Pet Nutrition – Grain-Free Foods and FDA Reports of Increased Heart Disease in Dogs

On July 12th the US Food and Drug Administration published a report online entitled FDA Investigating Potential Connection Between Diet and Cases of Canine Heart Disease. You can read the entire report by < clicking here >.

Since the FDA report was released, the mass media has been jumping all over this story causing concern for many pet parents. We believe this is unfortunate as the FDA report is anything but conclusive, nor is it backed by hard evidence.

So what should you do if you want to do the best for your dog?

  • Read the remainder of this article and get the “rest of the story.”
  • Know that there are many dog foods available that do not contain the ingredients that the FDA is concerned about, certain legumes and potatoes.
  • Do not be in a panic to immediately change what you are feeding, however, if you stop by we would be glad to introduce you to other dog food options that do not contain those ingredients.
  • Rotate your dog’s diet through several different protein sources and even brands of foods. Not sure how to do that, ask us. We have been recommending dietary rotation for many years. FMIhttp://bit.ly/DietRotation
  • Never stop reading the ingredient list on your pet’s food nor presume that all pet food companies are equal and are primarily concerned with your pet’s health.
  • Subscribe to our email newsletter, Don’s Words, Woofs and Meows blog, and “Like” and follow the Green Acres Kennel Shop Facebook page. We will be updating this story as we get more information in all three areas.

At Green Acres Kennel Shop we are committed to offering the best products for your pet’s nutritional needs. We do not add a pet food to our offerings without doing a great deal of research on the specific brand of food including the company behind it. No matter how popular a brand is, if we are not convinced that it offers sound nutrition, we will not sell it. If you have followed which brands we have carried over the years you know, we do not hesitate to drop a brand when necessary. We offer a wide variety of dog and cat foods from many brands in many formats; dry food (kibble), wet food (canned), freeze-dried raw, and frozen raw. Many do not include potatoes or peas. We will be watching this situation closely and providing updates through our email newsletter, Don’s Words, Woofs and Meows blog, and on our Facebook page.

The key concern addressed in the FDA report is that veterinarians have observed an increase of dogs presenting with canine dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). While certain breeds are genetically predisposed to DCM ( Great Danes, Boxers, Newfoundlands, Irish Wolfhounds, Saint Bernards, Doberman Pinschers, and American and English Cocker Spaniels ), some of the recent cases of DCM have occurred in breeds where DCM is atypical ( Golden Retrievers, Labrador Retrievers, Whippets, a Shih Tzu, a Bulldog and Miniature Schnauzers, as well as mixed breeds ). The FDA report does not indicate the total number of DCM cases reported.

The FDA report than goes on to strongly suggest that the rise in DCM may be due to the increased use of grain-free foods, specifically those containing high levels of certain legumes or potatoes. The report states “…but it is not yet known how these ingredients are linked to cases of DCM.” Perhaps it is just poor wording, but this statement appears to say that the increase in DCM is directly related to legumes and potatoes, yet there is no evidence that this is the case. While there may be a correlation, there is no evidence of causation, at least yet.

There has been an increase in the percentage of pet parents requesting and feeding grain-free diets in the past several years. There has also been an increase in tick-borne diseases and the use of powerful chemicals to control ticks. I am not suggesting there is a link to DCM and the chemicals we use for ticks; I am just pointing out that there are potentially many other changes in our dog’s lives and environment that may correlate to the increase in DCM. If evidence is discovered, that proves the increase in DCM is caused by the composition of our dog’s food that would also suggest a serious deficiency in the regulations for the testing of pet foods.

The pet food industry is watching this situation closely and does want to understand it and make changes if the ingredients used in grain-free foods are indeed the cause. On July 19th on Petfood Industry.com, Tim Wall shared this quote from Greg Aldrich, PhD, Kansas State University pet food program coordinator, president of consultancy Pet Food and Ingredient Technology Inc.; “We may be jumping to some conclusions and over zealous speculation about what really underlies the challenge with DCM as it relates to what the FDA statement has been. There are probably more questions than there are answers at this stage of the game.”

The FDA was a bit more clear in an interview with Petfood Industry.com where Anne Norris, FDA Center for Veterinary Medicine health communications specialist stated; “The FDA is still investigating individual ingredients under the legume, pulse or potato “umbrella. So, I would suggest not taking intuitive leaps beyond what is explicitly stated in our public notice right now… It is still early in the investigation and right now we’re simply notifying the public, practitioners, and manufacturers that we are observing a signal that warrants further study, The common thread seems to be legumes and/or potatoes as main ingredients in the food. Currently, it’s a correlative link, not a causative one. We’re hoping that after receiving data from pet owners and veterinarians, we will have more data to further inform our investigation.”

 

Key points in the FDA report.

  • The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is alerting pet owners and veterinary professionals about reports of canine dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) in dogs eating certain pet foods containing peas, lentils, other legume seeds, or potatoes as main ingredients. These reports are unusual because DCM is occurring in breeds not typically genetically prone to the disease.”
  • Canine DCM is a disease of a dog’s heart muscle and results in an enlarged heart. The underlying cause of DCM is not truly known, but is thought to have a genetic component. Breeds that are typically more frequently affected by DCM include large and giant breed dogs, such as Great Danes, Boxers, Newfoundlands, Irish Wolfhounds, Saint Bernards and Doberman Pinschers. It is less common in small and medium breed dogs, except American and English Cocker Spaniels. However, the cases that have been reported to the FDA have included Golden and Labrador Retrievers, Whippets, a Shih Tzu, a Bulldog and Miniature Schnauzers, as well as mixed breeds.”
  • Diets in cases reported to the FDA frequently list potatoes or multiple legumes such as peas, lentils, other “pulses” (seeds of legumes), and their protein, starch and fiber derivatives early in the ingredient list, indicating that they are main ingredients. Early reports from the veterinary cardiology community indicate that the dogs consistently ate these foods as their primary source of nutrition for time periods ranging from months to years. High levels of legumes or potatoes appear to be more common in diets labeled as “grain-free,” but it is not yet known how these ingredients are linked to cases of DCM. Changes in diet, especially for dogs with DCM, should be made in consultation with a licensed veterinarian.” [ Emphasis added ]

Recommended Resources

Articles on Don’s Blog ( http://www.words-woofs-meows.com )

< *Recommended to Read First >


*What do you feed your dog?
http://bit.ly/WhatDoYouFeedYourDog

*Pet Nutrition: Some Myths and Facts – My story with Gus – http://bit.ly/Gus-Nutrition

*Pet Nutrition – Should I Feed My Pet A Raw Diet? – http://bit.ly/ShouldIFeedMyPetARawDiet

*Nutrition – Why Rotating Diets Makes Sense – http://bit.ly/DietRotation

*Video – The Science and Dogma of Pet Nutrition with Dr. Richard Patton – A video of animal nutritionist, Dr. Richard Patton’s presentation, The Science and Dogma of Pet Nutrition, presented for Green Acres Kennel Shop in Bangor, ME on April 28th, 2016.  – http://bit.ly/Video-Dr-Richard-Patton

*Book Review – Ruined by Excess, Perfected by Lack – The paradox of pet nutrition by Richard Patton – http://bit.ly/RuinedByExcess-BookReview

*Book Review – Natural Nutrition for Cats: The Path to Purrfect Health by Kymythy Schultze – http://bit.ly/NatNutritionCats-BookReview

Reflections on 20 Years as a Pet Care Professional – Changes in Pet Food and Nutrition – part 1http://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2015/11/23/reflections-on-20-years-as-a-pet-care-professional-changes-in-pet-food-and-nutrition-part-1/

Reflections on 20 Years as a Pet Care Professional – Pet Food and Nutrition – part 2http://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2015/12/15/reflections-on-20-years-as-a-pet-care-professional-pet-food-and-nutrition-part-2/


Nutrition – Which Brand of Pet Food is the Best? – Part 1 –
http://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2014/06/01/nutrition-which-brand-of-pet-food-is-the-best-part-1/

Nutrition – Which Brand of Pet Food is the Best? – Part 2 – http://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2014/07/01/nutrition-which-brand-of-pet-food-is-the-best-part-2/

Nutrition – Which Brand of Pet Food is the Best? – Part 3 – http://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2014/08/01/nutrition-which-brand-of-pet-food-is-the-best-part-3/

Nutrition – Determining True Pet Food Costshttp://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2008/11/08/nutrition-determining-true-pet-food-costs/

Pet Nutrition – How Much Fat Is In Your Pet’s Food?  – http://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2014/10/12/pet-nutrition-how-much-fat-is-in-your-pets-food/

Pet Nutrition – New Zealand dog diet study a wake-up call for dog nutritionhttp://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2017/05/19/pet-nutrition-new-zealand-dog-diet-study-a-wake-up-call-for-dog-nutrition/

Pet Nutrition –Vital Essentials® Pet Foodhttp://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2016/08/14/pet-nutrition-vital-essentials-pet-food/

Shared Blog Post – FDA on a Witch Hunt Against Commercial Pet Food? A Little Spritz of This Makes Pet Food Far Saferhttp://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2016/11/28/shared-blog-post-fda-on-a-witch-hunt-against-commercial-pet-food-a-little-spritz-of-this-makes-pet-food-far-safer/

Pet Nutrition – From Dr. Karen Becker – A Vegetarian or Vegan Diet Is Not Healthy For Your Dog or Cathttp://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2015/09/27/pet-nutrition-from-dr-karen-becker-a-vegetarian-or-vegan-diet-is-not-healthy-for-your-dog-or-cat/

Podcasts from The Woof Meow Show ( http://www.woofmeowshow.com )

 < *Recommended You Listen to First >

*What do you feed your pets? – http://bit.ly/WhatDoYouFeedYourPets-Podcast

*Podcast – Pet Nutrition with Dr. Richard Patton – http://bit.ly/DrPatton-Podcast

*Podcast – Pet Fooled – A Look Inside A Questionable Industry with Kohl Harrington – http://bit.ly/WfMw-Pet-Fooled

 

 

©22-Jul-18, Donald J. Hanson, All Rights Reserved
< Click for Copyright and Use Policy >

Grooming – What Determines the Cost of Grooming A Dog

While most grooming salons have a base price for grooming specific breeds, it is typically only an estimate, and the cost to groom your dog may be higher or may even be lower. The cost to groom a dog is based on the amount of time it takes to complete the grooming process. Many factors determine the amount of time required to groom a specific dog. Those factors include:

  • Your dogs comfort with the grooming process. Green Acres Kennel Shop is committed to Fear-Free, Pain-Free, and Force-Free pet care. We will not intentionally cause discomfort or anxiety when grooming your dog which may mean we will need to proceed at a slower pace or may need to take regular breaks to keep your dog comfortable. In rare cases, we may need to break the grooming process up into several sessions or even refer you to our dog behavior consultant so you can also work on this at home.
  • Your dog’s behavior. The grooming process can make some dogs uncomfortable while, some may see it as just one big play session. These behaviors can increase the amount of time it takes to groom your dog. By starting mini-grooming sessions with a professional groomer while your puppy is in their critical socialization period, 8 to 16 weeks of age, you can minimize behavioral issues. During this time your puppy is very open to new things. After this period closes, new experiences are typically viewed as being dangerous, until proven otherwise.
  • Your dog’s age. Grooming requires your dog to stand for much of the process. That can be difficult for older dogs with orthopedic issues so that breaks may be necessary.
  • The condition of your dog’s coat at the time they are groomed. Any mats will need to be removed before your dog can be bathed. Eliminating mats can take time even for a dog that stands perfectly still and this process can take even longer with a wiggly dog. Trimming takes place before your dog is bathed and if your dog’s coat is dirty, it will require more breaks to change blades on the trimmers. A dirty coat dulls the blades. If fleas are found in your dog’s coat, additional bathing with a flea shampoo will be required, which will take extra
  • The length and type of your dog’s coat. Short-coated dogs take much less time to bath, brush out and dry. The longer the coat, the more time these processes take.
  • The type of cut you want. When cutting or trimming a dog’s coat, the type of cut can range from a simple, short all over to an elaborate show coat. The more elaborate the cut, the longer it will take. Also, remember, while your dog may be the same breed as the picture you show us, your dog’s coat may not be suitable for the type of cut you want.
  • Your dog’s size. Big dogs take longer to groom.

The best ways to reduce the cost of grooming your dog are:

  • Brush your dog with the correct tools, at least once per week, at home. Our groomer can offer guidance in selecting tools and provide instruction on how to brush your dog so that it is a pleasurable experience for both of you.
  • Do NOT bathe your dog before all mats are removed. Once a mat becomes wet it becomes much more difficult to remove.
  • Ask your veterinarian to recommend a flea preventative. Flea and tick preventatives sold by your veterinarian are much safer and more effective than any products that you can purchase over-the-counter or online. Also, since your veterinarian knows your dog’s health, as well as that of the other pets in your home, they can prescribe something that is safe for everyone in your home.
  • Have your dog professionally groomed on a regular basis? If you are providing all of the home grooming described above, the average time between professional grooms is about 4 to 6 weeks. Note that if you are not doing the home maintenance described above, you may need to see a professional groomer more often. Also, nails typically need to be clipped more frequently. If you can hear them going “click” and “clack” on the floor, the nails are too long.

©17JUL18, Donald J. Hanson, All Rights Reserved
< Click for Copyright and Use Policy >

Podcast – Things To Consider When Boarding A Pet-Part 1

< Click to Listen to Podcast >

In this episode of The Woof Meow Show from July 7th, 2018 Kate and Don start by discussing pet care options when you need to go away and cannot or do not, want to take your pet with you. They discuss the pros and cons of leaving a dog with family, a neighbor, a pet sitter or at a boarding kennel. They then consider what one should look for in a boarding kennel as well as reviewing typical requirements for boarding a pet. They explain how to acclimate your pet to being cared for at a boarding facility for the first time and address what you should and should not bring with you when you drop your pet off. Lastly, they start discussing group play for dogs.

You can hear The Woof Meow Show on Z62 Retro Radio, AM620, and WKIT HD3 at 9 AM on Saturday. If you are not near a radio, listen on your computer at http://www.wzonthepulse.com or your smartphone or tablet with the free WZON 620 AM app. A podcast of the show is typically posted immediately after the show and can be downloaded at https://www.greenacreskennel.com/woof-meow-show/the-woof-meow-show.html and the Apple iTunes store.

< Click to Listen to Podcast >

 

Contact Info

Green Acres Kennel Shop
1653 Union Street
Bangor, ME 04401
207-945-6841

www.greenacreskennel.com

https://www.facebook.com/GreenAcresKennelShop/

 

Recommended Resources

Articles on Don’s Blog ( http://www.words-woofs-meows.com )

Please Be Cautious When Choosing Who Cares For Your Petshttps://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2016/04/11/pet-care-services-please-be-cautious-when-choosing-who-cares-for-your-pets/

Traveling – Do you take the dog along or leave him with someone?https://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2016/04/11/traveling-do-you-take-the-dog-along-or-leave-him-with-someone/

Pet Care Options When You Go Away: Pet Sitter, Neighbor, Boarding Facilityhttp://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2015/09/01/pets-who-cares-for-them-when-you-are-away/

Selecting A Pet Care Provider – Yes! A Trend Towards Kinder and Gentler Professional Pet Care – Green Acres Kennel Shop’s “Pet-Friendly” Philosophy – Part 1http://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2015/04/02/yes-a-trend-towards-kinder-and-gentler-professional-pet-care-green-acres-kennel-shops-pet-friendly-philosophy-part-1/

 

Podcasts from The Woof Meow Show ( http://www.woofmeowshow.com )

Pet Care Options When You Go Away: Pet Sitter, Neighbor, Boarding Facilityhttp://traffic.libsyn.com/woofmeowshow/WoofMeowShow-2015-09-05-Pet_Care_Options_When_You_Go_Away.mp3

Selecting A Pet Care Provider – Yes! A Trend Towards Kinder and Gentler Professional Pet Care – Green Acres Kennel Shop’s “Pet-Friendly” Philosophy – Part 1http://traffic.libsyn.com/woofmeowshow/WoofMeowShow-2015-04-11-Kinder_Gentler_Pet_Care_Part-1_GAKS_Pet_Friendly.mp3

 

©08JUL18, Donald J. Hanson, All Rights Reserved
< Click for Copyright and Use Policy >

Shared Facebook Post – Don’t “Ace” the Fear

The Use of Acepromazine with Dogs

Yesterday I shared a Facebook post from and Veterinary Behavior Consultants of Alabama and Roverchase addressing the use of the sedative Acepromazine for treating firework, thunderstorm and noise phobias in dogs. The graphic from Facebook explains that “Ace” does not really resolve the dog’s anxiety and suggest you ask your veterinarian for a better, more humane alternative.

In this YouTube video [ https://www.youtube.com/watch?reload=9&v=6-GsmrFYHKk ] Dr. Karen Overall, a veterinary behaviorist, discusses Acepromazine in a presentation for the American Veterinary Society of Animal Behavior (AVSAB). She explains why Acepromazine is not good pharmacological support for thunderstorms or noise phobias and indicates that it actually can increase noise sensitivity.

 

Podcast-How Hemp-Derived Phytocannabinoid Nutraceuticals Can Help My Pets with Julianna Carella

< Click to Listen to Podcast >

In this episode of The Woof Meow Show from June 23, 2018 Kate and Don interview Julianna Carella, CEO and Founder of Treatibles and Auntie Dolores. We discuss the use of hemp-derived phytocannabinoid nutraceuticals and their ability to offer dogs relief from anxiety, arthritis, pain, inflammation, seizures, nausea, motion sickness and even their ability to help those with cancer. We discuss the science behind these products, their safety, and what one should look for when selecting a Phytocannabinoid Nutraceutical for their pet.

You can hear The Woof Meow Show on Z62 Retro Radio, AM620, and WKIT HD3 at 9 AM on Saturday. If you are not near a radio, listen on your computer at http://www.wzonthepulse.com or your smartphone or tablet with the free WZON 620 AM app. A podcast of the show is typically posted immediately after the show and can be downloaded at www.woofmeowshow.com and the Apple iTunes store.

< Click to Listen to Podcast >

Contact Info

Address: 1455 North McDowell Blvd, Suite B, Petaluma, CA 94954

Phone: (415) 579-2230

Website: https://treatibles.com/http://auntiedolores.com

Email: info@treatibles.com

Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/treatibles/https://www.facebook.com/AuntieDoloresEdibles/

Recommended Resources

Articles on Don’s Blog ( http://www.words-woofs-meows.com )

How Hemp-Derived Phytocannabinoid Nutraceuticals May Help Your Petshttp://bit.ly/BLOG-Hemp-CBD-PRO-for-pets

 

©23JUN18, Donald J. Hanson, All Rights Reserved
< Click for Copyright and Use Policy >

Podcast – Listener Questions No. 32

< Click to Listen to Podcast >

In this episode of The Woof Meow Show from June 16, 2018, Kate and Don answer questions from their listeners. Topics addressed include:

  1. At what age should I start training my dog?
  2. What are the most important things to teach my dog?
  3. Can my kids be involved in training our new dog?
  4. Will all cats do well being indoor-only cats?
  5. What are the best ways to bond with a new cat?
  6. What is the best way to get a dog used to being bathed and how often should I bathe my dog?
  7. My dog hates having their nails trimmed? What can I do?

You can hear The Woof Meow Show on Z62 Retro Radio, AM620, and WKIT HD3 at 9 AM on Saturday. If you are not near a radio, listen on your computer at http://www.wzonthepulse.com or your smartphone or tablet with the free WZON 620 AM app. A podcast of the show is typically posted immediately after the show and can be downloaded at www.woofmeowshow.com and the Apple iTunes store.

< Click to Listen to Podcast >

Recommended Resources

Articles on Don’s Blog ( http://www.words-woofs-meows.com )

What Is Dog Training?http://bit.ly/WhatIsDogTraining

Dog Training – A Rescue Dogs Perspectivehttp://bit.ly/Rescue-Muppy

How to choose a dog trainerhttp://bit.ly/HowToChooseADogTrainer

Podcasts from The Woof Meow Show ( http://www.woofmeowshow.com )

 

Podcast – The Importance of Training Your Dog and 2018 Classes at Green Acreshttps://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2017/12/10/podcast-the-importance-of-training-your-dog-and-2018-classes-at-green-acres/

Podcast – The Woof Meow Show – Pet Behavior, Vets & The AAHA Canine and Feline Behavior Management Guidelines with Dr. Dave Cloutier from Veazie Veterinary Clinichttps://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2016/03/13/podcast-the-woof-meow-show-pet-behavior-vets-the-aaha-canine-and-feline-behavior-management-guidelines-with-dr-dave-cloutier-from-veazie-veterinary-clinic/

 

©16JUN18, Donald J. Hanson, All Rights Reserved
< Click for Copyright and Use Policy >

Shared Blog Post – You’ll Never Know What Your Cat Is Capable of if You Ignore This – Kitten Socialization

In this blog post from June 19th, 2018, veterinarian Dr. Karen Becker discusses the importance of socializing and habituating a kitten between 8 and 15 weeks of age, a critical developmental period. If you are adopting a kitten from an individual, shelter, or rescue, you want to make sure they have been doing this, and you should ask for detailed specifics on what they have done. If they are not socializing the kittens, you may want to look elsewhere. –

FMIhttps://healthypets.mercola.com/sites/healthypets/archive/2018/06/19/kitten-socialization.aspx

Pet Health & Wellness – How Hemp-Derived Phytocannabinoid Nutraceuticals May Help Your Pets

< This Article Is Currently in the Process of Being Finalized >

< A version of this article was published in the July 2018 issue of Downeast Dog News >

< You may listen to a podcast on this topic which aired on The Woof Meow Show at – http://bit.ly/WfMw-Hemp-Podcast1 >

You may have noticed that the use of marijuana and hemp-based products are being promoted for medical and health reasons for

Muppy & Don 2017

both people and pets. Research indicates that phytocannabinoid nutraceuticals can be very useful in helping with allergies1, anxiety2,11, arthritis3,4,11, behavioral issues5,11, depression2, epilepsy and seizures5,6,11, inflammation7, joint health3,4, digestion, joint mobility11, nausea8,9, and pain relief and management10,11. Anecdotal evidence indicates cannabinoids may also be useful in increasing appetite, improving digestion, slowing tumor growth, and providing end of life comfort. A scientific report in the Spring 2016 issue of the Journal of the American Holistic Veterinary Medical Association (AHVMA) reviewed how 631 pet owners used cannabinoids with their pets12. Commonly reported benefits of cannabinoids were; provided pain relief, aided with sleep, helped relieve anxiety, offered nervous system support, reduced inflammation,  reduced seizures or convulsions, reduced vomiting or nausea, helped suppress muscle spasms, aided digestion, helped with thunderstorm or fireworks phobia, inhibited cell growth in tumors and cancer cells, and helped with skin conditions.

What is the difference between hemp and marijuana?

While hemp and marijuana are both plants in the Cannabis family, they are not the same. The appearance of these two plants are very different, as is how they are cultivated. Most importantly, the chemical makeup of marijuana and hemp is very different. Marijuana is probably best known for containing a cannabinoid called THC, the psychoactive ingredient in marijuana which can cause one to “get high.” Marijuana has a high THC content (5 to 35%) while the THC content of Hemp is less than 0.3%. THC content is critical as THC can be moderate to severely toxic to dogs13,14. Common signs of THC toxicity are: severe depression, walking drunk, lethargy, coma, low heart rate, low blood pressure, respiratory depression, dilated pupils, coma, hyperactivity, vocalization, and seizures.

What are phytocannabinoids?

Cannabinoids are substances that occur naturally in both hemp and marijuana. There are 66 different types of cannabinoids. One is THC, the psychoactive component of marijuana. Cannabidiol (CBD), is the most abundant of the cannabinoids and can make up as much of 45% of the resin extracted from the cannabis plant. CBD is believed to have anti-anxiety effects and may counteract the psychoactive effects of THC. Since there is now a CBD based drug undergoing clinical trials, the term PRO (Phytocannabinoid Rich Oil) is being used for phytocannabinoid nutraceuticals instead of CBD.

How do phytocannabinoids work?

All animals have an endocannabinoid system that works with the bodies physiological, neurological, and immunological systems. Our bodies produce endocannabinoids which fit into specialized receptors throughout the body. In the dog, CB1 receptors are found in the brain, gastrointestinal tract, lungs, muscles, reproductive organs, and vascular system. CB1 and CB2 receptors are found in the bone marrow, brain stem, gall bladder, liver, and pancreas. CB2 receptors are found in parts of the brain, bones, skin and the spleen. Cannabinoid receptors in your dog’s brain play a role in the Cerebral Cortex (memory, thinking, awareness, and consciousness), the Hypothalamus (metabolic processes, appetite), the Amygdala (regulation of emotions), the Hippocampus (memory and recall), the Basal Ganglia (motor skills and learning), the Cerebellum (muscle control and coordination), and the Brain Stem (reflexes, heart rate, blood pressure, pain sensation and muscle tone). Producing adequate numbers of endocannabinoids is essential to good health. When the body does not produce enough endocannabinoids due to poor health, we can supplement them with phytocannabinoids derived from hemp.

Are phytocannabinoids right for your pet?

Whether or not phytocannabinoids are right for your pet is something that only you can decide, and I would suggest you do so only after discussing their use with your veterinarian. At the end of 2017, the World Health Organization issued a report15 indicating that CBD exhibits no effects indicative of any abuse or dependence potential, and in several clinical trials has been shown to effectively treat seizures. Research suggests that CBD/PRO nutraceuticals may be useful in treating a number of other medical conditions and have a good safety profile.

Buyer Beware!

The buzz over CBD/Pro products is enormous, so it is a “seller’s market.” Whenever that happens, it is not uncommon for some unreliable companies to get into the business. Before adding these products to our offerings at our store, we did a great deal of due diligence to select a company with a known track record and a commitment to quality and education. I would advise you to spend some time doing your own research before you buy a product or, talk to your veterinarian or a pet care professional you trust. Whatever you do, do NOT use marijuana you are growing yourself or that you buy from the couple down the road. You could kill your dog.

Footnotes and References

 

1 Cannabinoid receptor type 1 and 2 expression in the skin of healthy dogs and dogs with atopic dermatitishttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22738050

2 Antidepressant-like and anxiolytic-like effects of cannabidiol: a chemical compound of Cannabis sativahttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24923339

3 The nonpsychoactive cannabis constituent cannabidiol is an oral anti-arthritic therapeutic in murine collagen-induced arthritishttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10920191

4 Involvement of the endocannabinoid system in osteoarthritis pain – https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24494687

5 Cannabidiol exerts anti-convulsant effects in animal models of temporal lobe and partial seizures – https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22520455

6 The cannabinoids as potential antiepilepticshttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6975285

7 Cannabinoids, endocannabinoids, and related analogs in inflammationhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19199042

8 Cannabidiol, a non-psychoactive component of cannabis and its synthetic dimethylheptyl homolog suppress nausea in an experimental model with ratshttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11973447

9 Cannabidiol, a non-psychotropic component of cannabis, attenuates vomiting and nausea-like behaviour via indirect agonism of 5-HT(1A) somatodendritic autoreceptors in the dorsal raphe nucleushttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21827451

10 Non‐psychoactive cannabinoids modulate the descending pathway of antinociception in anaesthetized rats through several mechanisms of action – https://bpspubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1476-5381.2010.01063.x

11 The Effective Pain Treatment Your Vet May Not Want to Talk About – In this post from June 9th, Dr. Karen Becker discusses studies on the use of CBD oil (Phytocannabinoids) for the treatment of osteoarthritis, epilepsy, and pain management. – https://healthypets.mercola.com/sites/healthypets/archive/2018/06/09/cbd-for-dogs-osteoarthritis-epilepsy-treatment.aspx

12 Scientific Report – Consumers Perceptions of Hemp Products for Animals. AHVMA Journal, Volume 42, Spring 2016 – https://www.ahvma.org/wp-content/uploads/AHVMA-2016-V42-Hemp-Article.pdf

13 Pet Poison Helpline – Marijuanahttp://www.petpoisonhelpline.com/poison/marijuana/

14 Veterinarians see more cases of pets ingesting marijuana – News Center Maine – https://www.newscentermaine.com/article/news/local/veterinarians-see-more-cases-of-pets-ingesting-marijuana/97-559585825

15 World Health Organization Report on Cannabidiol (CBD)http://www.who.int/medicines/access/controlled-substances/5.2_CBD.pdf

 

 

Recommended Resources

Articles on Don’s Blog ( http://www.words-woofs-meows.com )

 

Podcasts from The Woof Meow Show ( http://www.woofmeowshow.com )

Other Trusted Resources

JAVAM News – Veterinary marijuana?, With pet owners already using the drug as medicine, veterinarians need to join the debate, May 13, 2013 – https://www.avma.org/news/javmanews/pages/130615a.aspx

VIDEO: Dr. Gary Richter, of Holistic Veterinary Care in #Oakland, discusses medical benefits of cannabis CBD treats for dogshttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LoyEg4uiq_A

Pot for Pets: Medical Uses of Marijuana in Companion Animals – Dr. Karen Becker interviews Dr. Rob Silverhttps://healthypets.mercola.com/sites/healthypets/archive/2015/02/08/medical-marijuana-uses.aspx

 

 

Books

Medical Marijuana and Your Pet: The Definitive Guide by Dr. Rob Silver, Lulu Publishing Service, 2015, – http://www.wellpetdispensary.com/for-dogs/treats-n-books-n-stuff/medical-marijuana-and-your-pet-the-definitive-guide-download-free-excerpts/

 

Web Sites

 

YouTube

 

________________________________________________________________________
Don Hanson is the co-owner of the Green Acres Kennel Shop ( greenacreskennel.com ) in Bangor. He is a Bach Foundation Registered Animal Practitioner (BFRAP), Certified Dog Behavior Consultant (CDBC), Associate Certified Cat Behavior Consultant (ACCBC) and a Certified Professional Dog Trainer (CPDT-KA). He produces and co- hosts a weekly radio show and podcast, The Woof Meow Show heard on The Pulse AM620 WZON and streamed at http://www.wzonradio.com/ every Saturday at 9 AM. A list of upcoming shows and podcasts of past shows can be found at www.woofmeowshow.com. Don also writes about pets at his blog: www.words-woofs-meows.com. He is committed to pet care and pet training that is free of pain, force, and fear. The opinions in this post are those of Don Hanson.

©15-Jun-18, Donald J. Hanson, All Rights Reserved
< Click for Copyright and Use Policy >

Shared Podcast – NPR and How Clicker Training Improves Learning for Both Animals and People

When Everything Clicks: The Power Of Judgment-Free Learning – broadcast on NPR on June 4th, this podcast discusses how clicker training helps people and animals learn. It includes an interview with Karen Pryor and how she became involved with operant conditioning and clicker training. –

To Listenhttps://www.npr.org/2018/06/04/616127481/when-everything-clicks-the-power-of-judgment-free-learning

To Readhttps://www.npr.org/templates/transcript/transcript.php?storyId=616127481

Clicker Training For Dogs Is Adapted To Help Surgeons Learn Quicklybroadcast on NPR on June 12th, this podcast discusses how clicker training is being used to help surgeons improve their skills.

To Listenhttps://www.npr.org/2018/06/12/619109741/clicker-training-for-dogs-is-adapted-to-help-surgeons-learn-quickly

 

Shared Article – The Neutering Controversy Understanding Data on Hormones, Behavior, and Neoplasia

The decision of whether or not to spay or neuter a dog, and when to spay and neuter, was much simpler a few years ago. New research discussed in this article from Today’s Veterinary Practice outlines why this decision is no longer straightforward. The authors conclude “Unfortunately, there is no clear answer when deciding whether one should spay or neuter an individual dog.”

You may read the entire article at – https://todaysveterinarypractice.com/neutering-controversyunderstanding-data-hormones-behavior-neoplasia/