Green Acres Kennel Shop and The Woof Meow Show’s 13th annual fundraiser for the EAAA Furry Friends Food Bank. Tune in, and you can learn all about the role of the Eastern Area Agency on Aging, the people they help, and how you can help keep senior citizens and their pets together.

Click here to donate to the Furry Friends Food Bank –  https://www.greenacres-donate.com

Click here to learn more about the Eastern Area Agency on Aging – https://www.eaaa.org/

Click here to learn more about the EAAA Furry Friends Food Bank – https://www.eaaa.org/furry-friends-food-bank/

Click here to go to the Friends of the Furry Friends Food Bank Facebook page – https://www.facebook.com/GAKS.FFFFB/

You can listen to The Woof Meow Show on Z62 Retro Radio, AM620, and WKIT HD3 at 9 AM on Saturday. If you are not near a radio, listen on your computer at http://bit.ly/AM620-WZON or your smartphone or tablet with the free WZON 620 AM app. A podcast of the show is typically posted immediately after the show. You can download this show and others at http://bit.ly/WfMwPodcasts, at Don’s blog http://bit.ly/Words-Woofs-Meows and the Apple podcast app.

< Click to Listen to Podcast >

Contact Info

Friends of the EAAA Furry Friends Food Bank

Website: https://www.greenacres-donate.com
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GAKS.FFFFB/

Eastern Area Agency on Aging

Phone: 207-941-2865
Address: Main Office – 240 State St., (Twin City Plaza) Brewer, ME
Website: https://www.eaaa.org/ & https://www.eaaa.org/furry-friends-food-bank/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/easternaaa/

Green Acres Kennel Shop & The Woof Meow Show

Phone: 207-945-6841
Address: 1653 Union St., Bangor, ME
Website: www.greenacreskennel.com & www.woofmeowshow.com
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GreenAcresKennelShop/ & https://www.facebook.com/WoofMeowShow/

 

©28NOV20, Donald J. Hanson, All Rights Reserved
< Click for Copyright and Use Policy >

Pets in the News No. 7

< Click to Listen to Podcast >

< Updated 18JAN19 >

< A short link for this page – http://bit.ly/WfMw-PetNews7 >

In this episode of The Woof Meow Show from January 18th, 2020 Kate and Don discuss several recent articles in the news about dogs and cats. The topics they discuss include; Dogs and Love, how attending puppy classes benefits the future behavior of your adult dog, cat litter and how to make a choice that is good for you and your cat, dogs and real bones for chewing.

Links to Articles from the Show

Dogs Can’t Help Falling in Love, The New York Times, James Gorman, Nov. 22, 2019 – https://www.nytimes.com/2019/11/22/science/dogs-love-evolution.html

Association between puppy classes and adulthood behavior of the dog, Journal of Veterinary Behavior, Volume 32, July-August 2019 – https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S1558787817302551

The Best Way to Choose the Right Litter for Your Cat, Dr. Karen Becker, November 26, 2019 – https://healthypets.mercola.com/sites/healthypets/archive/2019/11/26/how-to-choose-a-litter-box.aspx

Should You Give Bones to Your Dog? Depends on Your Dog, Dr. Karen Becker, October 2, 2019 – https://healthypets.mercola.com/sites/healthypets/archive/2019/10/02/dog-bones-for-dental-health.aspx

Feeding Raw Meaty Bones As Part of a Raw Diet, Whole Dog Journal, April 29, 2019, – https://www.whole-dog-journal.com/food/feeding-your-dog-a-raw-diet/

You can listen to The Woof Meow Show on Z62 Retro Radio, AM620, and WKIT HD3 at 9 AM on Saturday. If you are not near a radio, listen on your computer at http://bit.ly/AM620-WZON or your smartphone or tablet with the free WZON 620 AM app. A podcast of the show is typically posted immediately after the show. You can download this show and others at http://bit.ly/WfMwPodcasts, at Don’s blog http://bit.ly/Words-Woofs-Meows and the Apple Podcast app.

Contact Info for The Woof Meow Show

Address: 1653 Union St., Bangor, ME 04401
Phone: 207-945-6841, x103
Upcoming Shows: http://bit.ly/WfMwUpcomingShows
Website: www.woofmeowshow.com
Don’s Blog: http://bit.ly/Words-Woofs-Meows
Podcast Site: http://bit.ly/WfMwPodcasts
Live Stream: http://bit.ly/AM620-WZON
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/WoofMeowShow/

©18JAN20, Donald J. Hanson, All Rights Reserved

< Click for Copyright and Use Policy >

Podcast – Introducing Dr. Christine Calder, Maine’s 1st Veterinary Behaviorist

< Click to Listen to Podcast >

< Updated 24MAY20 >

< A short link for this page – http://bit.ly/WMw-DrCalderVetBhx >

In this episode of The Woof Meow Show from January 11th, 2020 Kate and Don interview Dr. Christine Calder, Maine’s first and currently only veterinary behaviorist. Dr. Calder is one of only 86 veterinary behaviorists in North America so we are lucky to have her here in Maine. Behavior problems are the second biggest reason that someone takes their pet to the veterinarian other than for an annual wellness exam. Unfortunately, veterinarians get very little education on behavior while in, so having a veterinarian that also has expertise in animal behavior has the potential to greatly benefit Maine’s pets. Behavioral health is as important to the quality of life for our pets as their physical health, and behavior is often the first indicator that our pets give when they are not feeling well. If you are a pet parent, pet care professional, or general practice veterinarian, you will not want to miss this show.

We discuss why and when Dr. Calder decided she wanted to become a veterinarian, where she went to school, and what her education as a veterinarian entailed. We talk about her career as a general practice veterinarian and when and why she decided to specialize in behavior. Dr. Calder shares the rigorous process she had to complete to become accredited by the American College of Veterinary Behaviorists (ACVB). Don asks Dr. Calder about the 2015 AAHA Canine and Feline Behavior Management Guidelines and the findings reported. We discuss changes that need to occur in veterinary schools and the veterinary community to improve behavioral health for our pets.

Dr. Calder discusses her practice at the Maine Veterinary Medical Center in Scarborough and explains how pet parents, trainers and behavior consultants, and general practice veterinarians can contact and work with her to treat pets behavioral disorders. [ In the spring of 2020 Dr. Calder moved her practice to Midcoast Humane in Brunswick.] Lastly, we list the most common behavioral issues in both cats and dogs.

Contact Info for Dr. Calder

Facility: Midcoast Humane
Address: 190 Pleasant Street, Brunswick, ME
Phone: (207) 449-1366
Website: https://midcoasthumane.org/
Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/Christine-Calder-DVM-DACVB-Veterinary-Behaviorist-104864721012254/

More info on Dr. Calder from the January 2020 issue of Downeast Dog Newshttps://downeastdognews.villagesoup.com/p/what-is-a-veterinary-behaviorist/1846547

You can hear The Woof Meow Show on Z62 Retro Radio, AM620, and WKIT HD3 at 9 AM on Saturday. If you are not near a radio, listen on your computer at http://bit.ly/AM620-WZON or your smartphone or tablet with the free WZON 620 AM app. A podcast of the show is typically posted immediately after the show. You can download this show and others at http://woofmeowshow.libsyn.com/ , at Don’s blog http://bit.ly/Words-Woofs-Meows and the Apple podcast app.

< Click to Listen to Podcast >

Recommended Resources

Articles on Don’s Blog ( http://www.words-woofs-meows.com )

Do I Need a Dog Trainer or a “Behaviorist”?http://bit.ly/WWM-Trainer-Behaviorist

©24MAY20, Donald J. Hanson, All Rights Reserved

< Click for Copyright and Use Policy >

Podcast – Pets in the News No. 6

< Click to Listen to Podcast >

< Updated 03JAN20 >

< A short link for this page – http://bit.ly/2WfMw-PetNews6 >

 

In this episode of The Woof Meow Show from January 4th, 2020 Kate and Don discuss several recent articles in the news about dogs and cats. The topics they discuss include; the effect of vaping on our pets and the dangers it presents, cat aggression and what to do if your cat is a biter, and how to help your chubby cat lose weight.

You can hear The Woof Meow Show on Z62 Retro Radio, AM620, and WKIT HD3 at 9 AM on Saturday. If you are not near a radio, listen on your computer at http://bit.ly/AM620-WZON or your smartphone or tablet with the free WZON 620 AM app. A podcast of the show is typically posted immediately after the show. You can download this show and others at http://bit.ly/WfMwPodcasts, at Don’s blog http://bit.ly/Words-Woofs-Meows and the Apple Podcast app.

.

Contact Info for The Woof Meow Show

Address: 1653 Union St., Bangor, ME 04401

Phone: 207-945-6841, x103

Upcoming Shows: http://bit.ly/WfMwUpcomingShows
Don’s Blog: http://bit.ly/Words-Woofs-Meows
Podcast Site: http://bit.ly/WfMwPodcasts 
Live Stream: http://bit.ly/AM620-WZON 
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/WoofMeowShow/

Links to Articles from the Show

The Little-Known Side Effects of Vaping on Pets, Dr. Karen Becker – https://healthypets.mercola.com/sites/healthypets/archive/2019/12/07/liquid-nicotine-poisoning-pets.aspx

From Lap Cat to Wildcat – What to Do When Your Cat Bites, Dr. Karen Becker – https://healthypets.mercola.com/sites/healthypets/archive/2019/12/03/how-to-stop-your-cat-from-biting.aspx

The Worst – and Best – Way to Feed A Chunky Kitty, Dr. Karen Becker – https://healthypets.mercola.com/sites/healthypets/archive/2019/11/12/how-to-reduce-cat-size.aspx

 

©04JAN20, Donald J. Hanson, All Rights Reserved

< Click for Copyright and Use Policy >

 

Podcast – Holiday Gift Ideas for Pets and Their People-2019 – 30NOV19

< Click to Listen to Podcast >

< Updated 30NOV19 >

< A short link for this page – http://bit.ly/WfMw-HolidayGifts2019 >

In this episode of The Woof Meow Show from November 30th, 2019, Kate and Don offer suggestions on things you can give your pet and yourself that they believe will greatly benefit the relationship between the two of you. They are not promoting products, nor are they discussing things that you need to purchase. Don and Kate’s suggestions include several gift ideas that you can use throughout the year during your pet’s life. Tune in and learn how these simple concepts can nurture your relationship with your furry companion. Specifically, they discuss the gifts of patience, knowledge, focusing on behavior we like, and giving our pets an opportunity to have a choice when it comes to giving their consent.

There is a companion piece to this podcast on Don’s blog, based on his December Words, Woofs, and Meows column in the Downeast Dog News. You can read that at  http://bit.ly/WWM-HolidayGifts2019

You can hear The Woof Meow Show on Z62 Retro Radio, AM620, and WKIT HD3 at 9 AM on Saturday. If you are not near a radio, listen on your computer at http://bit.ly/AM620-WZON or your smartphone or tablet with the free WZON 620 AM app. A podcast of the show is typically posted immediately after the show. You can download this show and others at http://woofmeowshow.libsyn.com/ , at Don’s blog http://bit.ly/Words-Woofs-Meows and the Apple iTunes store.

< Click to Listen to Podcast >

Recommended Resources

Articles on Don’s Blog ( http://www.words-woofs-meows.com )

Shared Blog Post from Nancy Tanner – The misunderstanding of time by Nancy Tanner – http://bit.ly/Patience-Dogs

Maine Pet Care Professionals That We Recommend  http://bit.ly/MEPetPros

Recommended Resources for People with Pets http://bit.ly/KnowledgeforPetParents

Shared Blog Post from Jenny Efimova What My Dog Taught Me About Consenthttp://bit.ly/Dog-Consent

 

©30NOV19, Donald J. Hanson, All Rights Reserved

< Click for Copyright and Use Policy >

 

Podcast – Dental Care for Pets 2019 with Dr. Katie Carter – 26JAN19

< A Short Link to this page – http://bit.ly/WfMw-PetDental2019 >

< Click to Listen to Podcast >

In this episode of The Woof Meow Show from January 26th, 2019 Don interviews Dr. Katie Carter from River Road Veterinary Hospital about pet dental care and the importance of preventing and treating periodontal disease in your pet. Chronic inflammation or an infection in your pet’s mouth, gingivitis, is every bit as serious as an infection anywhere else. When left untreated, periodontal disease can spread bacteria to the liver, the kidneys, the heart, and even the nervous system.

During the show, Dr. Carter describes a typical dental exam and the teeth cleaning process. She explains why a dental for our pets is done under general anesthesia and the many steps a veterinarian takes to make sure that process is as safe as possible for every pet. We also discuss preventative care for dental health and breeds that are more susceptible to periodontal disease.

Learn how you can improve your pet’s life by taking care of their mouth!

You can hear The Woof Meow Show on Z62 Retro Radio, AM620, and WKIT HD3 at 9 AM on Saturday. If you are not near a radio, listen on your computer at http://bit.ly/AM620-WZON or your smartphone or tablet with the free WZON 620 AM app. A podcast of the show is typically posted immediately after the show. You can download this show and others at http://woofmeowshow.libsyn.com/ at Don’s blog  http://bit.ly/Words-Woofs-Meows and the Apple iTunes store.

< Click to Listen to Podcast >

Contact Info for Dr. Carter

Dr. Katie Carter
River Road Veterinary Hospital
210 River Road, Orrington, ME 04416

(207) 825-2105

http://riverroadvet.com/

https://www.facebook.com/riverroadvet/

 

Recommended Resources

Articles on Don’s Blog ( http://www.words-woofs-meows.com )

Health & Wellness – Pet Dental Care – < Click to Read >

Products We Recommend – ProDen PlaqueOff® –- < Click to Read >

Podcasts from The Woof Meow Show
( http://www.woofmeowshow.com )

Podcast – Pet Dental Care with Dr. Katie Carter from River Road Veterinary Hospital – 2017< Click >

Introducing Dr. Katie Carter from River Road Veterinary Hospital – < Click >

 

©4FEB19, Donald J. Hanson, All Rights Reserved
< Click for Copyright and Use Policy >

Podcast – The Eastern Area Agency on Aging Furry Friends Food Bank and Green Acres’ 2018 Annual Fundraiser

< Click to Listen to Podcast >

In this episode of The Woof Meow Show from November 17th, 2018, Kate and Don talk with Kelly Adams and Mike Trafton about the work of the Eastern Area Agency on Aging a non-profit agency serving seniors in  Penobscot, Piscataquis, Hancock, and Washington counties since 1973. We discuss EAAA’s many programs and then focus on the Furry Friends Food Bank, a program that helps seniors feed their pets. Don addresses the many benefits of keeping pets and seniors together and explains why supporting the Furry Friends Food Bank with an annual fundraiser is so important to the team at Green Acres Kennel Shop. All of the pet food distributed through the Eastern Area Agency on Aging is donated by kind, caring individuals. To them, we say “Thank you!”

We hope that after you listen to the show or podcast that you will want to donate our annual fundraiser. You can learn more at www.greenacres-donate.com

You can learn more about the Eastern Area Agency on Aging at https://www.eaaa.org/

You can learn more about the Eastern Area Agency on Aging Furry Friends Food Bank at https://www.eaaa.org/furry-friends-food-bank/

You can hear The Woof Meow Show on Z62 Retro Radio, AM620, and WKIT HD3 at 9 AM on Saturday. If you are not near a radio, listen on your computer at http://streamdb7web.securenetsystems.net/ce/index.cfm?stationCallSign=WZON or your smartphone or tablet with the free WZON 620 AM app. A podcast of the show is typically posted immediately after the show. You can download this show and others at http://woofmeowshow.libsyn.com/ and the Apple iTunes store.

< Click to Listen to Podcast >

©18NOV18, Donald J. Hanson, All Rights Reserved
< Click for Copyright and Use Policy >

Podcast – Pet Dental Care with Dr. Dave Cloutier from Veazie Veterinary Clinic

< Click to Listen to Podcast >

In this episode of The Woof Meow Show from February 17th, 2018  Don has a conversation with Dr. Dave Cloutier of the Veazie Veterinary Clinic in which they discuss: how dental disease affects our pets and why we need to be concerned, what a veterinarian does when they perform a dental exam and cleaning, typical dental problems of cats and dogs – they are different, home dental care for dogs and cats, and lastly we discuss specialty dental procedures like root canals. Your pet’s teeth matter so; please take care of them.

< Click to Listen to Podcast >

To Contact Dr. Cloutier

Dr. David Cloutier
Veazie Veterinary Clinic
1522 State Street, Veazie, ME 00401-7014

(207) 941-8840

 https://www.veazievet.com/

https://www.facebook.com/veazievet/

 

Recommended Resources

Articles on Don’s Blog ( http://www.words-woofs-meows.com )

 

Health & Wellness – Pet Dental Carehttp://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2017/02/06/health-wellness-pet-dental-care/

Product Review – Wysong DentaTreat™http://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2017/02/06/product-review-wysong-dentatreat/

 

Podcasts from The Woof Meow Show ( http://www.woofmeowshow.com )

Pet Dental Care with Dr. Katie Carter from River Road Veterinary Hospitalhttp://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2017/04/29/pet-health-and-wellness-pet-dental-care-with-dr-katie-carter-from-river-road-veterinary-hospital/

Pet Dental Health with Dr. Mark Hanks from Kindred Spirits Veterinary Clinichttp://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2016/02/28/podcast-pet-dental-health-with-dr-mark-hanks-from-kindred-spirits-veterinary-clinic/

Pet Dental Care with Dr. Dave Cloutier of the Veazie Veterinary Clinichttp://traffic.libsyn.com/woofmeowshow/WoofMeowShow-2014-02-08-Pet_Dental_Care_with_Dr_Dave_Cloutier_of_the_Veazie_Veterinary_Clinic.mp3

 

©20FEB18, Donald J. Hanson, All Rights Reserved
< Click for Copyright and Use Policy >

2017 Holiday Gift Ideas for Cats, Dogs, and Their People

It is the holidays, and once again it is time for us to find that special gift for our favorite feline, our delightful dog, and maybe even for our family members, friends, and co-workers who have pets. Green Acres Kennel Shop has come up with a list of gift ideas. To make it easy for you, we have categorized our recommendations by cats, dogs, cats and dogs, and people, Happy gift giving!

Especially for Cats

The Kong Company is well known for their dog toys, and they are stepping up the game with cat toys.

Kong Refillables are soft, snuggly, and plush. However, best of all, each one has a re-closable pouch to securely hold fresh catnip. The toys include a generous amount of KONG’s premium North American catnip in a re-closable vial.

When the catnip scent starts to fade, just add more fresh catnip for another round of fun! Catnip can be stored in the freezer to help keep it fresh. The toy is machine washable with the catnip removed.

Watch your cat attack, wrestle and snuggle with its KONG Kickeroo. This unique cat toy appeals to a cat’s instinctive desire to stalk and capture prey. The Kickeroo’s size, shape, and material were specially chosen to promote wrestling and hind paw kicking.

The fluffy tail provides movement for extra excitement, not to mention there is a generous amount of KONG’s potent North American catnip inside to further encourage play. Don’t be surprised if the Kickeroo becomes your cat’s favorite toy.

 

The KONG Snake Teaser is perfect for fun, interactive play and a great way to strengthen the bond between you and your cat. Irresistible feathers and unpredictable movement will stimulate your feline friend’s natural hunting instincts and provide beneficial exercise. The Snake Teaser is sure to bring out the playful tiger in any cat. Durable and safe, this item is for supervised play only.

 

 

Vital Essential Cat Treats – Cats appreciate treats just like our dogs do, but so many of the cat treats on the market are filled with unhealthy ingredients. Why not give your cat a treat that they will love and that is good for them. Vital Essentials cat treats come in a wide variety of formulas, and all are 100% freeze-dried meat. You can choose from Wild Alaskan Salmon, Chicken Breast, Chicken Giblets, Minnows, Duck Liver, Rabbit, and Ahi Tuna. Treat your cat like the friend you know they are!

Beco Cat Bowls – If you have not noticed, our cats are sensitive to their environment, including the types of dishes we use to feed them. The Beco Bowl for cats has a much lower rim so that our feline friend’s sensitive whiskers do not brush up against the sides making dinner time that much easier. Many sophisticated cats may refuse to eat out of a metal or plastic bowl, but because Beco’s bamboo plastic is toxin-free, they will happily eat out of the Beco Bowl. We have been using the Beco bowls in the cattery at Green Acres for a year now, and the cats love them

Especially for Dogs

Benebone Chews – Dogs love to chew, so one of the gifts you can give them that you will both appreciate is a chew toy. Our favorite new chew toys come from a company called Benebone; a small, family owned company that makes these fantastic treats right here in the USA. Benebone products are chew toys made of super-strong nylon and food-grade bacon, peanuts, and chicken. They use no chemicals or artificial flavors. The Wishbone comes in three sizes and three flavors while the Dental Chew comes in three flavors and two sizes. Our dogs love their Benebone’s and believe your dog would love one in their stocking.

 

Beco Environmentally Friendly Toys – Although your dog has probably not told you they are an eco-warrior, the fact is degradations in our environment are even more harmful to our pets than they are to us. That is why we love Beco Pets, a company that makes eco-friendly, long lasting and fun products for pets.

The Beco Hoop on a Rope is made from 100% natural rice husk rubber and is attached to natural cotton rope.  It is designed to be as stretchy and flexible as possible. It is the perfect toy for older dogs with fragile teeth, and the smaller version offers a great teether for any puppy, as it is soft and lightweight, while really durable.

Each Beco Soft Toy has an irresistible squeaker inside, and its covers are double cross stitched making them especially durable! These toys are made from recycled plastic bottles and are named after employees at Beco.

The Beco Jungle Triple Knot is the perfect rope toy for long distance throwing and fetch. The Beco Rope toys are made from 98% Hemp and 2% recycled cotton. Hemp is a very eco-friendly material as it grows very quickly and no pesticides or fertilizers are used in the growing process. Most importantly though it is better for your dog as unlike cotton and synthetic ropes, it has very short fibers which are more easily digestible. The short fibers mean that hemp is tougher than cotton or synthetic ropes, as it is harder for the dog to pull apart. Beco Hemp rope toys are better for you dog and better for the environment.

Ruffwear Toys & Coats – Ruffwear makes great clothing and toys for dogs.

The Ruffwear Huckama™ Rubber Throw Toy moves like a critter and is fun to chase. This durable, interactive toy keeps dogs engaged with its erratic bounce and roll. The hollow design accepts food for treat rewards and whistles when hurled through the air. Made from sustainable, natural latex rubber, a renewable resource.

The Ruffwear Gourdo™ Rubber Throw Toy rubber toy is designed for interactive play, from tugging to throwing, this durable rubber toy does it all. The kernmantle [really, strong and flexible] rope lanyard makes it easy to throw and pick up, while avoiding the slobbery rubber end.

Please note:  All Ruffwear toys are interactive and intended for supervised play. They are not designed to be chew toys. Once the interactive play has finished, place the Ruffwear toy out of your dog’s reach and replace with a designated chew toy.

The Ruffwear Front Range™ Harness is an everyday harness that is easy to put on and comfortable for dogs to wear. The harness features two leash attachment points: an aluminum V-ring centered on the dog’s back for everyday walks, and reinforced webbing at the dog’s chest for training or additional control. The ID pocket keeps dog tags quiet and easily accessible.

We live in Maine and let’s admit it; sometimes even our dogs are happier in a coat. The Ruffwear Overcoat™ is a classic cold-weather utility jacket. This vest-style jacket is built with sturdy, durable materials to keep up with the most active dog. Wind- and water-resistant outer fabric protects against harsh elements, while interior recycled polyester fleece lining keeps body heat in. Side-release buckles on both sides provide easy on/off, and a leash portal allows the Overcoat to be worn over our Front Range™ Harness.

Another favorite dog toy at Green Acres is made right here in Maine. The Floating Rope Fetch Toy by Downeast Nautical is a favorite, especially for dogs that love the water! My dog Muppy is a certified landlubber but still loves retrieving her rope toy when I toss it from the living room to the far end of the kitchen.

This fall we brought in a new line of soft toys from Tall Tails. The Tall Tails Plush Squirrel is inspired by the outdoors and is designed for endless interactive play. The squeaker is sewn into a separate pouch and stitched into the seam for extra protection against choking, while the plush exterior makes for a soft and friendly companion. While I was writing this post, my dog Muppy found this toy on the floor where I had inadvertently dropped it. I heard the noise, knew she was having fun, and realized that due to my inattention I had just bought her a new toy. Muppy gives the Tall Tails Plush Squirrel 5 Paws. She is sure that your dog would also like the Chipmunk, Duck, Goose, Fish and other toys in the Tall Tails family.

Vital Essentials Treats and Snacks – A favorite line of training treats are the Freeze Dried Meat Treats from Vital Essentials. They are small,  high value, come in a variety of flavors, and are a very healthy option. Please note, that while labeled dog treats, cats love these treats as well.

Training treats are great for training and giving our dog a small reward; however, like most of us, I occasionally like to give Muppy a special snack. That is when I go to the Vital Essentials Raw Bar for the tasty and healthy snacks she loves. Muppy’s personal favorites are the freeze-dried chicken necks and duck necks. They are the perfect size for her. Other dogs love the cod skins, salmon skins, turkey necks, turkey wings, and bully sticks. If you are looking for a high value and healthy snack, check-out the selection at the Vital Essentials Raw Bar.

Earth Animal No-Hide Chews are a healthier and more digestible alternative to Rawhide. No-Hide Chews gives new meaning to dog snack. They are more durable and digestible than any other chew on the market and dogs love them.

No-Hide Chews are available in Chicken, Beef, and their new Pork flavor.

Especially for Both Cats and Dogs

Raw Rewards Treats from Northwest Naturals are the latest addition to our treat selection at the Green Acres Kennel Shop. One of the things we like about these treats is that they are equally yummy to dogs and cats. However, we also love that they are manufactured in a quality controlled USDA human food inspected facility from meat sourced in the USA and New Zealand. These freeze-dried treats have only a single ingredient, making them ideal for pets with food-related sensitivities. Raw Rewards Beef Liver, Bison Liver, Chicken Liver, Lamb Liver, Pork Liver and Salmon treats are highly palatable and easy to feed.

Especially for People with Pets

At the top of my gift recommendations for dog owners, this year is the new book A Kids’ Comprehensive Guide to Speaking Dog! by Niki Tudge –If your family includes children and a dog, if you have children that spend time with friends and family members that have a dog, or if you have a dog that spends any time around children, you, your children, and your dog will benefit from your reading A Kids’ Comprehensive Guide to Speaking Dog!.

The goal of this new book from author Niki Tudge and Doggone Safe is to provide a resource that anyone can use to teach children how to be safe around dogs by teaching them how to “speak dog.” As a dog training instructor that teaches both adults and children how to train their dogs, we make teaching canine body language part of our classes. What I have learned over the past 22 years is that before taking a dog training class, even most adults are not aware of most aspects of “speaking dog,” which is why I believe this book will be of value to both children and adults.

A Kids’ Comprehensive Guide to Speaking Dog! is written to be used as an interactive resource and uses cartoons and photographs to illustrate body language dogs use to signal when they are happy, afraid, and angry. By teaching children, and adults, how to read and respond to these signs the book helps keep people and dogs safe. The world is full of children and dogs, and it is essential that we teach them how to interact safely. A Kids’ Comprehensive Guide to Speaking Dog! combined with a parent or teacher does just that.  I give this book five paws!

If you have a pet, you have pet hair in places where you would rather not have pet hair. The easiest and most effective way to remove that pet hair is with the Fur-Zoff. This simple tool does the job far better than anything else we have found. Bangor’s own amazing automobile detailer Jesse Bell of Adept Auto Detailing swears by his Fur-Zoff.

 

 

A Green Acres Kennel Shop Gift Card – If you just cannot decide or are unsure what to get, you cannot go wrong with a Green Acres Kennel Shop Gift Card. Available in the denominations of $5 and up, they can be used for any product or services at Green Acres Kennel Shop.

©5DEC17, Donald J. Hanson, All Rights Reserved
< Click for Copyright and Use Policy >

Dog Behavior – Does My Dogs Breed Matter? – Parts 1, 2 & 3

< Versions of these articles were published in the July, August, and September issues of Downeast Dog News>

< Updated 14SEP17 >

< You can listen to a podcast on this topic that was broadcast on The Woof Meow on 16SEP17 by clicking here >

I recently saw a meme posted on Facebook with the words “Getting a dog without understanding the breed is like buying a house without an inspection.” A discussion followed as to whether or not this was a good way to emphasize that breed matters when you are selecting a dog that will best fit into your family, lifestyle, and the environment in which you and your dog will live. I agree with the sentiment of the text in this meme; however, I believe that the question of how important breed is when selecting a dog is far too important to leave to a discussion on Facebook. If you want the greatest probability of getting a great canine companion, you need to consider breed before purchasing or adopting a dog, and your research needs to extend beyond social media and avid fans of the breed. Every breed or mix of breeds has its downside, not often apparent to their biggest fans.

The American Kennel Club (AKC) currently recognizes 202 different breeds of dogs organized into seven groups: Herding, Hound, Non-Sporting, Sporting, Terrier, Toy, and Working. Different breeds of dogs exist because each breed was developed to address a particular need or role in serving humans.

In some cases, the AKC group description is helpful in understanding what a dog was bred to do, while some of the groups contain breeds with a wide variety of individual physical and behavioral traits and I question how they were lumped into the same group. However, looking at the Group is a good place to start. Below you will find my thoughts on each AKC group and factors that I recommend you consider before deciding which breed is the best for you. Please recognize that you want to choose a breed that is also the best choice for your family, your lifestyle, and the environment in which you live. The average lifespan of a dog, which can also be breed dependent, can range from six to eighteen plus years. As you consider your current lifestyle and environment, think about the future and what your life will be like when your dog is older. Adding children to your life or moving from a rural to an urban environment should be considered when you choose your breed.

FMIhttp://bit.ly/FindingTheRightDogForYou

The Herding and Hound Groups

Herding Group

All breeds share the fabulous ability to control the movement of other animals. …pure instinct prompts many of these dogs to gently herd their owners, especially the children of the family.1

The most popular of the breeds in the Herding group is the German Shepherd Dog, which has been second on the AKC’s list of Most Popular Dog Breeds for the past four years2. Other dogs in this group include Australian Shepherds (#16), Corgis (#18, #69), Shetland Sheepdogs (#24), Collies (#37), Border Collies (#38), and more.

I describe many dogs in the herding group as “Those with a passion for bringing order out of chaos.” Often the dogs in this group need to herd and will attempt to round-up everything from your livestock, to ducks at the park, your cats, other dogs, the neighbor’s children, and yes, even stationary tennis balls. Some breeds herd with their eyes while others use quick, but effective and often uncomfortable nips with their teeth. If you live in a chaotic household and have children nearby, you should carefully consider if a dog from the herding group is a good choice for your situation. On a positive note, the dogs in the herding group have been bred to work in close collaboration with a person so they can be easier to train.

Hound Group

Most hounds share the common ancestral trait of being used for hunting. Some use acute scenting powers to follow a trail. Others demonstrate a phenomenal gift of stamina as they relentlessly run down quarry.1

The favorite breed in the Hound group is the Beagle, which has been the fifth most popular dog in the USA since 20152. Other dogs in the Hound group include Dachshunds (#13), Bassett Hounds (#39), Bloodhounds (#52), Greyhounds (#151), and more.

The key thing to remember about the AKC’s comments on the Hound group is that hounds were bred to hunt by selectively breeding them to emphasize their predatory instincts. Some hounds use their sight, and some use their impressive sense of smell, but they are both experts at detecting and chasing down prey. Since hounds often work independently of their handler, unlike the breeds in the Herding and Sporting group, a hound may be more challenging to train. While it is not impossible to train a hound to be off-leash in unfenced areas, it will typically take more time and higher value rewards. Some hounds will never reach off-leash reliability no matter how skilled you are at training. Because many of the hound breeds have been bred to work as a group, they can have excellent social skills and will often do well with other dogs.

FMIhttp://bit.ly/ChoosingADogTrainer

Many dogs in shelters are labeled as being part hound, and we see a wide variety of them for both boarding and daycare. If you put the time and effort into training your hound and have reasonable expectations, they can make excellent, laid back companions. Yes, I said laid back. I cannot think of any hound I have met that I would classify as hyper.

Some would argue that future behavior is all about the environment and the way a dog is raised. Environment certainly plays a tremendous role in a dog’s temperament but so do genetics, and we cannot change genetics. If you want the best possible companion that meets your criteria of “the perfect dog,” then spend some time researching the breeds before you get your dog.

The Sporting, Non-Sporting, Terrier, and Toy Groups

Last month I started a three-part series on the importance of understanding your dog’s breed and what they were bred to do before selecting a dog. That understanding is critical to making sure you get the perfect dog that we all seek. Last month I discussed the AKC Herding and Hound groups. This month I will look at the Non-Sporting, Sporting, Terrier, and Toy groups.

Non-Sporting Group

– “The breeds in the Non-Sporting Group are a varied collection in terms of size, coat, personality and overall appearance.1

Some of the more popular breeds in the Non-Sporting group include Bulldogs (#4), French Bulldogs (#6), Poodles (#15), the Bichon Frise (#45), Dalmatian (#62), Keeshond (#92), and more2.

The breeds in the Non-Sporting group are so diverse that discussing them as a group is not very valuable. For that reason, I recommend that anyone considering a dog from this group not only talk to breeders but also veterinarians, trainers, and kennel and daycare owners about your particular breed of interest. Always make sure you seek advice from those with no financial gain in the breed that you choose.

FMIhttp://bit.ly/FindingTheRightDogForYou

Sporting Group

Naturally active and alert, Sporting dogs make likeable, well-rounded companions. … Potential owners of Sporting dogs need to realize that most require regular, invigorating exercise.1

The Labrador Retriever has been the most popular dog in the US for many years, and the Golden Retriever often holds the number three spot on the AKC most popular breeds list2. Other popular breeds in the Sporting group include; German Short-Haired Pointers (#11), Brittany’s (#25), English Springer Spaniels (#26), Cocker Spaniels (#29), and more.

We see lots of Sporting breeds in Maine due to their overall popularity but also probably because many Mainers love outdoor adventures and so do the dogs in the Sporting group. These dogs are bred to work closely with their handler, so they often are some of the easiest dogs to train. However, they do tend to be some of the larger breeds as well as being well known for their enthusiastic exuberance. If you have a dog from the Sporting group, starting training at an early age is essential. Because of their retrieving instincts, some of the Sporting breeds can be overly mouthy, so training them appropriate bite inhibition before they are 13 weeks of age is critical.

FMIhttp://bit.ly/ChoosingADogTrainer

For hundreds of years, retrievers have been bred to have the stamina and instincts to hunt during hunting season while being able to relax and be an ideal companion dog the rest of the year. Within the past few years, some of these dogs have been bred to be, in my opinion, overly driven so as to be more competitive in field trials. These dogs are not always a good choice as a companion as they often exhibit poor bite inhibition and a hyperactive personality.

Terrier Group

These are feisty, energetic dogs whose sizes range from fairly small, as in the Norfolk, Cairn or West Highland White Terrier, to the grand Airedale Terrier. Terriers typically have little tolerance for other animals, including other dogs. Their ancestors were bred to hunt and kill vermin. …In general, they make engaging pets, but require owners with the determination to match their dogs’ lively characters.1

The most popular breed in the Terrier group is the Miniature Schnauzer at #17. Other dogs in the Terrier group include the West Highland White Terrier (#41), Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier (#50), Airedale Terrier (#55), and others2. You may have noted that Terriers fall lower on the popularity list and that is because a terrier is not for everyone.

The AKC group description indicates that dogs in the Terrier group often have issues with other animals, including dogs. I describe Terriers as being the Seal Team of the dog world; they seek out and kill and do it very efficiently. That sometimes makes them less than ideal for those new to dogs, those with children, and those that are fans of backyard wildlife. If you have other animals in your home, talk to a certified dog trainer or canine behavior consultant about adding a Terrier to your family before committing to do so.

FMIhttp://bit.ly/ChoosingADogTrainer

Toy Group

The diminutive size and winsome expressions of Toy dogs illustrate the main function of this Group: to embody sheer delight.1

The most popular breeds in the Toy group include; Yorkshire Terrier (#9), Cavalier King Charles Spaniel (#19), Shih Tzu (#20) and Pug (#32)2. The most distinguishing feature of these breeds is their size; they are small. The shape of their faces, the length of their coat, and personality can vary widely.

Many breeds in the Toy group were bred specifically to serve as lap companions. We see several toy breeds for boarding and grooming at Green Acres, and they have very endearing qualities. For someone that primarily wants a canine buddy, they can be ideal. I often recommend both the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel and the Pug for first-time dog parents. They are small, durable, have great personalities and are pretty low maintenance, although both breeds may suffer from serious health issues.

Some would argue that future behavior is all about the environment and the way a dog is raised. Environment certainly plays a tremendous role in a dog’s temperament but so do genetics, and we cannot change genetics. If you want the best possible companion that meets your criteria of “the perfect dog,” then spend some time researching the breeds before you get your dog.

Next month I will close out this three- part series by discussing the AKC Working group and Mixed Breed dogs.

The Working Group and Mixed Breeds

This is part three of a three-part series on the importance of understanding your dog’s breed and what they were bred to do before selecting a dog. That understanding is critical to making sure you get the perfect dog that we all seek. In July I discussed AKC Herding and Hound groups and in August I looked at the Non-Sporting, Sporting, Terrier, and Toy groups. This month I will address the AKC Working Group and Mixed Breed dogs.

Working Group

Dogs of the Working Group were bred to perform such jobs as guarding property, pulling sleds and performing water rescues. They have been invaluable assets to man throughout the ages. …Their considerable dimensions and strength alone, however, make many working dogs unsuitable as pets for average families. And again, by virtue of their size alone, these dogs must be properly trained.1

FMIhttp://bit.ly/ChoosingADogTrainer

If you look at the top 10 list for dogs in the US you will find these breeds from the Working group; Rottweiler (#8) and Boxer (#10). Other popular breeds in this group include the Siberian Husky (#12), Great Dane (#14), Doberman Pinscher (#15), Bernese Mountain Dog (#27),Newfoundland (#35), and others2.

Like the Non-Sporting group, the breeds in the Working group are so diverse that discussing them as a group is not helpful. For that reason, I recommend that anyone considering a dog from this group talk to breeders as well as veterinarians, trainers, kennel and daycare owners about the particular breeds that interest you. Always make sure you seek advice from those with no financial gain in the breed that you choose.

FMIhttp://bit.ly/FindingTheRightDogForYou

The dogs in the Working group were bred for a wide variety of purposes. The livestock guarding dogs were historically bred in the fields with the animals that they are supposed to protect. They are independent and naturally suspicious of all but the flock they guard and a few people. The Northern breeds in this group; Alaskan Malamute, Siberian Husky, and Samoyed love the cold and snow and find the heat uncomfortable.

Other factors to consider with the breeds in the Working group are their size and strength. Can you safely handle a dog this big? Are you physically able to or do you have a plan to lift them and carry them should the need arise? Are you committed to training the dog?  A dog from the working group can be an excellent choice if your lifestyle is compatible with what they need to thrive. If you have other dogs in your life, you need to consider the difference in size between the dogs. The play between a large dog in from the Working group and a toy breed will need to be carefully supervised.

FMIhttp://bit.ly/ChoosingADogTrainer

We care for many dogs in the Working Group, primarily Boxers, Great Danes, Bernese Mountain Dogs, and Mastiffs. They all do well, and we enjoy seeing them; however, they each have very individual personalities, so it is important that we take the time to get to know them well.

The most important consideration when getting a dog is their temperament and personality. While both vary in any breed, when choosing a pure-bred puppy or dog you can look to the breed for a highly probable predictor of what you will get. The same cannot be said of mixed breeds.

Mixed Breeds or Mutts

Fifty-percent of the dogs in the US are mixed breeds. I know from personal experience, with my own mixed breeds as well as the many that we care for at Green Acres, that mixed breeds can be marvelous companions. However, when getting a mixed breed, it can be problematic because you do not always know what you are getting. Knowing what breeds make up your mixed breed is difficult at best unless you make use of a reliable DNA test.

Unless your mixed breed is a “designer breed” like one of the many varieties of Doodles, there was probably no witness to the breeding. That means that your mixed breed was labeled as being a “something/something” by a person, based solely on their appearance or physical traits. Unfortunately, that is not a very accurate way to determine a mix of breeds.

In 2012, a study3, 4 was initiated to “…determine the accuracy of visual breed identification compared to DNA breed profiles.” The study looked at 100 shelter dogs. Photos of the dogs were reviewed by “Self-identified “dog experts,” including breeders, exhibitors, trainers, groomers, behaviorists, rescuers, shelter staff, veterinarians, and veterinary technicians…” Their identification of the breed mix of each dog in the photo was compared to a DNA test of that dog. The results indicated “Respondents correctly identified a prominent breed an average of 27% of the time. Each of the dogs had an average of 53 different predominant breeds selected. No one correctly identified a breed for 6% of the dogs, and 22% of the dogs had the correct breed chosen less than 1% of the time. Only 15% of the dogs were correctly identified more than 70% of the time. These results indicate that, regardless of profession, visual identification of the breeds of dogs with unknown heritage is poor.” [Emphasis added] In other words, mixed breed dogs in shelters or rescues are misidentified more often than not.

FMIhttps://vetmed-maddie.sites.medinfo.ufl.edu/files/2012/05/2012-Croy-Maddies-Shelter-Medicine-Confernce-Abstract.pdf

My dog Muppy was labeled as a Golden Retriever/Cocker Spaniel mix when we adopted her. She certainly looks like a Golden Retriever/Cocker Spaniel mix, and we love her just as she is, but we decided to do a DNA test just to learn more. The Mars Wisdom Panel reports that Muppy’s DNA indicates that she is 37%, Cocker Spaniel. The test was not able to identify other specific breeds in her lineage but does suggest that the next largest component comes from the Terrier group. Muppy has DNA from what the Mars Wisdom Panel defines as the Middle East and African group which contains breeds such as the Afghan Hound, Basenji, Saluki, and Rhodesian Ridgeback. Lastly, according to the test, she contains some DNA from the Herding group.

We decided to do a second test, this one by Embark, which many consider to be more definitive. The Embark test reports that Muppy is: 44.7% Cocker Spaniel, 30.0% Rat Terrier, 12.2% Boston Terrier, and 13.1% SuperMutt. The latter is a category where Embark lumps together other DNA evidence that suggests Muppy may have small amounts of DNA from other distant ancestors, in her case: the American Eskimo Dog, Bearded Collie, and Collie.

FMIMuppy’s Embark resultsembk.me/muppy

No identifiable DNA was found in Muppy that would suggest that she is part Golden Retriever, Both tests indicate she is predominantly Cocker Spaniel and terrier. I suspect the Golden Retriever came into play when she was in rescue. When Muppy was rescued, she was pregnant. I have seen photos of her puppies and photos of two of those puppies as adults, and her offspring most definitely look like Golden Retrievers. It is quite possible that the father of Muppy’s pups was a Golden or a golden mix. However, the point is, judging by appearance only is highly inaccurate and Muppy is a prime example of how looks can be deceiving. No one labeled her as part terrier based on her appearance, yet both tests suggest a significant amount of terrier DNA.

From a behavioral perspective, Muppy shows several traits from her Cocker Spaniel lineage; she is very into birds; she points, and she retrieves. She also knows how to use her nose, and does so more than any other dog I have owned. I do not know if that trait is because of her DNA or is a behavior that was learned in order to survive as a stray. Muppy has been very easy to train, which could be due to her Sporting Group genes or her possible Herding DNA, or both. I do not see any Terrier behavioral characteristics.

Some would argue that future behavior is all about the environment and the way a dog is raised. Environment certainly plays a tremendous role in a dog’s temperament but so do genetics, and we cannot change genetics. If you want the best possible companion that meets your criteria of “the perfect dog,” then spend some time researching the breeds before you get your dog.

References

1 AKC websitehttp://www.akc.org/public-education/resources/dog-breeds-sorted-groups/

2 Most Popular Dog Breeds – Full Ranking Listhttp://www.akc.org/content/news/articles/most-popular-dog-breeds-full-ranking-list/

3 Dog Breed Identification: What kind of dog is that?http://sheltermedicine.vetmed.ufl.edu/library/research-studies/current-studies/dog-breeds/

4 What kind or dog is that? Accuracy of dog breed assessment by canine stakeholdershttps://vetmed-maddie.sites.medinfo.ufl.edu/files/2012/05/2012-Croy-Maddies-Shelter-Medicine-Confernce-Abstract.pdf

Recommended Resources

Articles on Don’s Blog (http://www.words-woofs-meows.com)

Finding the Right Dog for You and Your Family – http://bit.ly/FindingTheRightDogForYou

How to choose a dog trainerhttp://bit.ly/ChoosingADogTrainer

Podcasts from The Woof Meow Show (http://www.woofmeowshow.com)

Finding the Right Dog for You and Your Family – http://bit.ly/FindingTheRightDogForYou

How to choose a dog trainerhttp://bit.ly/ChoosingADogTrainer

________________________________________________________________________
Don Hanson is the co-owner of the Green Acres Kennel Shop (greenacreskennel.com) in Bangor. He is a Bach Foundation Registered Animal Practitioner (BFRAP), Certified Dog Behavior Consultant (CDBC), Associate Certified Cat Behavior Consultant (ACCBC) and a Certified Professional Dog Trainer (CPDT-KA). He produces and co- hosts a weekly radio show and podcast, The Woof Meow Show heard on The Pulse AM620 WZON and streamed at http://www.wzonradio.com/ every Saturday at 9 AM. A list of upcoming shows and podcasts of past shows can be found at www.woofmeowshow.com. Don also writes about pets at his blog: www.words-woofs-meows.com.

©3SEP17, Donald J. Hanson, All Rights Reserved
< Click for Copyright and Use Policy >