Book Reviews – Knowledge to Enrich the Life of You and Your Dog – The Best Dog Books of 2021

< A version of this article was published in the December 2021 issue of Downeast Dog News>

< Updated 15NOV21 >

< A short link for this page – https://bit.ly/BkRvwNOV2021 >

It’s the holiday season and a time when we often think about giving gifts to others. The greatest gift my parents gave me was a love of reading and a thirst for knowledge. It was a gift given out of love, knowing that it had the potential to benefit not only me but those around me. I believe it was the greatest gift I have ever received. It has nurtured my life-long love of learning, a character trait essential for any professional. What we have learned about dogs and cats in the last 30 years is amazing, and if you haven’t been keeping up, you are out of date as much of what we thought we knew has been proven incomplete or wrong.

As you may know, I often write about my favorite dog book of the year in December. This year I am highlighting two books whose content can help enrich the lives of you and your dog.

Puppy Socialization: What It Is and How to Do It by Marge Rogers and Eileen Anderson contains knowledge essential to anyone who works with puppies, has a puppy, or is contemplating getting a puppy. It is available as a paperback or in multiple e-book formats.  It is available as a paperback or in multiple e-book formats.

The concept of puppy socialization was extensively researched at Maine’s own Jackson Laboratory for 20 years, culminating in the publication of Genetics and the Social Behavior of the Dog by Scott and Fuller in 1965. Yet, 56 years later, too many in the dog world still do not understand the essential basics of puppy socialization. For example, it has a specific endpoint (12 to 16 weeks of age), it is as important as vaccinations, it doesn’t happen by accident but requires careful planning, it involves meeting more than the neighbors and their dog, it means creating a positive association with new things, requires you to advocate for what is best for your puppy, and is essential for normal social development.

As a canine behavior consultant, I assist people with dogs with deep-seated anxiety and often anti-social behavior that is likely the result of inappropriate or inadequate socialization during the critical period. This debilitating mental illness might have been prevented had the person caring for the dog understood puppy socialization. Reading and following the precepts in Puppy Socialization: What It Is and How to Do It might prevent you from ever needing the services of a canine behavior consultant or veterinary behaviorist.

Rogers and Anderson’s book will teach those who read it what they need to know to socialize their puppy, thus helping them have a great life together. In addition to the easy-to-read text and beautiful photographs, the book includes links to over 50 online videos. Note, it is easiest to access those videos and other online resources from one of the e-book editions.

I am so impressed by Puppy Socialization: What It Is and How to Do It that I am: 1) making it required reading for all Green Acres Kennel Shop staff, 2) incorporating it into the curriculum for my ForceFreePets.com online Puppy Headstart class, 3) will be including copies for all students in that class starting January 1st, and 4) will be gifting the book to several veterinary colleagues so that they may share it with their staff after reading it themselves.

Feeding Dogs. Dry or Raw? The Science Behind The Debate by Conor Brady, PhD. will hopefully end the debate over how to feed our dogs for optimum health. Dr. Brady spent 10-years examining what the scientific literature tells us about canine nutrition answering such questions as: is the dog a carnivore or omnivore, what are the problems with feeding kibble, why are so many people pro-kibble and anti-fresh food despite evidence to the contrary, and how to feed a dog a species-appropriate diet for optimal health. In addition, you will find a comprehensive reference list to the peer-reviewed scientific research supporting the author’s conclusions at the end of each section.

Available as a hardcover book or four e-books, Brady’s Feeding Dogs is worth every penny for those who understand that proper nutrition is the foundation of physical, mental, and emotional health. In my opinion, Feeding Dogs should be required reading for every student of veterinary medicine and recommended to every pet parent interested in optimal nutrition.

If you want to learn more about Feeding Dogs and Dr. Brady before reading the book, I encourage you to listen to this 40-minute interview at https://bit.ly/IntvwDrConorBradyFeedingDogs

No matter which winter holidays you celebrate, I wish you and your pet happy holidays and a great 2022.

Recommended Resources

Articles on Don’s Blog
( http://www.words-woofs-meows.com  )

Puppy Essentials 101- Body Language & Socialization – https://bit.ly/BHS-SocBdyLang

Essential Handouts On Body Language, and Canine and Human Behavior from Dr. Sophia YinPuppy – https://bit.ly/YinBodyLang

Socialization and Habituation – http://bit.ly/SocializationPuppy

How Can I Tell When My Dog Is Anxious or Fearful? – http://bit.ly/DogsSignsofFear

Especially for New Puppy Parentshttp://bit.ly/EspcNewPuppyParents

Alone Traininghttp://bit.ly/AloneTraining

Which Companies Are Behind Your Pet’s Food?  – http://bit.ly/PetFoodComp

What I Feed My Dog and Why I Feed What I Do – https://bit.ly/WhatIFeedAndWhy

Pet Food Myths & Facts – No. 1, MYTH – Only a Board-Certified Veterinary Nutritionist is qualified to formulate pet foodhttp://bit.ly/PetFoodMyths-Facts-4MAR21

Pet Nutrition Facts – Do You Want Optimal Nutrition, Low Cost, or Convenience? You CANNOT Have It Allhttp://bit.ly/PetNut-Opt-Cost-Con

Podcasts from The Woof Meow Show
( http://woofmeowshow.libsyn.com/ )

Podcast – Especially for New Puppy Parents – Part 1http://bit.ly/WfMw-Esp_Pups1

Podcast – Especially for New Puppy Parents – Part 2http://bit.ly/WfMw-Esp_Pups2

Podcast – Especially for New Puppy Parents – Part 3http://bit.ly/WfMw-Esp_Pups3

Don Hanson and Dr. Dave Cloutier on Puppy Socialization and Vaccinationhttp://traffic.libsyn.com/woofmeowshow/Pet_Tip_-Don_Hanson_and_Dr._Dave_Cloutier_on_Puppy_Socialization_and_Vaccinations.mp3

Podcast – What We Feed Our Pets and Why, with – Don Hanson, Kate Dutra, and Linda Casehttps://bit.ly/WfMw-WhatWeFeed-11JUL20

Podcasts-Two Conversations with Animal Nutritionist Dr. Richard Pattonhttps://bit.ly/WfMw2wPattonAPR21

________________________________________________________________________
Don Hanson is the co-owner of the Green Acres Kennel Shop ( greenacreskennel.com ) in Bangor, Maine, where he has been helping people with their pets since 1995. He is also the founder of ForceFreePets.com, an online educational resource for people with dogs and cats. Don is a Bach Foundation Registered Animal Practitioner (BFRAP), Certified Dog Behavior Consultant (CDBC), Associate Certified Cat Behavior Consultant (ACCBC), and a Certified Professional Dog Trainer (CPDT-KA). He is a member of the Pet Professional Guild (PPG). Don is committed to PPG’s Guiding Principles and the Pain-Free, Force-Free, and Fear-Free training, management, and care of all pets. He serves on the PPG Steering Committee and Advocacy Committee and is the Chair of The Shock-Free Coalition ( shockfree.org ). Don produces and co-hosts a weekly radio show and podcast, The Woof Meow Show, that airs on Z62 Retro Radio WZON (AM620) and WKIT 103.3-HD3 streamed at http://bit.ly/AM620-WZON every Saturday at 9 AM. Podcasts of the show are available at http://bit.ly/WfMwPodcasts/, the Apple Podcast app, and Don’s blog: www.words-woofs-meows.com.  The opinions in this post are those of Don Hanson.

©28NOV21, Donald J. Hanson, All Rights Reserved
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Podcast – Understanding, Identifying, and Coping with Canine Stress

< Click to Listen to Podcast >

< Updated 17NOV21 >

< A short link for this page – https://bit.ly/WfMw-09OCT21-CanineStress >

 

In this episode of The Woof Meow Show from October 9th, 2021, Kate and Don discuss Don’s article, Understanding, Identifying, and Coping with Canine Stress, published in the July 2021 issue of BARKS from the Guild and at  https://barksfromtheguild.com/article/understanding-identifying-and-coping-with-canine-stress/

< Click to Listen to Podcast >

Contact Info

Don Hanson & Kate Dutra
Green Acres Kennel Shop, ForceFreePets.com & The Woof Meow Show

Address: 1653 Union St, Bangor, ME 04401-2204
Phone: (207) 945-6841, x103
EmailEmail Don 
Website-Green Acres: https://www.greenacreskennel.com/
Facebook-Green Acres: https://www.facebook.com/GreenAcresKennelShop/
Website-The Woof Meow Show: https://woofmeowshow.libsyn.com/
Facebook-The Woof Meow Show: https://www.facebook.com/WoofMeowShow/
Website-ForceFreePetshttps://forcefreepets.com/ 
Facebook-ForceFreePetshttps://www.facebook.com/ForceFreePets

Recommended Resources

Articles on Don’s Blog
( http://www.words-woofs-meows.com  )

Understanding, Identifying, and Coping with Canine Stress – http://bit.ly/Canine-Stress, and July 2021 issue of BARKS from the Guild and at  https://barksfromtheguild.com/article/understanding-identifying-and-coping-with-canine-stress/

Animal Welfare – Assessing Pets’ Welfare Using Brambell’s Five Freedoms http://bit.ly/Brambells-APDT2014

Do I Need a Dog Trainer or a “Behaviorist”? – http://bit.ly/WWM-Trainer-Behaviorist

Dominance: Reality or Mythhttp://bit.ly/Dominance-RealityorMyth

Helping Your Dog Thrive with Brambell’s Five Freedomshttp://bit.ly/Brambell-1thru5-PDF

Help! My Dog is Aggressive, Reactive, Fearful, Anxious, etc. – What do I do? – WWM – APR2017 – http://bit.ly/HelpDogAggx

How Can I Tell When My Dog Is Anxious or Fearful? – http://bit.ly/DogsSignsofFear

How to Choose a Dog Trainerhttp://bit.ly/HowToChooseADogTrainer

Introduction to Canine Communicationhttp://bit.ly/CanineComm

Understanding Behavior; Why It Mattershttp://bit.ly/AnimalWelfare-Behavior

Management of An Aggressive, Fearful or Reactive Doghttp://bit.ly/BhxManagement

Puppy Socialization and Habituation – http://bit.ly/SocializationPuppy

Reward Based Training versus Aversiveshttp://bit.ly/RewardVSAversive

What Is A Pet Behavior Consultant? – http://bit.ly/WhatIsPetBhxConsulting

What Is Dog Traininghttp://bit.ly/WhatIsDogTraining

Your Pet’s Behavioral Health Is As Important As Their Physical Well-Being: The New AAHA Canine and Feline Behavior Management Guidelineshttp://bit.ly/WWM_AAHA_Bhx

Podcasts from The Woof Meow Show
( http://woofmeowshow.libsyn.com/ )

 Canine Behavior: Myths and Facts – http://bit.ly/WfMwK9Bhx-26MAR16

Pet Behavior, Vets & The AAHA Canine and Feline Behavior Management Guidelines with Dr. Dave Cloutierhttp://bit.ly/WfMw-AAHA-Guidelines-13MAR16

The Dominance and Alpha Myth (2010) – http://bit.ly/WfMw-Dominance-2010

Other Online Resources

American Animal Hospital Association (2015.) AAHA Canine and Feline Behavior Management Guidelines – https://www.aaha.org/aaha-guidelines/behavior-management/behavior-management-home/

BCSPCA. (2016, June 28). Tip Tuesday: Tips for dealing with dog reactivity – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j1J8uuJi0Ys

 Garrod, D. (2019, November). Stress Matters. BARKS from the Guild (39) 36-39https://issuu.com/petprofessionalguild/docs/bftg_november_2019_online_edition_x_opt/36

Pet Professional Guild Finding A Professional (2020) – https://www.petprofessionalguild.com/Zip-Code-Search

Pet Professional Guild Guiding Principles (2012)  – https://www.petprofessionalguild.com/Guiding-Principles

Pet Professional Guild Position Statements (2012-2019)https://www.petprofessionalguild.com/Position-Statements

Turid Rugaas – Calming Signals – The Art of Survival (2013)  – http://en.turid-rugaas.no/calming-signals—the-art-of-survival.html

Books

Brambell, R. (1965). Report of the technical committee to enquire into the welfare of animals kept under intensive livestock husbandry systems. London, UK: Her Majesty’s Stationery Office.

Chin, L. (2020). Doggie Language: A Dog Lover’s Guide to Understanding Your Best Friend. Chichester, UK: Summersdale Publishers

O’Heare, J. (2005). Canine Neuropsychology, 3rd edn. Ottawa, ON: DogPsych

Rugaas, T. (2005). On Talking Terms with Dogs: Calming Signals, 2nd edn. Wenatchee, WA: Dogwise

Strong, V. (1999). The Dog’s Brain — A Simple Guide. Windsor, UK: Alpha Publishing

Tudge, N. (2017). A Kids’ Comprehensive Guide to Speaking Dog! n.p.: Doggone Safe

________________________________________________________________________
Don Hanson is the co-owner of the Green Acres Kennel Shop ( greenacreskennel.com ) in Bangor, Maine, where he has been helping people with their pets since 1995. He is also the founder of ForceFreePets.com, an online educational resource for people with dogs and cats. Don is a Bach Foundation Registered Animal Practitioner (BFRAP), Certified Dog Behavior Consultant (CDBC), Associate Certified Cat Behavior Consultant (ACCBC), and a Certified Professional Dog Trainer (CPDT-KA). He is a member of the Pet Professional Guild (PPG). Don serves on the PPG Board of Directors and Steering Committee. In addition, he chairs the Advocacy Committee and The Shock-Free Coalition ( shockfree.org ). Don produces and co-hosts a weekly radio show and podcast, The Woof Meow Show, that airs on Z62 Retro Radio WZON (AM620) and WKIT 103.3-HD3 and is streamed at http://bit.ly/AM620-WZON every Saturday at 9 AM. Podcasts of the show are available at http://bit.ly/WfMwPodcasts/, the Apple Podcast app, and Don’s blog: www.words-woofs-meows.com.  The opinions in this post are those of Don Hanson.

Shared Blog Post – Why Counterconditioning “Doesn’t Work” or How to Help Ensure Counterconditioning Will Work

< Updated 11NOV21>

Angelica Steinker of Courteous Canine, Inc. wrote a brilliant article entitled Why Counterconditioning “Doesn’t Work” for the May 2015 issue of BARKS from the Guild, the professional journal of the Pet Professional Guild. Today the article was posted on the BARKS blog. My only criticism is, I think a better title would have been “How to Help Ensure Counterconditioning Will Work.”

In this article, the author discusses the typical reason a counterconditioning protocol fails; user error. In my experience, far too often, people with a fearful pet are in such a hurry to help their pet that they miss the keys to success that Steinker outlines in her article. The steps she describes can dramatically increase the odds of counterconditioning relieving the dog’s anxiety. The core message is the animal being counter conditioned MUST feel safe and relaxed.

This is a MUST READ for anyone working with fearful animals.

< Click here to read on the BARKS blog >

Recommended Resources

Articles on Don’s Blog
( http://www.words-woofs-meows.com  )

Help! My Dog is Aggressive, Reactive, Fearful, Anxious, etc. – What do I do? http://bit.ly/HelpDogAggx

How Can I Tell When My Dog Is Anxious or Fearful?http://bit.ly/DogsSignsofFear

Introduction to Canine Communication http://bit.ly/CanineComm

Understanding, Identifying and Coping with Canine Stresshttp://bit.ly/Canine-Stress

Management of An Aggressive, Fearful or Reactive Doghttp://bit.ly/BhxManagement

Shared Blog Post – the misunderstanding of time by Nancy Tannerhttp://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2016/11/16/shared-blog-post-the-misunderstanding-of-time-by-nancy-tanner/

The emotional toll of a reactive dog by Jay Gurden in Dog’s Today – http://bit.ly/SharedGurenEmotional

Podcasts from The Woof Meow Show
( http://woofmeowshow.libsyn.com/ )

Anxiety, Fears & Phobias with Dr. Christine Calderhttps://bit.ly/WfMw-AnxFrPhbiaDrCalder

 

 

 

 

 

 

________________________________________________________________________
Don Hanson is the co-owner of the Green Acres Kennel Shop ( greenacreskennel.com ) in Bangor, Maine, where he has been helping people with their pets since 1995. He is also the founder of ForceFreePets.com, an online educational resource for people with dogs and cats. Don is a Bach Foundation Registered Animal Practitioner (BFRAP), Certified Dog Behavior Consultant (CDBC), Associate Certified Cat Behavior Consultant (ACCBC), and a Certified Professional Dog Trainer (CPDT-KA). He is a member of the Pet Professional Guild (PPG), where he serves on the Board of Directors and Steering Committee and chairs the Advocacy Committee and The Shock-Free Coalition ( shockfree.org ). Don produces and co-hosts a weekly radio show and podcast, The Woof Meow Show, that airs on Z62 Retro Radio WZON (AM620) and WKIT 103.3-HD3 and is streamed at http://bit.ly/AM620-WZON every Saturday at 9 AM. Podcasts of the show are available at http://bit.ly/WfMwPodcasts/, the Apple Podcast app, and Don’s blog: www.words-woofs-meows.com.  The opinions in this post are those of Don Hanson.

©11NOV21, Donald J. Hanson, All Rights Reserved
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Why Is it Suddenly So Difficult to See the Veterinarian? What Can I Do If My Pet Has a Healthcare Emergency?

< A version of this article was published in the NOV2021 issue of Downeast Dog News>

< Updated 01NOV21 >

< A short link for this page – https://bit.ly/2021VetCrisis >

Some of my clients have commented on the long lead times to get appointments with their veterinarian for several months. In addition, new clients that have just moved to the area have indicated that many local veterinarians are not accepting new patients at this time. There were also rumors of the Eastern Maine Emergency Veterinary Clinic (EMEVC) not being open some nights and turning patients away because they did not have enough staff to see everyone. So, on Sept. 27, When EMEVC announced that they would be closed on Mondays and Tuesdays until further notice, I started to ask my friends in the veterinary community what was going on. What I learned was alarming.

After talking with colleagues throughout Maine and the USA, I discovered a nationwide shortage of veterinarians, technicians, and assistants. The American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) recently addressed this topic in an article in the JAVMA News entitled “Are we in a veterinary workforce crisis?” While some have speculated that this was due to a massive increase in pet adoptions due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the data reported in JAVMA does not support this conclusion; “The number of pets adopted from shelters in 2020 was the lowest in five years, based on data from over 4,000 shelters across the country.”

The data does indicate …veterinarians saw fewer patients per hour and average productivity declined by almost 25% in 2020, compared with 2019.” The JAVMA News article suggests a significant drop in productivity directly resulting from necessary changes in how veterinary practices operated due to the COVID-19 pandemic. As with other professions, the pandemic has increased stress levels and a loss of staff due to illness, a need to care for family members, or burnout.

The article in JAMA News suggests several things the veterinary profession can do to change this situation, but none will happen quickly. Additionally, society is still feeling the effects of COVID-19. With cases increasing again, it is quite possible things will worsen before they get better.

Those who share our lives with pets care deeply about their health, as does the entire veterinary and professional pet care community. I believe the best thing we can do as a like-minded community is to commit to working together to resolve this crisis. Too many people have used COVID to divide us as a society; it’s time for pet guardians to set an example for the rest of the world. Let’s show the world how to work together as a compassionate, caring team that is as concerned about the wellbeing of others as much as themselves. This is how we can start:

  • Be kind, patient, and helpful to others.
  • If you have not already done so, establish a relationship with a local veterinarian. Ask them what level of care they can provide if area emergency clinics are unavailable BEFORE you have an emergency.
  • Ensure you have contact information for all area emergency clinics readily available if the closest is closed.
  • Take a pet first aid class to better prepare to care for your pet in a crisis. An excellent course is offered online by the Pet Professional Guild. [ FMI – https://www.petprofessionalguild.com/Learnpetfirstaid ]
  • Keep all of your pet’s veterinary records so that they are readily available if you need to see another veterinarian. Take those records with you if you travel with your pet.
  • Every time you see your veterinarian, they probably send you home with a report indicating when your pets will be due for their next vaccinations and exams. Don’t wait until the last minute to schedule those appointments. Also, keep that information readily available so that you can provide it to your daycare, boarding facility, dog trainer, and groomer without having to call your very busy veterinarian for another copy.
  • Keep your pets healthy. Make sure that they have adequate and appropriate physical exercise and mental enrichment. Feed them healthy food and do not let them become obese. Provide them with medications as prescribed and order prescription refills well in advance. Please, do not use aversive training tools [ shock, prong & choke collars] that can cause physical or emotional injury.
  • Before embarking on a non-regular activity with your pet, assess their health and age and review the risk of that activity. Is your pet up to it, and are you ready to do what’s necessary if your pet has a healthcare emergency?
  • Be kind, patient, and helpful to others.

References

Are we in a veterinary workforce crisis?, JAVMAnews, Sept. 15, 2021 – https://www.avma.org/javma-news/2021-09-15/are-we-veterinary-workforce-crisis

________________________________________________________________________
Don Hanson is the co-owner of the Green Acres Kennel Shop ( greenacreskennel.com ) in Bangor, Maine, where he has been helping people with their pets since 1995. He is also the founder of ForceFreePets.com, an online educational resource for people with dogs and cats. Don is a Bach Foundation Registered Animal Practitioner (BFRAP), Certified Dog Behavior Consultant (CDBC), Associate Certified Cat Behavior Consultant (ACCBC), and a Certified Professional Dog Trainer (CPDT-KA). He is a member of the Pet Professional Guild (PPG), where he serves on the Board of Directors and Steering Committee and chairs the Advocacy Committee and The Shock-Free Coalition ( shockfree.org ). Don produces and co-hosts a weekly radio show and podcast, The Woof Meow Show, that airs on Z62 Retro Radio WZON (AM620) and WKIT 103.3-HD3 and is streamed at http://bit.ly/AM620-WZON every Saturday at 9 AM. Podcasts of the show are available at http://bit.ly/WfMwPodcasts/, the Apple Podcast app, and Don’s blog: www.words-woofs-meows.com.  The opinions in this post are those of Don Hanson.

©[email protected], Donald J. Hanson, All Rights Reserved
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