Shared Blog Post – What My Dog Taught Me About Consent

This post by Jenny Efimova from The Happy Dog Blog discusses how the author, an advocate for trauma survivors of domestic and sexual violence learned that the same principals she used with people, “meeting them where they are” are every bit as important when working with her new dog. These two paragraph say it all, but please read the entire article.

The power imbalance in our relationship with our dogs is vast. We control every solitary aspect and resource in their lives. Conventional dog training reinforces this imbalance and encourages us to use power and control as the model of how we relate to our dogs. But just because things have always been this way, doesn’t mean they have to be.”

Just because I could have made Larkin do what I wanted him to, doesn’t mean I should have. Just because we can force someone into compliance, doesn’t make it right. Force, fear, and coercion are not values consistent with any healthy relationship, be it with our friends, family, significant others, children, or animals.”

Having read Efimova’s post on Thanksgiving Day, I must add that I am very thankful that more and more trainers are abandoning training based on pain, force, and fear all of the time. Thank you, Jenny, for sharing your wisdom and helping to spread the word.

You can read the entire article at http://thehappydogbrookline.com/blog/2018/11/12/what-my-dog-taught-me-about-consent

Recommended Resources

Articles on Don’s Blog

( http://www.words-woofs-meows.com )

Accepting the Pet You Have http://bit.ly/AcceptingYourPet

 

Podcast – The Eastern Area Agency on Aging Furry Friends Food Bank and Green Acres’ 2018 Annual Fundraiser

< Click to Listen to Podcast >

In this episode of The Woof Meow Show from November 17th, 2018, Kate and Don talk with Kelly Adams and Mike Trafton about the work of the Eastern Area Agency on Aging a non-profit agency serving seniors in  Penobscot, Piscataquis, Hancock, and Washington counties since 1973. We discuss EAAA’s many programs and then focus on the Furry Friends Food Bank, a program that helps seniors feed their pets. Don addresses the many benefits of keeping pets and seniors together and explains why supporting the Furry Friends Food Bank with an annual fundraiser is so important to the team at Green Acres Kennel Shop. All of the pet food distributed through the Eastern Area Agency on Aging is donated by kind, caring individuals. To them, we say “Thank you!”

We hope that after you listen to the show or podcast that you will want to donate our annual fundraiser. You can learn more at www.greenacres-donate.com

You can learn more about the Eastern Area Agency on Aging at https://www.eaaa.org/

You can learn more about the Eastern Area Agency on Aging Furry Friends Food Bank at https://www.eaaa.org/furry-friends-food-bank/

You can hear The Woof Meow Show on Z62 Retro Radio, AM620, and WKIT HD3 at 9 AM on Saturday. If you are not near a radio, listen on your computer at http://streamdb7web.securenetsystems.net/ce/index.cfm?stationCallSign=WZON or your smartphone or tablet with the free WZON 620 AM app. A podcast of the show is typically posted immediately after the show. You can download this show and others at http://woofmeowshow.libsyn.com/ and the Apple iTunes store.

< Click to Listen to Podcast >

©18NOV18, Donald J. Hanson, All Rights Reserved
< Click for Copyright and Use Policy >

Podcast – Cold Weather and Holiday Tips for Pets – 2018

< Click to Listen to Podcast >

In this episode of The Woof Meow Show from November 10th, 2018, Kate and Don discuss the change in the seasons and how reduced daylight, lower temperatures, snow and ice, and the hectic holiday season affects our pets. They will offer several suggestions on how you can keep your pet safe and happy.

You can find an article that corresponds to this podcast at http://bit.ly/ColdWeatherHolidayTips

You can hear The Woof Meow Show on Z62 Retro Radio, AM620, and WKIT HD3 at 9 AM on Saturday. If you are not near a radio, listen on your computer at http://streamdb7web.securenetsystems.net/ce/index.cfm?stationCallSign=WZON or your smartphone or tablet with the free WZON 620 AM app. A podcast of the show is typically posted immediately after the show. You can download this show and others at http://woofmeowshow.libsyn.com/ and the Apple iTunes store.

< Click to Listen to Podcast >

 

Recommended Resources

Articles on Don’s Blog
( http://www.words-woofs-meows.com )

Seasonal Issues – Cold Weather and Holiday Tips for Petshttp://bit.ly/ColdWeatherHolidayTips

 

 

©10NOV18, Donald J. Hanson, All Rights Reserved
< Click for Copyright and Use Policy >

Keys to Successfully Training Your Dog

< DRAFT >

This article is a work-in-progress but if you attended my seminar at the P.A.W.S. Animal Adoption Center on 10NOV18, I wanted you to have at least an outline of what I discussed. I encourage you to check back at this link < http://bit.ly/DogTrainingKeysToSuccess > as I finalize this article.

Recognize That Your Dog Is A Sentient Being with Feelings

Dogs are thinking and emotional creatures. They clearly demonstrate positive feelings such as happiness, joy, and contentment. A dogs emotions can also have a negative nature, like anxiety, sadness, fear, and anger. Whether positive or negative, the emotions of you and your dog can both affect training. Make sure that both of you are in a positive and healthy emotional place before beginning any training session. Take the time to learn how your dog expresses their emotions. < FMIIntroduction to Canine Communication – http://bit.ly/CanineComm >

Recognize That Training Will NOT Resolve Negative Emotions

Training a dog to sit, or down, or to come when called will not typically resolve the dogs fear or anger. Asking a dog to do something counter to their emotional instincts may in fact make their emotional response more severe. This is often misunderstood by trainers, veterinarians, and shelters or rescue groups. Those that are unaware may suggest that a dog with aggression or reactivity issues towards dogs or other people, or both will improve with obedience training. While such training can be wonderful for helping an unruly dog to learn manners to make them easier to live with, it will not inherently make their fear go away or their anger dissipate. If a dog is reacting to people or other dogs, putting them in an environment where they are confronted by their triggers may in fact make their reactive behavior become more likely and more intense. Dogs and the people who love them can be helped but they would be better off working with a Certified Dog Behavior Consultant (CDBC) or a veterinarian accredited by the American College of Veterinary Behaviorists (ACVB). It is also imperative that no aversive of any kind are used with these dogs as a response to their reactivity or aggression.
< FMI – What Is A Pet Behavior Consultant?  http://bit.ly/WhatIsPetBhxConsulting >

< FMI – Reward Based Training versus Aversiveshttp://bit.ly/RewardVSAversive >

Accept the Dog That You Have

When you get a dog, you may have certain goals and ambitions for that dog. Your dog may have a different agenda. It is important to recognize that not every dog will be the dog we want them to be. When I brought my Golden Retriever Tikken home, it was with the goal and the hope that she and I would eventually compete in agility. Tikken had no real interest in agility so I found something else for her to do that she enjoyed, being a therapy dog and visiting seniors and children. < FMIAccepting the Pet You Have http://bit.ly/AcceptingYourPet >

Work As A Team & Be Consistent – ALWAYS!

Training your dog will be much easier if you and your dog have a relationship based on mutual trust and acceptance and the simple fact that you enjoy being with one another. The old model of dog training was based on the idea that you and your dog were on two different teams. I can tell you that after twenty-three plus years of working with people and their dogs, those that view themselves as being on the same team and working together are not only happier but they are also more successful.

If your dog lives with more than one person, or frequently is around other people, you need to recruit those people to join the team and to work with you and your dog. It only takes one person around your dog to undo what you and your dog have accomplished together. You know that one person that continues to encourage and reward your dog for jumping up on them? They are not helping. Even extended family members, those that might only see your dog every couple of months, can and should be part of the training process.

Consistent rules, training methods, and cues are essential to successfully training your dog. All those involved need to understand and be doing things in the same manner.

< FMIWhat Is Dog Training?http://bit.ly/WhatIsDogTraining >

ALWAYS – Manage to Prevent Behavior You Do Not Want

At some point, almost all dogs will exhibit a behavior we do not like. While we do not need to accept these behaviors, in most cases, we do not always need an elaborate training solution to stop the behavior. Sometimes the simplest and most effective solution is to use are allegedly more powerful brains to develop a strategy to prevent the behavior. For example, if our dog is anxious and uncomfortable around the grandchildren when they visit once a year, keep the dog in another room with their favorite toys or board them when the grand kids come to visit.

Many of the behaviors we do not like, such as jumping, are inadvertently rewarded by us because we give the dog attention whenever they exhibit the behavior. Attention can be looking at the dog, talking to them, or touching them. The same often happens if you have a dog that steals socks. They can quickly learn that stealing socks from the floor or the laundry basket results in a rousing game of chase. Since they love the game, they quickly learn exactly what to do to get you to play. Would it not be easier just to keep the socks somewhere the dog cannot get to them? As Ben Franklin once said, “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.”

ALWAYS Focus on Rewarding Behavior You Like

Equally important to ignoring undesirable behavior is the need to reward behavior you like. A reward can be many things and will vary from dog to dog, but in most cases, it will be food. If you ignore the dog when they jump up on you and instantly reward them with a tiny morsel of food the instant they have all four feet on the ground, they will learn much faster. One of the most frequent errors I see people make when training there dog is to failing to reward behavior, or to stop rewarding the behavior before it is firmly established.

Do NOT Get Stingy with Rewards & Treats

Directly related to rewarding behavior is the quality of the treat you are using. Just as most people would find a piece of fine chocolate more rewarding than a stale saltine cracker, most dogs will find a tiny piece of meat more valuable than the largest dog biscuit.

The frequency of the reward is also important, especially when training in more distracting environments or when working on more difficult behaviors like walking on a loose leash. If you are not making progress, try rewarding more frequently.

NEVER Forget to Reward Your Dog For Just Being Good

Sadly, it seems to be human nature, mine included, to be more likely to react when our dog is doing something we do not want than it is to acknowledge desired behavior with a reward. If you enjoy your dog when they are lying at your feet or calmly sitting in your lap, do not forget to reward them. If our employer forgot to pay us, would we be happy? Remember, behaviors that are rewarded consistently will be consistently repeated.

Be Thoughtful About the Cues You Use for Behavior

People like to talk hoping their dog will listen and perform a requested behavior, while dogs like to watch not understanding the need for all the chatter. Remember dogs are visual creatures. Start by training a visual cue before you even think about adding a verbal cue. Do not add a verbal cue until the visual cue is reliable; the dog responds 90 times out of 100 in any environment, context or situation. Dogs typically never develop a reliable response to a cue because people do not adequately train the cue and do not sufficiently reward the desired behavior.

Visual and verbal cues need to be consistent among all of those training the dog; they need to look the same. Remember your dog is great at discriminating tiny differences while they generalize poorly. I also find that many people like to give visual cues like a “fast-talking” urbanite that has consumed five Red Bulls too many. Or alternatively, a visual cue where the individual giving the cue has so many moving body parts, it looks like a pitcher winding up to win the World Series. Make your visual cues slow, deliberate, and simple.

Consistency is equally important with verbal cues. There is a difference between: “sit”, “siiiit,” “sit sit, sit?” and “can you sit?” Again, keeping a verbal cue short, deliberate, and simple will make training easier. Also, make sure a verbal cue for one behavior does not sound like that for another behavior.

ALWAYS Keep Training FUN! – ALWAYS!

If a training session stops being fun for either you or your dog, STOP and go do something you will both enjoy. If that is not possible, STOP and seriously evaluate why training is no longer fun.

Back when I first started training dogs professionally, I was still taking my Cairn Terrier Gus to classes on a regular basis. At one point, Kate, our class instructor, witnessed what was probably the least enthusiastic recall she has ever seen. Gus and I were at opposite ends of our field when I gave him his cue to come. He came but at the slowest pace possible, acting like he wanted to do anything but come to me. At the end of the class, after the other students had left, Kate took me aside and politely kicked us out of class. She observed that neither Gus nor I were having fun and that training was damaging our relationship. She suggested we just go and have fun. It was the last class Gus and I were part of, and we had a great relationship the rest of his life. Thank you Kate for such good advice and your honesty!

Work with a Force-Free Certified Professional Dog Trainer

No matter how many dogs you have trained or how many training classes you have attended, I would encourage you to work with a Force-Free, Certified Professional Dog Trainer (CPDT) every time you bring a new dog into your home. Such an individual has proven their knowledge experience through a rigorous examination and will typically have experience with more dogs and a wider variety of breeds and temperaments than you ever will. They should also be committed to force-free, fear-free, and pain-free training, as any other type of training will be counter-productive. Even though I am a CPDT I take my dogs through classes taught by others. Many of my colleagues do the same.
< FMIHow to Choose a Dog Trainerhttp://bit.ly/HowToChooseADogTrainer >

 

A Force-Free Certified Professional Dog Trainer will:

  • Help you understand your dog’s physical, mental and emotional needs.
  • Teach you about the myths and facts about dog behavior.
  • Help you to understand how your dog communicates.
  • Teach you how to most effectively and efficiently teach and reward behaviors.
  • Help prevent you from unintentionally rewarding undesired behaviors.
  • Coach and reward you on what you are doing, because it is not just your dog that is learning.
  • Teach you the importance of being proactive and not just reactive.
  • Help you set realistic expectations for your dog, you and your family, and your situation.
  • Show you the benefit of making training FUN! for both you and your dog.

In addition to teaching people how to train their dogs, I also help people that have dogs with often extremely serious behavioral issues such as aggression and separation anxiety. In my twenty-three years of training and working on behavioral cases, the vast majority of dogs I have seen for behavioral issues have never been trained. Training, when done proactively, can prevent behavioral issues.

Recommended Resources

Articles on Don’s Blog
( http://www.words-woofs-meows.com )

Introduction to Canine Communication – http://bit.ly/CanineComm

What Is A Pet Behavior Consultant? – http://bit.ly/WhatIsPetBhxConsulting

Reward Based Training versus Aversiveshttp://bit.ly/RewardVSAversive

Accepting the Pet You Have http://bit.ly/AcceptingYourPet

What Is Dog Training?http://bit.ly/WhatIsDogTraining

How to Choose a Dog Trainerhttp://bit.ly/HowToChooseADogTrainer

 Podcasts from The Woof Meow Show
( http://www.woofmeowshow.com )

©9-Nov-18, Donald J. Hanson, All Rights Reserved
Click for Copyright and Use Policy >

Understanding Dog Behavior, How Dogs Learn, and the Most Humane (Best) Ways to Train Them – 10NOV18

A seminar for the P.A.W.S. Animal Adoption Center in Camden, Maine

< Last Updated – 9NOV18 – 9:01PM >

< short link to this page – http://bit.ly/PAWS-Camden-10NOV18 >

On Saturday, November 10thth, Don Hanson of the Green Acres Kennel Shop presented a seminar for the P.A.W.S. Animal Adoption Center of Camden, Maine entitled Understanding Dog Behavior, How Dogs Learn, and the Most Humane (Best) Ways to Train Them. This blog article contains links to articles and podcasts that may be used as a reference to material presented at the seminar.

Articles on Don’s Blog
( http://www.words-woofs-meows.com )

Our Responsibilities to Our Dog(s) – Brambell’s Five Freedoms

Helping Your Dog Thrive – Brambell’s Five Freedoms – Part 1, Freedom from Hunger and Thirsthttp://bit.ly/Brambell-Hunger-Thirst

Helping Your Dog Thrive – Brambell’s Five Freedoms – Part 2, Freedom from Discomfort http://bit.ly/Brambell-Discomfort

Helping Your Dog Thrive – Brambell’s Five Freedoms – Part 3 Freedom from Pain, Injury or Diseasehttp://bit.ly/Brambell-Pain-Injury-Disease

Brambell’s Five Freedoms – Part 4 – The Freedom to Express Normal Behavior – http://bit.ly/Bramble-NormalBehavior

Brambell’s Five Freedoms – Part 5 – The Freedom from Fear and Distresshttp://bit.ly/Brambell-Fear-Distress

Brambell’s Five Freedoms – Parts 1 thru 5 as a printable PDF filehttp://bit.ly/Brambell-1thru5-PDF

The PPG and AAHA – Making A Kinder World for Dogshttp://bit.ly/PPG-AAHA-BHX

Anxiety & Fear

Alone Traininghttp://bit.ly/AloneTraining

Crate Habituation to Reduce Anxietyhttp://bit.ly/CrateHabituation

Help! My Dog is Aggressive, Reactive, Fearful, Anxious, etc. – What do I do? – WWM – APR2017 – http://bit.ly/HelpDogAggx

How Can I Tell When My Dog Is Anxious or Fearful? – http://bit.ly/DogsSignsofFear

Preventing separation anxiety – Teaching your dog to cope with being alonehttp://bit.ly/PrevSepAnx

Understanding, Identifying and Coping with Canine Stress – http://bit.ly/Canine-Stress

What Should I Do When My Dog Does Not Let Me Take Something They Have Stolen and Snaps or Tries to Bite Me? http://bit.ly/StealGuardGrowlSnap

What Should I Do When My Dog Growls?http://bit.ly/DogGrowls

Canine Behavior – Myths & Facts

Animal Welfare – Understanding Behavior; Why It Matters – http://bit.ly/AnimalWelfare-Behavior

Dangerous Dogs! – What Shelters, Rescues, Prospective Adopters, and Owners Need to Knowhttp://bit.ly/Dangerous-Dogs

Does My Dogs Breed Matter? – Parts 1, 2 & 3http://bit.ly/DoesDogBreedMatter

Dominance: Reality or Myth –  http://bit.ly/Dominance-RealityorMyth

Puppy Socialization and Habituationhttp://bit.ly/SocializationPuppy

Reward Based Training versus Aversiveshttp://bit.ly/RewardVSAversive

The Unintended Consequences of Shock Collarshttp://bit.ly/ShockCollars

Things I Wish I Had Known Before I Started Training Dogs – Gus, the Dominance Myth, An Alpha Roll, and a Damaged Relationship – WWM-SEP2018 – http://bit.ly/Things-Gus-Dominance

Understanding, Identifying and Coping with Canine Stress – http://bit.ly/Canine-Stress

What Should I Do When My Dog Does Not Let Me Take Something They Have Stolen and Snaps or Tries to Bite Me?http://bit.ly/StealGuardGrowlSnap

What Should I Do When My Dog Growls?http://bit.ly/DogGrowls

Dog Training

A Rescue Dogs Perspective – WWM JAN2016 – http://bit.ly/Rescue-Muppy

Barking – How Do I Get My Dog to Stop Barking? – http://bit.ly/BarkingHelp

Help! My Dog Gets Distracted (And Sometimes Wild and Crazy!!!) in Public – WWM-AUG2018 http://bit.ly/Distracted-Attention

How Do I Get My Dog to Walk Politely Instead of Pulling on the Leash?http://bit.ly/WalkingPolitely

How to Choose a Dog Trainerhttp://bit.ly/HowToChooseADogTrainer

Keys to Successfully Training Your Dog http://bit.ly/DogTrainingKeysToSuccess

 Reward Based Training versus Aversives –  http://bit.ly/RewardVSAversive

 Teaching the ATTENTION or LOOK Behavior http://bit.ly/GAKS-Attention

The misunderstanding of time by Nancy Tanner – http://bit.ly/Patience-Dogs

Things I Wish I Had Known Before I Started Training Dogs – Gus, the Dominance Myth, An Alpha Roll, and a Damaged Relationship – WWM-SEP2018 – http://bit.ly/Things-Gus-Dominance

What Is Clicker Training? – http://bit.ly/WhatIsClickerTraining

What Is Dog Training?http://bit.ly/WhatIsDogTraining

What Should I Do When My Dog Does Not Let Me Take Something They Have Stolen and Snaps or Tries to Bite Me?http://bit.ly/StealGuardGrowlSnap

What Should I Do When My Dog Growls?http://bit.ly/DogGrowls

Podcasts from The Woof Meow Show

( http://www.woofmeowshow.com )

Canine Behavior & Training

Podcast – We’re Getting A New Puppy (or Dog)! – part 1 – http://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2017/03/04/podcast-were-getting-a-new-puppy-or-dog-part-1/

Podcast – We’re Getting A New Puppy (or Dog)! – part 2 – http://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2017/03/11/podcast-were-getting-a-new-puppy-or-dog-part-2/

Podcast – How to choose a dog trainer – http://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2017/01/08/how-to-choose-a-dog-trainer/

Podcast – The Unintended Consequences of Shock Collars – http://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2017/10/21/podcast-the-unintended-consequences-of-shock-collars/

Podcast – Canine Behavior: Myths and Facts – http://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2016/03/27/podcast-canine-behavior-myths-and-facts/

Podcast – The Four Essentials to A Great Dog – http://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2016/02/21/podcast-the-four-essentials-to-a-great-dog/

Podcast – Dog Training Questions for Don and Kate with special guest host Dr. Mark Hanks – part 1– 12JUL15 – http://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2015/07/12/podcast-dog-training-questions-for-don-and-kate-with-special-guest-host-dr-mark-hanks-part-1/

Podcast – Dog Training Questions for Don and Kate with special guest host Dr. Mark Hanks – part 2– 19JUL15 – http://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2015/07/19/podcast-dog-training-questions-for-don-and-kate-with-special-guest-host-dr-mark-hanks-part-2/

Podcast – Dog Training Questions for Don and Kate with special guest host Dr. Mark Hanks – part 3 – http://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2015/07/27/blog-post-27jul15-podcast-dog-training-questions-for-don-and-kate-with-special-guest-host-dr-mark-hanks-part-3/

Podcast – Pet Behavior Counseling and Don and Kate with special guest host Dr. Mark Hanks –– http://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2015/01/10/podcast-pet-behavior-counseling-and-don-and-kate-with-special-guest-host-dr-mark-hanks/

Podcast –Pet Behavior, Vets & The AAHA Canine and Feline Behavior Management Guidelines with Dr. Dave Cloutier from Veazie Veterinary Clinic – http://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2016/03/13/podcast-the-woof-meow-show-pet-behavior-vets-the-aaha-canine-and-feline-behavior-management-guidelines-with-dr-dave-cloutier-from-veazie-veterinary-clinic/

Podcast – The Unintended Consequences of Shock Collars – http://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2017/10/21/podcast-the-unintended-consequences-of-shock-collars/

Podcast – Dog Bites and Fatalities with Janis Bradley – http://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2016/06/24/podcast-dog-bites-and-fatalities-with-janis-bradley/

 

Books ( In order of preference )

Canine Behavior & Training

On Talking Terms With Dogs: Calming Signals, Turid Rugaas, Dogwise Publishing, 2006, An excellent book on understanding a dog’s body language. Includes descriptions of how you can use your own body language to better communicate with your dog.

Dog Smart: Evidence-based Training with The Science Dog, Linda P. Case, CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform, 2018, If you love your dog, or if you work with people that love their dogs, you owe it to them to read Dog smart: Evidence-based Training with The Science Dog. 

Dog Sense: How the New Science of Dog Behavior Can Make You A Better Friend to Your Pet, John Bradshaw, Basic Books, 2011, 

A Kids’ Comprehensive Guide to Speaking Dog!: A Fun, Interactive, Educational Resource to Help the Whole Family Understand Canine Communication. Keep … Generations Safe by Learning to “Speak Dog!”, Niki Tudge, Joanne Tudge, 2017 

The Power of Positive Dog Training, Pat Miller, Howell Book House, 2001. I have been reading Pat Miller’s articles in the Whole Dog Journal for years and have loved everything she has written. She is a skilled and compassionate dog trainer who really knows how to communicate to dog owners through her writing. This book is a superb “basic dog book” for anyone with a dog, and I highly recommend it.

The Other End of the Leash – Why We Do What We Do Around Dogs, Patricia B. McConnell, Ph.D., Ballantine Books, 2002, An information-packed, immensely readable book. In it you will learn how to have a better relationship with your dog through better communications. Dr. McConnell clearly explains the manners in which dogs and their people communicate.

 For the Love of A Dog Understanding Emotion in You and Your Best Friend, Patricia B. McConnell, Ph.D., Ballantine Books, 2005, 2006, A superb review of emotions in both dogs and their people and how they bring us together and can rip us apart. Once again Dr. McConnell helps us to better understand our dogs and in doing so have the best possible relationship with them.

 Dogs: A new Understanding of Canine Origin, Behavior and Evolution, Raymond and Lorna Coppinger, University of Chicago Press, 2001, An evolutionary biologist and dog lover, Coppinger outlines the likely process that resulted in the longstanding canine-human relationship.

 

©9NOV18, Donald J. Hanson, All Rights Reserved
Click for Copyright and Use Policy >

 

 

Celebrating the 1st Year of the Shock-Free Coalition – +R Rocks

< A version of this article was published in the November 2018 issue of Downeast Dog News>

It was a year ago that I first wrote about the formation of the Shock-Free Coalition, an international initiative that “…believes that pets have an intrinsic right to be treated humanely, to have each of their individual needs met, and to live in a safe, enriched environment free from force, pain and fear. Members of the Shock-Free Coalition consider it to be their responsibility and utmost obligation to be vigilant, to educate, to remain engaged and work toward eliminating shock as a permissible tool so it is never considered a viable option in the training, management and care of pets.”    ( FMIhttp://bit.ly/BestFriendsAndShock ).

Since then the following has happened:

  • Niki Tudge, the founder of The Pet Professional Guild, appeared on The Woof Meow Show to discuss the Shock-Free Coalition ( FMIhttp://bit.ly/PodCastShockFree-NikiTudge-2017 )
  • Eleven pet care professionals representing thirteen businesses in the state of Maine joined together to run a full-page ad in the November 2017 issue of the Downeast Dog News announcing their support of the Shock-Free Coalition. ( FMIhttp://bit.ly/Shock-FreeME-Ad-NOV18DEDN )
  • In January of 2018 electric shock collars were banned in Scotland.
  • In February the Sun reported, “Electric shock pet collars to be banned for being ‘unnecessary and cruel’ forbidding their sale and use in the UK.”
  • The Shock-Free Coalition launched an improved website with chapters and regional coordinators in AZ, CA, CO, FL, HI, ME, OR, TX, Australia, Canada, England, Gibraltar, Ireland, Scotland, & Wales ( FMIhttps://www.shockfree.org/Chapters )
  • A paper published in Volume 25 of the Journal of Veterinary Behavior by Dr. Sylvia Masson et al. discussed electronic shock collars used to address barking, containment (underground fences), and remote training. The paper’s authors concluded “...there is no credible scientific evidence to justify e-collar use and the use of spray collars or electronic fences for dogs. On the contrary, there are many reasons to never use these devices. Better training options exist, with proven efficacy and low risk.” and recommend that the sale, use, and promotion of shock collars be banned.
  • The Pet Professional Guild (PPG) has designated Saturday, November 17th, 2018 as the first-ever International Day of Advocacy to celebrate its official launch of the Shock-Free Coalition one year ago. The focal point of the celebration will be Let’s Celebrate +R, a photo and video competition where pet professionals and enthusiasts can showcase the best of positive reinforcement-based pet training and education.

Let’s Celebrate +R

Let’s celebrate +R is a competition open to all who wish to advocate for force-free training by demonstrating their skills as a way to promote the educational message of pain-free, force-free, and fear-free training. Most people do not want to harm their dog and do not understand that shock collars work by causing physical and emotional pain and fear.

To participate in the International Day of Advocacy 2018, all you need to do is take a photo and/or make a short video and submit it to one of the Let’s Celebrate +R competition categories. There are three competition categories in both photos and videos. The contest will run from November 10th through November 24th and is open to all.

Winners and runners-up from each category will have the opportunity to win fabulous prizes! The winners from each of the six categories will then be forwarded to the final judging category, Best Overall Entry.

Each entry will receive 1) One 2018 competitor medal – mailed to you in November 2018, 2) your supporter certificate, 3) access to purchase a unique event participant T-shirt, and 4) eligibility to win the grand prize, which is The Pet Professional Guild Annual Convention Package (USA: Portland, Oregon – April 26-28, 2019). ( FMIhttps://petprofessionalguild.com/Lets-Celebrate-Plus-R )

To Learn More

If you want to learn more about shock collars and why the Shock-Free Coalition believes that their use, sale, and promotion should be banned,  I encourage you to visit these two sites – http://bit.ly/ShockCollars or https://www.shockfree.org/About/What-Experts-Say. The scientific evidence against the use of shock is overwhelming with no scientific evidence to support its use.

Please Join Us!

If you agree that using electric shock to care for, train or manage a pet is harmful and counter to having a rewarding relationship with a pet, please take the shock-free pledge at https://www.shockfree.org/chapters/Maine and if possible donate https://www.shockfree.org/Donate

Thank you for helping to make the life of pets free of pain, free of force, and free of fear.

Recommended Resources

Articles on Don’s Blog
( http://www.words-woofs-meows.com )

 The Unintended Consequences of Shock Collarshttp://bit.ly/ShockCollars

Is Your Dog Your Best Friend or a Family Member? – WWM-OCT2017 –   http://bit.ly/BestFriendsAndShock

Shock-Free Maine Coalition Ad in November 2017 Downeast Dog Newshttp://bit.ly/Shock-FreeME-Ad-NOV18DEDN

Podcasts from The Woof Meow Show
( http://www.woofmeowshow.com )

Podcast – The Unintended Consequences of Shock Collarshttp://bit.ly/ShockPodcast

Podcast – The Woof Meow Show: The Pet Professional Guild and the Shock-Free Coalition with Niki Tudgehttp://bit.ly/PodCastShockFree-NikiTudge-2017

Web Sites

Shock-Free Coalitionhttps://www.shockfree.org

About Don

Don Hanson is the co-owner of the Green Acres Kennel Shop ( greenacreskennel.com ) in Bangor, Maine where he has been helping people with their pets since 1995. He is a Bach Foundation Registered Animal Practitioner (BFRAP), Certified Dog Behavior Consultant (CDBC), Associate Certified Cat Behavior Consultant (ACCBC) and a Certified Professional Dog Trainer (CPDT-KA). Don is a member of the Pet Professional Guild (PPG) and is committed to PPG’s Guiding Principles and the Pain-Free, Force-Free, and Fear-Free training, management, and care of all pets. Don produces and co-hosts a weekly radio show and podcast, The Woof Meow Show heard on AM620 WZON and streamed at http://www.wzonam.com/ every Saturday at 9 AM. Podcasts of the show are available at http://woofmeowshow.libsyn.com/. Don also writes about pets at his blog: www.words-woofs-meows.com.

©1NOV18, Donald J. Hanson, All Rights Reserved
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