Dog Training – Teaching the ATTENTION or LOOK Behavior

< Updated 19APR19 >

OBJECTIVE: To teach your dog to look at you and make eye contact when given a single visual or verbal cue.

We teach this behavior for three reasons; 1) to get our dogs to focus on us so that we can more easily teach them, 2) to get our dogs to focus on us and to remain focused when distracted, and 3) to show our dogs that eye contact with us is safe and results in being rewarded.

Remember, for most dogs, direct eye contact is seen as being confrontational and something to be avoided. If your dog appears to be reluctant to make eye contact, please be patient while introducing this behavior. We also teach this behavior because it helps to train you the value of focusing on your dog. Lastly, I have found that a dog that has mastered the Attention behavior is quicker to learn the Heel and Leave It behaviors.

The best way to establish a solid foundation for the ATTENTION behavior is with the hand-feeding program outlined below. The more distractible your dog is, the more you will benefit from taking the time to go through the hand-feeding process.

Our Cairn Terrier, Gus, had always been very distracted by vehicles, especially large trucks. I used the hand-feeding program to improve his attention. By the 14th day, we were able to sit on our front porch, which is on a very busy street, and Gus would remain focused on me rather than pay attention to all the vehicles whizzing by.  To his last day, attention remained one of his strongest behaviors.

Building Attention through Hand Feeding

If you have a dog which has a hard time remaining focused on you, try hand feeding him for a few weeks. Instead of placing your dog’s bowl on the floor, you are going to sit down on the floor with the bowl in your lap. At least twenty pieces of kibble will come from your hands instead of the bowl. Follow this protocol:

DAY 1

  1. Select a quiet place with as few distractions as possible (no other pets, children, noises, ),
  2. Take a handful of kibble and offer it to your dog, allowing him to eat out of your hand. Do this for his entire ration of kibble.

DAYS 2 & 3

  1. Go to your quiet place. Take a handful of kibble and hold it in a closed fist in front of your dog, waiting for him to make eye contact. When he does so, allow him to eat out of your hand. Do this for his entire ration of kibble.

DAYS 4 through 7

  1. Go to your quiet place. Take a handful of kibble and hold it in a closed fist in front of your dog, waiting for him to make and maintain eye contact for at least 3 seconds. When he does so, say “Take It” and then allow him to eat out of your hand. Slowly increase the duration of eye contact required, but no more than 5 to 8 seconds. Do this for his entire ration of kibble.

DAYS 8 through 10

  1. Go to a place with a low level of distractions and repeat steps 1 through 4.

DAYS 11 through 13

  1. Go to a place with a moderate level of distractions and repeat steps 1 through 4.

DAYS 14 through 16

  1. Go to a place with a high level of distractions (park, an area near a busy street, a schoolyard, ) and repeat steps 1 through 4.

Hopefully, by now, you have significantly increased your dog’s attention and willingness to focus on you, and you have learned the importance of giving your dog 100% of your attention while training.

Putting ATTENTION on Cue

The ATTENTION behavior becomes even more useful when you can get your dog to offer the behavior when you request it.

When you start working on attention, do NOT concern yourself with your dog’s position (sit, down, stand, etc.) or where your dog is in relation to your location. Start in a room with no distractions and concentrate all of your efforts on the specific behavior of getting the dog to look at your face and make eye contact. If your dog tends to wander off, stand on your dog’s leash to keep them in place.

We do not use a verbal cue for this behavior until the dog is reliably responding to the visual cue in a wide variety of scenarios.

  1. Touch a treat to the dog’s nose and slowly move the treat so that it is right between your eyes. Hold the treat there and immediately click the instant your dog makes eye contact and then immediately give them the treat you had in your hand. Do this for about three repetitions. Note: Please do NOT taunt the dog by moving the treat back and forth.
  2. Without having a treat in your hand, bring your index finger up between your eyes and hold it in place, the treats are in your treat bag.  Immediately click when your dog makes eye contact, and then reach into your treat bag and give your dog a treat. Do this for about 3 to 5 repetitions.
  3. Move your body slightly so that you are in a different position relative to your dog, repeat step 3, clicking and treating the instant your dog makes eye contact. Remember, we are no longer luring the behavior with a treat at this point. Instead, we are cueing the action with a visual cue of the index finger between your eyes. We are still however clicking and treating each success.
  4. Start to work towards longer times of making eye contact (2 seconds, 5 seconds, etc.). As you work towards longer duration’s, move back and forth between shorter and longer times. It is essential to vary the amount of time to keep the dog interested and to make sure the dog will succeed. Note: Do not attempt to hold contact for longer than 8-10 seconds as this is a may make some dogs uncomfortable and cause them to look away.
  5. Continue to work on the behavior in different environments. Situate yourself so that at times the dog has to turn their head around to you to make eye contact.
  6. When your dog makes eye contact with you in a wide variety of environments, it is time to begin to work on getting and maintaining attention in the presence of distractions. We want to set our dog up for success so we will start with a low-level distraction at a distance where the dog is only minimally distracted. For purposes of providing an example, let’s say that your dog is distracted by people. Every time your dog sees a person they start to wag their tail and want to greet that person.
    1. Find a person that your dog will be happy to see and that will follow your instructions without improvising. If they cannot follow your instructions, find another person. You do not need the assistance of someone who will untrain your dog or teach them the wrong behavior.
    2. Arrange to meet that person in an area where you have successfully practiced attention with your dog without the presence of distractions. This might be at your home or could be somewhere else where you have had success with your dog.
    3. Arrive in the area and be standing in a predetermined location with your dog practicing attention as your friend arrives. Have them work with you at a distance where you will be able to maintain your dog’s attention. For some dogs, this meet be as little as 10 feet away, for others it may need to be fifty feet away. If your dog gets all worked up and will not focus you, have worked at too close of a distance. Go home and try again in a couple of days. If the dog will give you attention and maintain focus, work for about 5 minutes and then have your friend leave. Afterwards, do something fun that your dog enjoys as an extra reward.
    4. The next time you work with your dog, do the same as noted above but have your friend stand one foot closer. As long as you continue to have success, have your friend stand a foot closer each time you practice this behavior, as long as your dog does not get so distracted you cannot get them to focus on you.
    5. When your dog will give you attention and hold it with another person five feet away, it’s time to practice this with another person. The number of people you practice with is entirely up to you; however, the more you work on this behavior, the more you will benefit.
    6. Another way to work on teaching attention while your dog is being distracted by people is to find a large parking lot with a store, office or school where distraction will be present. Start working with your dog when the least amount of distractions are likely to be present. For example, when the facility with the parking lot is closed. Work as far away from the facilities entry as you can, rewarding your dog for giving and maintaining attention. As long as you and your dog are being successful, gradually change the time you are practicing to one when more people are present.
    7. It seems to be human nature to be patient and to want to like “one giant leap for mankind.” Unfortunately, that often causes our training plan to blow-up in our face. You are much more likely to succeed in training attention if you take baby steps to ensure your success.
  7. When your dog reliably offers the attention behavior in several different environments, while in the presence of distractions, you can start to add a verbal cue to the behavior. As with all cues, we want something short, typically no more than one syllable, and a verbal cue that does not sound anything like any of your other cues. I prefer the word “Look.”
  8. To introduce the verbal cue, say the word “LOOK” right before offering the visual cue. When your dog makes eye contact with you click and treat. Practice presenting the verbal cue in a wide variety of environments, eventually slowly adding higher levels of distraction.

©2018, Donald J. Hanson, All Rights Reserved < Click for Copyright and Use Policy >

 

Behavior Consulting – Keeping A Daily Journal

To help resolve a behavioral issue (anxiety, aggression, reactivity, etc.) with your pet, we first need to understand it. One way we can get a better understanding of what is going on will depend on your observations of your pets behavior on a daily basis. The best way for you to communicate that information to is is by keeping a daily journal. We suggest that you dedicate a computer file or notebook for this purpose. If you keep your journal in a word processing file on your computer, it will make it easier for you to share it with us as we work with you.

Your journal should contain the following basic information:

  • General comments on your pets overall demeanor for that day.
  • General comments on your overall demeanor for that day.
  • A description of any positive events that occurred that day.
  • General comments on your overall day (hectic, relaxed, etc.).
  • A description of any undesirable behavior noticed, with as much detail as possible.
  • Any additional stressors that may have occurred that day or within the previous 24 hours (vet trips, children visiting, etc.).
  • An overall score for that day (1=very frustrating/difficult to 5=perfect).
  • Your goal for the next day.
  • If using the Bach Flower Remedies; the times that remedies are given, including any extra doses and why they were given (when appropriate).
  • The times that any other medications or supplements, prescribed or over-the-counter, that are being given for behavioral purposes, are given.
  • A description of any training sessions completed that day; to include the time of the sessions,  the behaviors you worked on, the people involved, the progress made, any difficulties encountered and other details.
  • A description of any desensitization and counter-conditioning sessions completed that day; to include the time of the sessions, the people involved, the environment in which they occurred, the progress made, any difficulties encountered and other details. [We will provide you with instructions on performing these sessions after your behavioral consultation. We suggest that you do not start these sessions until after meeting with us.]

We will ask you to bring this notebook with you for any future consultations or training sessions. Additionally, we may ask to have the opportunity to review this log book when refilling remedies so that we can make changes in the formulation should the need arise.

The following pages are examples of how one client completed daily journal entries.

Examples

Sunday, July 7

Bach @

  • 5:00 AM
  •  1:00 PM
  •  5:30 PM
  •  9:00 PM
  •   also extra at 2:30 PM

Rating (1-5): 4

Notes

  • Rex spent the morning with my parents. Rex was calm but lots of nervous walking until I came home.
  • Upon returning to Sunnydale Rex snapped at Fluffy 2 times while transitioning into the house. Fluffy was near Rex’s face.
  • Rex settled well after 10 minutes
  • Practiced recall (took a couple to get it)
  • Practice sit, down and stay outdoors – did well with the stay.
  • When I left the house in the AM Rex would not go in his crate

 

Monday, July 8

Bach @

  • 4:15 AM
  • 1:00 PM
  • 5:30 PM
  • 9:00 PM

Rating (1-5): 4

Notes

  • Quiet morning
  • Around 10 AM practiced
    • Sit
    • Stay
    • Down
    • Recall in house
  • Rex is responding well to lie down when in the kitchen or working in the house
  • Played hard outside with Fluffy at 12:00
  • Went for walk – lots of pulling

Tuesday, July 9

Bach @

  • 5:00 AM
  • 1:00 PM
  • 4:30 PM
  • 9:00 PM

Rating (1-5): 4

Notes

  • Great morning, very low key
  • Clicker trained
    • Paw touches
    • Sit
    • Stay
  • Went for walk – lots of pulling, at first, did well checking in during walk
  • Is slow to eat first few hand-fed bites

 

Wednesday, July 10

Bach @

  • 5:30 AM
  • 11:00 AM
  • 5:30 PM
  • 9:00 PM

Rating (1-5): 4

Notes

  • Walked in morning – reactive barking to a girl on a scooter. Stopped and waited for her to go by, no issue after.
  • Hand fed breakfast
  • Did Remedial Socialization in Piggly Wiggly parking lot – ignored all people – had chicken as treat
  • Walked before dinner
  • Had friend over
    • Introduced Rex second, Fluffy first
    • Barked 5-9x
    • Used treats to redirect towards me, away from friend
    • Very friendly with friend after 10 minutes

Thursday, July 11

Bach @

  • 5:30 AM
  • 5:30 PM
  • 8:00 PM
  • Missed one, busy day

Rating (1-5): 3

Notes

  • I was not home in the morning, but Tom said Rex had a good, quiet morning
  • Rex was very excited when I came home
  • Worked on sitting to greet with Fluffy
  • Rex snapped at Blazer while Tom and I had dinner – we put him outside and withdrew attention until we were done eating
  • Rex tried to keep Blazer from coming into the room where we had been eating.
  • Quiet rest of the night

 

Friday, July 12

Bach @

  • 5:00 AM
  • 11:00 AM
  • 6:30 PM
  • 9:00 PM

 

Rating (1-5): 5

Notes

  • Too hot for walk
  • Played outside a little – very hot
  • Clicker trained
    • Sit
    • Recall
    • Leave it
  • Worked on reactions to being startled
  • Rex’s behavior, while Tom and I had dinner, was much better

 

Recommended Resources

Articles on Don’s Blog (http://www.words-woofs-meows.com)

 

 

©2016, Donald J. Hanson, All Rights Reserved <Click for Copyright and Use Policy>

Product – The Thundershirt™

The Thundershirt™ is a patent-pending pressure wrap that applies a gentle, constant pressure on a dog’s torso. It is used to help alleviate anxiety due to; fear of thunder or fireworks, separation or travel, crate training, problem barking (when barking is a result of anxiety or stress), hyperactivity, and other causes of anxiety. It is available from a myriad of sources, and we have been selling it at Green Acres for a few years now.

When I first heard about the Thundershirt I was skeptical, but anxiety in a pet is a heart-wrenching issue and is often difficult to treat, so I knew it was worth a try. Plus there is a money-back guarantee. If you are not happy with the Thundershirt, just return it to the manufacturer within 45 days along with your receipt.

I cannot give you a detailed scientific explanation of why the Thundershirt works. It provides a gentle, constant pressure around your dog’s torso, and pressure of this type does seem to have a calming effect on the nervous system. For example, veterinarians often use pressure to relax cattle during the administration of vaccines; pressure shirts are often used with children with behavioral issues to relieve stress and gain focus, and for ages, mothers have held infants to provide comfort. When used as directed the Thundershirt cannot harm your dog and if it helps resolve their anxiety, why not try it?

In some cases the Thundershirt may be used by itself and in other cases the dog may benefit from also using a behavior modification program, Dog Appeasing Pheromone (DAP), Bach Flower Remedies, and veterinarian prescribed anti-anxiety medications.

At this time we have three Green Acres staff members using the Thundershirt with their dogs; one for thunderstorm issues, one for combined thunderstorm and travel issues, and one for general anxiety. All have noticed a marked improvement since using the Thundershirt.

These are some testimonials from the Thundershirt website:

“We’ve been using Thundershirt at my clinic, and the feedback from our clients is very positive. Thundershirt is a good alternative solution to try versus medications. And it will definitely ‘Do no harm’.”

Dr. Donald Heagren, DVM
Cornwallis Road Animal Hospital
Durham, NC

“Pressure wraps are an effective, non-invasive way to help dogs to feel more at ease. I like the Thundershirt especially because of its soft material, easy-to-apply Velcro closures, and low cost. I recommend this product to my training clients for thunderstorm phobias, nail trims, and a variety of other fears such as sounds, riding in the car, and generalized fear of walking outdoors. I wish the Thundershirt had been around when my thunder-phobic German Shepherd was alive. I’m glad dogs everywhere can now reap its benefits.“

Nicole Wilde, CPDT-KA

“Ratchet is one of the dogs rescued from Iraq by Operation Baghdad Pups. Through a partnership between Operation Baghdad Pups and Thundershirt, I was sent one in the mail. I’d have to say that I was skeptical about the claims… for about 15 seconds. Ratchet had problems with barking, anxiety, and fear of unfamiliar noises. He was particularly anxious around other dogs, having been a guard dog in Iraq. Suddenly, while wearing the Thundershirt, Ratchet seemed to gain new confidence. Other dogs didn’t worry him. Thunderstorms were just things that made the grass wet. Airplanes, repairmen, and even the cat that went for walks outside our apartment were no longer worries for him. He could sit on the balcony and enjoy the day without anxiety, and that made both of us believers! Thank you, Thundershirt!”

Georgia

 

 

©2016, Donald J. Hanson, All Rights Reserved <Click for Copyright and Use Policy>

Canine Body Language – How To Greet A Dog and What to Avoid – Dr. Sophia Yin

This poster from Dr. Sophia Yin illustrates how to greet dog and how not to greet a dog. If you have a dog that is shy or reactive towards people you and they should familiarize yourself with the material in this poster. You can download your own copy of the poster from Dr. Yin’s website at https://drsophiayin.com/blog/entry/preventing-dog-bites-by-learning-to-greet-dogs-properly/

How to Greet A Dog and What to Avoid

Body Language of Fear in Dogs – Dr. Sophia Yin

This poster from Dr. Sophia Yin illustrates how a dog may use it’s body to signal they are afraid. You can download your own copy of the poster from Dr. Yin’s website at http://info.drsophiayin.com/free-poster-on-body-language-in-dogs

Body Language of Fear in Dogs

Our Pets – In Memory of Louise

It is with great sadness that I report the passing of or cat Louise. This morning she was in her basket on the steps in the store, breathing but not conscious. She In Memory of Louise 400x400had been having a more difficult time the past couple of days and due to her age and health issues, we decided to help her across the Rainbow Bridge this morning.

Louise and her sister Thelma joined the Green Acres Kennel Shop family on May 15th, 2001. Louise was probably 2 to 3 years old at the time, and Thelma was about eight months of age. They were barn cats before joining our family, so their exact date of birth is unknown. We had decided we wanted a resident rodent patrol and also thought that clients would enjoy interacting with the cats

1st day at Green Acres
1st day at Green Acres

in the store. Paula found the two of them on a farm and brought them home to Green Acres. After a short discussion, we named them Louise and Thelma.

Louise liked people and liked being close, to the point of often being underfoot. If there were ever a lap cat, it was Louise. If you sat down on a chair in the store, she would typically be on your lap in seconds. In the first few years, she was with us when we had orientation

On the retail counter
On the retail counter

sessions for our Basic Manners classes; Louise would often sneak into the training room and move from lap to lap. If she was not on a lap, she’d often be on the retail counter or would find a spot in one of the cubbies under the counter.

Both Louise, and Thelma connected with many clients and all of our staff over the past fifteen years. Due to Louise’s need for medication the past few years for her thyroid and blood pressure, staff had an opportunity to experience her moods quite well. I am quite sure that everyone has his or her own Louise story to tell; Thelma & Louise Go for a Drive-JAN11 by Kaila Moore 750x800however, one of our employees, Kaila Moore decided to share hers in this drawing. Thank you, Kaila, it fits the girls well.

Unlike her sister Thelma, Louise just did not understand dogs. Where Thelma would just quietly walk away from them, Louise would stare, hiss and then run away as fast as she could. One day a dog decided to give chase and Thelma jumped down from the shelf she was sitting on and landed between the dog and Louise, defending her older, but smaller sister.

Many people always thought Louise was a kitten due to her diminutive size. Her tiny head and abbreviated tail always generated curiosity from those seeing her for the first time. As I mentioned, Louise was a barn cat before joining us. Being underfoot amongst cows led to her tail being stepped on and permanently shortened by a cow hoof. Her tail was almost totally healed when she joined us and its shortened length never seemed to bother her.

Louise also loved to sleep and could turn almost any spot into a bed, with or without Thelma.

Snuggling in the basket
Snuggling in the basket
Snoozing in the Furry Friends Food Bank collection basket
Snoozing in the Furry Friends Food Bank collection basket

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Snuggling with sister - Who needs two beds?
Snuggling with sister – Who needs two beds?
EPSON DSC picture
Making a bed in the rawhide rack

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It's Our Anniversary! (May 2013)
It’s Our Anniversary! (May 2013)
Snuggling under the retail counter
Snuggling under the retail counter

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Also high on Louise’s list of favorite things was food. She was always there at meal time and always ready for more. As she went through periods of becoming plump, she reminded many of us of a feline Buddha, hence her occasional nickname Buddha.

Louise was always there for her little sister Thelma and in the early days, they would play with other often although like most sisters they had their occasional spats. While they each had individual baskets for sleeping, more often than not they would crawl into a basket together even in the middle of a hot, humid summer day. When I checked them last night before going to bed, Louise was snuggled in basket sleeping and Thelma was lying in front of the basket watching over her. Perhaps she knew.

Farewell Louise. You enriched the life of many people, and I cannot think of a single day that you failed to generate many smiles. Please send our love to all of the rest of our pets waiting for us at the Rainbow Bridge.

I'm well balanced (NOV 2001)
I’m well balanced (NOV 2001)
Keeping the chair warm as I wait for a lap
Keeping the chair warm as I wait for a lap

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lying around is exhausting!
Lying around is exhausting!
Yes! I'm a paperweight.
Yes! I’m a paperweight.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On the wall at Castle Black watching for wildings
On the wall at Castle Black watching for wildings
Practicing martial arts with a balloon
Practicing martial arts with a balloon

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

©2016, Donald J. Hanson, All Rights Reserved <Click for Copyright and Use Policy>

Podcast – Pet Nutrition with Dr. Richard Patton

< Click to listen to the podcast>

02APR16-Pet Nutrition w-Dr Richard Patton 400x400If you want to learn how you can improve your pet’s health and extend their life just by changing what and how you feed them, you do not want to miss this show.

Kate and Don Interview animal nutritionist Dr. Richard Patton, author of Ruined by Excess, Perfected by Lack, the Paradox of Pet Nutrition and discuss the best way to feed our pets for optimal health. Don first heard Dr. Patton speak in the fall of 2015 and was not only impressed by Dr. Patton’s passion and breadth of knowledge on pet nutrition, a subject we are passionate about as well, but was equally impressed by Dr. Patton’s ability to take technical concepts about nutrition and explain them from a common sense perspective.

We start our discussion from these three points; 1) nutrition is never a crisis, but poor nutrition often impacts health and then can cause a medical crisis, 2) we need to accept that we can either have optimal nutrition or convenience and economy, but not both, and 3) we should never be afraid to feed less. From there we move to what Dr. Patton calls the 900lb gorilla in the room; the presence of excess soluble carbohydrates in pet food. As Dr. Patton states “The majority of our nutrition problems can be traced back to the feeding of excess soluble carbohydrates. So until we fix that, it’s kind of esoteric to get into an involved discussion about whether salmon is better than trout or kangaroo is better than alligator. My mantra is to reduce the caloric intake, particularly from soluble carbohydrates and starch and sugar.”

You can hear The Woof Meow Show on The Pulse AM620, WZON, and WKIT HD3 at 12 Noon on Saturday. If you’re not near a radio, listen on your computer at http://www.wzonthepulse.com or your smartphone or tablet with the free WZON 620 AM app. A podcast of the show is typically posted immediately after the show, and can be downloaded at www.woofmeowshow.com and the Apple iTunes store.

< Click to listen to the podcast>

Recommended Resources

Articles on Don’s Blog

Book Review – Ruined by Excess, Perfected by Lack – The paradox of pet nutrition by Richard Pattonhttp://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2016/03/16/book-review-ruined-by-excess-perfected-by-lack-the-paradox-of-pet-nutrition-by-richard-patton/

Reflections on 20 Years as a Pet Care Professional – Changes in Pet Food and Nutrition – part 1http://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2015/11/23/reflections-on-20-years-as-a-pet-care-professional-changes-in-pet-food-and-nutrition-part-1/

Reflections on 20 Years as a Pet Care Professional – Pet Food and Nutrition – part 2http://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2015/12/15/reflections-on-20-years-as-a-pet-care-professional-pet-food-and-nutrition-part-2/

Nutrition – Which Brand of Pet Food is the Best? – Part 1http://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2014/06/01/nutrition-which-brand-of-pet-food-is-the-best-part-1/

Nutrition – Which Brand of Pet Food is the Best? – Part 2http://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2014/07/01/nutrition-which-brand-of-pet-food-is-the-best-part-2/

Nutrition – Which Brand of Pet Food is the Best? – Part 3http://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2014/08/01/nutrition-which-brand-of-pet-food-is-the-best-part-3/

Nutrition – Why Rotating Diets Makes Sensehttp://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2012/05/04/nutrition-why-rotating-diets-makes-sense/

Nutrition – Determining True Pet Food Costshttp://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2008/11/08/nutrition-determining-true-pet-food-costs/

 

Podcasts from The Woof Meow Show (http://www.woofmeowshow.com)

Pet Food Myths – part 1 (Click to listen) – In part one of this two part series, Don and Kate discuss several myths and conceptions pet guardians have about pet food. The fact is that not all pet foods are the same and the quality varies greatly. Kate and Don reveal these myths and guide the listeners on how to evaluate their pet’s food so that they can provide their pet with optimal nutrition that fits their budget. First Air Date: 6JUN11

Pet Food Myths – part 2 (Click to listen) – In part two of this two part series, Don and Kate discuss several myths and conceptions pet guardians have about pet food. The fact is that not all pet foods are the same and the quality varies greatly. Kate and Don reveal these myths and guide the listeners on how to evaluate their pet’s food so that they can provide their pet with optimal nutrition that fits their budget. First Air Date: 13JUN11

©2016, Donald J. Hanson, All Rights Reserved <Click for Copyright and Use Policy>