Podcast – A Holistic Approach to Vaccines for Dogs – Part 2 w/Dr. Judy Herman

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In this episode of The Woof Meow Show on July 22, 2017, the second in a two-part series on vaccinations for dogs, Kate and Don talk with Dr. Judy Herman of the Animal Wellness Center in Augusta, Maine. In this show, we start by discussing what the American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA) classifies as non-core vaccines, those not required by every dog.

The first vaccine we discuss is the one for Canine Infectious Respiratory Disease Complex (CIRDC), more commonly known as canine cough, or sometimes kennel cough. Dr. Herman’s starts off by explaining that there are many infectious agents that can cause upper respiratory disease in a dog.  This is a vaccination that should be considered for a dog that is around other dogs, such as a show dog, a dog that boards or goes to daycare, a dog that visits the dog park, or any dog that is frequently around other dogs. She explains that they are various types of vaccines; intranasal, intraoral, and injectable, which should not be mixed. Dr. Herman also discusses the homeopathic nosode for kennel cough, which she has found to be very effective.

Nosodes are not a vaccine. They are a type of homeopathic remedy that is made from diseased tissue or discharge. Nosodes do not work the same as a vaccine and do not give one immunity. The nosode stimulates the body’s immune system to fight off the disease. Typically the kennel cough nosode is given before potential exposure, such as before a boarding stay. Unlike a vaccine, it does not offer long-term protection. The kennel cough nosode has been researched by Dr. Christopher Day in England. The study indicated that the dogs that received the nosode had little or no symptoms.

Green Acres Kennel Shop does accept the Kennel Cough vaccine instead of the canine cough vaccine as long as a client provides proof that the nosode was prescribed and dispensed by their dog’s veterinarian. Nosodes are not something you should purchase and administer without a veterinary guidance.

Don asked, and Dr. Herman explains, why dogs that are vaccinated for CIRDC still sometimes come down with the symptoms of canine cough. Vaccines do not always work with some animals, just like the flu vaccine used with humans does not always work.

In segment two, we discuss canine Leptospirosis, a vaccine against the Leptospirosis bacteria. This bacteria is passed in the urine of rodent’s skunks, raccoons, beavers, porcupines, and other wildlife. This bacteria survives in pools of stagnant water. It is seen more frequently in city dogs and smaller dogs. It causes acute kidney disease which can be treated. You need to assess your dog’s potential exposure to these risks before you decide if this vaccine makes sense for your dog. Dr. Herman indicates that there are adverse reactions to this vaccine and that it should not be given to puppies under 12 weeks of age. Although the Leptospirosis vaccine is supposed to be good for a year, many experts are not confident that it is effective for that long. There are several different types of Leptospirosis, but the vaccine does typically not cover all of these types. There is a nosode for Leptospirosis which would be available from homeopathic veterinarians. In Cuba, a Leptospirosis nosode has been used with humans, where Leptospirosis is a problem, with great success.

Lyme disease and the vaccines for it is the subject of segment three of our show. Lyme has been a concern in New England since the late 70’s, and with tick populations on the rise, it is becoming of greater concern. Specialists indicate that symptoms are more likely in; dogs less than two and immune-compromised dogs. Ninety percent of dogs infected with Lyme do not get sick. The best way to prevent Lyme is by preventing ticks. The vaccine is about 70% effective. There is a nosode for Lyme, but there are questions as to what protocol one would use.

Prevention through repellents, and checking your dog on a regular basis is the best bet for preventing Lyme. If your dog has already been exposed to Lyme, it is questionable whether or not the Lyme vaccine would be helpful. Also, the vaccine does not prevent Lyme Nephritis (inflammation of the kidneys).

Lastly, we discuss adverse reactions to vaccines; what to look for and what to do. An acute anaphylactic reaction usually occurs in the first fifteen minutes after a vaccine.  Symptoms include the face swelling up, breathing impairment, and shock, which will need immediate treatment by a veterinarian. Other symptoms include fever, vomiting, and diarrhea, and may not occur as much as a week later. Dr. Herman has also seen dogs have seizures post-vaccine. Adverse reactions to vaccines should be reported to your veterinarian and (AAHA website?)

Long-term adverse reactions can be immune mediated skin disease, thyroid disease, and even behavioral changes.

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To Contact Dr. Herman

Animal Wellness Center
95 Northern Avenue, Augusta, ME 04330

(207) 623-1177

officeawc@roadrunner.com

Website:  http://www.judithhermandvm.com/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mainehomeopathicvet/

Recommended Resources

Articles on Don’s Blog (http://www.words-woofs-meows.com)

Vaccinations–Interviews with Dr. Ron Schultzhttp://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2013/07/15/vaccinations-interviews-with-dr-ron-schultz/

How to Report Adverse Reactions to Vaccines, Drugs, Devices, Foods, and Flea and Tick Products – http://bit.ly/ReportAdverseReactions

Complementary Medicine – Tikken – Vaccines, Aggression & Homeopathy — http://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2014/10/06/complementary-medicine-tikken-vaccines-aggression-homeopathy/

Shared Blog Post – It’s Time to Put a Stop to the Mindless Over-Vaccination of Petshttp://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2017/07/05/shared-blog-post-its-time-to-put-a-stop-to-the-mindless-over-vaccination-of-pets/

 

Podcasts from The Woof Meow Show (http://www.woofmeowshow.com)

 

Podcast – A Holistic Approach to Vaccines for Dogs – Part 1 w/Dr. Judy Herman –

Meet the Veterinarian with Dr. Judy Herman from the Animal Wellness Center — http://traffic.libsyn.com/woofmeowshow/WoofMeowShow-2014-07-12-Meet_the_Vet_Judy_Herman.mp3

Vaccinations- Why they are important, Core Vaccines & Vaccination Schedules w/Dr. Ronald Schultz (June 22nd, 2013) http://traffic.libsyn.com/woofmeowshow/WoofMeowShow-2013-06-22-Vaccinations-1.mp3

Vaccinations, Titer Testing, Non-Core Vaccines and Canine Infectious Respiratory Disease Complex with Dr. Ron Schultz (June 29th, 2013) http://traffic.libsyn.com/woofmeowshow/WoofMeowShow-2013-06-29-Vaccinations-2.mp3

Vaccinations– Non-Core Vaccines for Cats and Adverse Reactions to Vaccines with Dr. Ron Schultz (July 6th, 2013)http://traffic.libsyn.com/woofmeowshow/WoofMeowShow-2013-07-06-Vaccinations-3.mp3

Vaccinations – The Rabies Challenge Fund with Dr. Ron Schultz (July 13th, 2013)http://traffic.libsyn.com/woofmeowshow/WoofMeowShow-2013-07-13-Vaccinations-Rabies_Challenge_Fund.mp3

Podcast – Holistic and Complementary Wellness for Pets – Our Personal Journey — http://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2016/10/08/podcast-holistic-and-complementary-wellness-for-pets-our-personal-journey/

Veterinary Homeopathy – Part 1 with Dr. Judy Herman from the Animal Wellness Center in Augusta — http://traffic.libsyn.com/woofmeowshow/WoofMeowShow-2014-07-26-Veterinary_Homeopathy_Judy_Herman_Part-1.mp3

Veterinary Homeopathy – Part 2 with Dr. Judy Herman from the Animal Wellness Center in Augusta — http://traffic.libsyn.com/woofmeowshow/WoofMeowShow-2014-08-02-Veterinary_Homeopathy_Judy_Herman_Part-2.mp3

Veterinary Homeopathy – Part 3 with Dr. Judy Herman from the Animal Wellness Center in Augusta — http://traffic.libsyn.com/woofmeowshow/WoofMeowShow-2014-08-09-Veterinary_Homeopathy_Judy_Herman_Part-3.mp3

Holistic Veterinary Medicine and Homeopathy with Dr. Judy Herman from the Animal Wellness Center – part 1http://traffic.libsyn.com/woofmeowshow/WoofMeowShow-2011-09-17-Holistic_and_Homeopathy-part-1.mp3

Holistic Veterinary Medicine and Homeopathy with Dr. Judy Herman from the Animal Wellness Center – part 2 —http://traffic.libsyn.com/woofmeowshow/WoofMeowShow-2011-09-24-Holistic_and_Homeopathy-part-2.mp3

 

©22JUL17, Donald J. Hanson, All Rights Reserved
< Click for Copyright and Use Policy >

Ticks! & New Products to Keep Them Away

Everyone is reporting it that it is going to be a terrible year for ticks. Considering the increase in incidents of Lyme disease and the other diseases spread by ticks you will want to take preventive measures for yourself and your pets. Ticks are not limited to tall grass and the woods. I know several people who have found them on their pets and on themselves just from being on a well-groomed lawn.

So what do you do to avoid the tick menace? First and foremost make sure that your dog is tested for Lyme annually. Secondly, consider tick preventatives for you, your pets and your lawn. We have several products at Green Acres that you might find helpful.

Cedarcide Original Personal + Pet + Home Spray

Cedarcide Original (formerly known as Best Yet) is a safe, all-natural, non-toxic insecticide made in the USA from 10% Cedar Oil and no DEET. This versatile cedar-based solution is fast and effective on everything from general insect control to major infestations. Cedarcide Original’s quick-drying, non-staining formula makes it great for personal, pet and home use. It is safe for people and pets of all ages and can be applied directly to the skin as a repellent. Cedarcide Original kills and repels fleas, ticks, mosquitoes, bed bugs, mites, chiggers, ants, flies, moths and more.

Tips for Using Cedarcide Original

People – Spray directly on skin, clothing, and gear to kill and repel insects & other pests. Use hands to apply to face-do–not spray directly. Avoid contact with eyes. Use before and after outdoor activities to kill and repel mosquitoes, ticks, and other biting pests. Reapply as needed.

Pets – Spray a light mist directly on fur, or spray onto hands and massage into coat until the solution reaches the skin. Use hands to apply to face-do not spray directly. Be sure to apply to apply all over, including armpits, in between toes, and on and around ears and tail. Use on pets before and after outdoor activities to kill and repel pests like fleas & ticks. Reapply as needed.

For Cats – Use sparingly, and apply with hands. Test for sensitivity with light initial application. On rare occasions, some cats have shown moderate sensitivity to Cedarcide Original.

Home – Spray as needed to kill and repel insects in all areas of the home: including flooring, counters, doorways, window frames, furniture, and pet areas. Cedarcide Original dries clear and will not stain.

Cedarcide TickShield Extra-Strength Organic Insect Spray

Made from 20% Cedar Oil, not DEET, this product kills and repels ticks, mosquitos, fleas, bed bugs and many other insects. Made in the USA from all natural, non-toxic ingredients the oils and scent of the natural Texas cedar oil deters ticks from attaching to you and the TickShield formula kills on contact by attacking the tick’s respiratory system and softening the exoskeleton. TickShield is Cedarcide’s strongest and longest-lasting formula, making it an ideal choice for hikers, campers and those who frequently spend time outdoors. TickShield dries quickly and will not stain.

If you want a natural and safe solution for tick removal and prevention, TickShield should be your first choice. TickShield is safe to use on humans, including small children.  TickShield is not recommended for any cats or dogs under 15lbs.

Tips for Using Cedarcide TickShield Extra-Strength

People – Spray directly on skin, clothing, and gear to kill and repel insects & many other pests. Use hands to apply to face-do not spray directly. Avoid contact with eyes. Use before and after outdoor activities to kill and repel mosquitoes, ticks, and other biting pests. Reapply as needed.

Pets – TickShield should only be used on medium to large size pets. Spray a light mist directly on fur, on a brush, or spray onto hands and massage into coat until the solution reaches the skin. Use hands to apply to face–do not spray directly. Be sure to apply all over, including armpits, in between toes, and on and around ears and tail. Use on pets before and after outdoor activities to kill and repel pests like fleas & ticks. Reapply as needed.

For Cats: We do NOT recommend using TickShield on cats.

Home – Spray as needed to kill and repel insects in all areas of the home: including flooring, counters, furniture, doorways, window frames and pet areas. TickShield dries clear and will not stain.

Cedarcide Cedar Suds Original Cedar Pet Shampoo

Safe for people, the environment and pets of all ages and sizes, Cedarsuds gently removes mats and tangles while leaving your pet with a shiny, clean, and great smelling coat. The Original Cedar scent formula safeguards your pets from insects and other pests, such as fleas, ticks, flies, mosquitoes, chiggers and other biting insects.

Cedarcide YardSafe

Yardsafe is an all-natural, nontoxic and ready-to-use solution for outdoor pest control. Yardsafe eliminates unwanted insects without adversely impacting the soil or the environment. Use Yardsafe on lawns, gardens, pet spaces, sports fields, barns, agricultural land, foundation barriers and countless other outdoor spaces. Yardsafe kills and repels fleas, ticks, mosquitoes, bed bugs, mites, chiggers, ants, flies, moths and many other pests.

Cedarcide PetSafe Granules

PetSafe Granules are made of 100% Cedar shavings and are safe for pets, plants, and people. Use this natural repellent to keep pests such as bugs, scorpions, and snakes out of your yard.

 

Recommended Resources

Articles on Don’s Blog (http://www.words-woofs-meows.com)

Pet Health and Wellness – External Parasites – Ticks and Fleashttp://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2014/05/03/pet-health-and-wellness-external-parasites-ticks-and-fleas/

Podcasts from The Woof Meow Show (http://www.woofmeowshow.com)

Podcast – Worms, Fleas, and Ticks, Oh My!-Parasites & Your Pets with Dr. Dave Cloutier – Veazie Veterinary Clinichttp://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2016/04/24/podcast-worms-fleas-and-ticks-oh-my-parasites-your-pets-with-dr-dave-cloutier-veazie-veterinary-clinic/

PODCAST – Ick! A Tick! –with Dr. Dave Cloutier from Veazie Veterinary Clinichttp://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2015/06/15/podcast-ick-a-tick-with-dr-dave-cloutier-from-veazie-veterinary-clinic/

PODCAST – Lyme Disease with Drs. Zev and Ben Myerowitz from Myerowitz Chiropractic & Acupuncture Clinic – Part 1 and 2http://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2015/11/01/podcast-lyme-disease-with-drs-zev-and-ben-myerowitz-from-myerowitz-chiropractic-acupuncture-clinic-part-1-and-2/

Web Sites

Cedarcidehttps://www.cedarcide.com/

 

 

Podcast – Holistic Approaches to Chronic Disease – Orthopedic Issues, Skin Issues and Lyme Disease with Dr. Michael Munzer from All Creatures Acupuncture

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Kate and Don and discuss holistic approaches to treating orthopedic issues, skin issues, and Lyme disease with Dr. Michael Munzer from All Creatures Acupuncture in Bucksport. Dr. Munzer explains how he works with your primary veterinarian to help your pet with the use of acupuncture, chiropractic, nutritional support, Chinese herbs, and supplements.

 

<Click to Listen to Podcast>

To Contact Dr. Munzer

All Creatures Acupuncture
Dr. Michael Munzer
77 Main St, Bucksport, ME 04416
(207) 956-0564

http://www.allcreaturesholistic.com/

https://www.facebook.com/allcreaturesholistic/

Recommended Resources

Articles on Don’s Blog (http://www.words-woofs-meows.com)

A Chiropractic Adjustment and Acupuncture Treatment for Muppyhttp://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2016/12/07/complementary-medicine-a-chiropractic-adjustment-and-acupuncture-treatment-for-muppy/

 

Podcasts from The Woof Meow Show (http://www.woofmeowshow.com)

Holistic Approaches to Chronic Disease – GI Issues and Cancer with Dr. Michael Munzer from All Creatures Acupuncturehttp:/www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2017/03/25/podcast-holistic-approaches-to-chronic-disease-gi-issues-and-cancer-with-dr-michael-munzer-from-all-creatures-acupuncture

Holistic and Complementary Wellness for Pets – Veterinary Acupuncture and Chiropractic for Pets with Dr. Michael Munzer – All Creatures Acupuncture – http://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2016/10/09/podcast-holistic-and-complementary-wellness-for-pets-veterinary-acupuncture-and-chiropractic-for-pets-with-dr-michael-munzer-all-creatures-acupuncture/

Acupuncture and Traditional Chinese Medicine for Pets with Dr. Michael Munzer from All Creatures Acupuncture Mobile Holistic Veterinary Therapieshttp://traffic.libsyn.com/woofmeowshow/WoofMeowShow-2015-03-28-Acupuncture_Traditional_Chinese_Medicine_Pets_Dr_Michael_Munzer.mp3

©18MAR17, Donald J. Hanson, All Rights Reserved
<Click for Copyright and Use Policy>

Podcast – Worms, Fleas, and Ticks, Oh My!-Parasites & Your Pets with Dr. Dave Cloutier – Veazie Veterinary Clinic

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23APR16-Worms-Fleas-Ticks 400x400It is that time of year when we invite Dr. Dave Cloutier on to the show to chat with us about the latest in parasite prevention for our pets. We start off discussing intestinal worms and heart worm, followed by ticks and then fleas. All of these parasites can threaten our pet’s health and our own as well. Dr. Cloutier provides guidance on how to monitor your pet’s health and how to safely and effectively prevent these parasites. We also address the importance of discussing any and all such preventatives that you use with your veterinarian as many of these products should not be used together and while a product may be safe for a dog, it may be very harmful to a cat.

< Click to listen to the podcast>

You can hear The Woof Meow Show on The Pulse AM620, WZON, and WKIT HD3 at 12 Noon on Saturday. If you’re not near a radio, listen on your computer at http://www.wzonthepulse.com or your smartphone or tablet with the free WZON 620 AM app. A podcast of the show is typically posted immediately after the show, and can be downloaded at www.woofmeowshow.com and the Apple iTunes store.

 

Recommended Resources

Articles on Don’s Blog (http://www.words-woofs-meows.com)

Pet Health and Wellness – External Parasites – Ticks and Fleas – http://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2014/05/03/pet-health-and-wellness-external-parasites-ticks-and-fleas/

Pet Health and Wellness – Internal Parasites – Wormshttp://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2014/04/24/pet-health-and-wellness-internal-parasites-worms/

Podcasts from The Woof Meow Show (http://www.woofmeowshow.com)

Worms, Fleas,  and Ticks, Oh My!-Parasites & Your Pets with Dr. Dave Cloutier – Veazie Veterinary Clinic – http://traffic.libsyn.com/woofmeowshow/WoofMeowShow2016-04-23-Worms_Fleas_Ticks_Oh_My-Parasites_and_Your_Pets_Dave_Cloutier.mp3

 Ick! A Tick! -with Dr. Dave Cloutier from Veazie Veterinary Clinic – http://traffic.libsyn.com/woofmeowshow/WoofMeowShow-2015-06-13-Ick_Ticks_w_Dr_Dave_Cloutier.mp3

External Parasites – Ticks and Fleas with Dr. Dave Cloutier from the Veazie Veterinary Clinic – http://traffic.libsyn.com/woofmeowshow/WoofMeowShow-2014-05-03-External_ParasitesFleas-Ticks-w_Dave_Cloutier.mp3

Internal Parasites – Worms with Dr. Dave Cloutier from the Veazie Veterinary Clinic – http://traffic.libsyn.com/woofmeowshow/WoofMeowShow-2014-04-26-Internal_ParasitesWorms-w_Dave_Cloutier.mp3

©2016, Donald J. Hanson, All Rights Reserved <Click for Copyright and Use Policy>

PODCAST – Lyme Disease with Drs. Zev and Ben Myerowitz from Myerowitz Chiropractic & Acupuncture Clinic – Part 1 and 2

Lyme disease can be scary for people or dogs. If you are frequently out and about with your dog, which is pretty typical for many of us in Maine, you should be worried about protecting yourself from ticks and other carriers of Lyme disease. In this two-part series on the Woof Meow Show, Kate and Don talk with Drs. Zev and Ben Myerowitz from Myerowitz Chiropractic & Acupuncture Clinic about Lyme disease and people.  In part 1 we will discuss what Lyme disease is, its many symptoms in humans, co-infections that are often part of Lyme disease and why Lyme disease may be the most serious infectious disease since the plague. In part 2 discuss how Lyme disease is diagnosed and how it is treated both traditionally and with Chinese herbs, homeopathy and glandular support.

If you spend time outdoors in any of our countries Lyme hot spots, and they grow every year, you will want to listen to these two shows.

Lyme Disease with Drs. Zev and Ben Myerowitz from Myerowitz Chiropractic & Acupuncture Clinic – part 1 <click to listen>

Lyme Disease with Drs. Zev and Ben Myerowitz from Myerowitz Chiropractic & Acupuncture Clinic – part 2 <click to listen>

Pet Health and Wellness – External Parasites – Ticks and Fleas

<Updated 28MAY17>

This post is based on an episode of The Woof Meow Show which aired on May 3rd, 2014. Don Hanson and Kate Dutra talk with Dr. Dave Cloutier from the Veazie Veterinary Clinic about ticks and fleas and how to safely and effectively protect your pet from these parasites and the diseases they carry. You can listen to the show by <clicking here>. You can listen to a more recent show on this topic by <clicking here>.

If you are concerned that your pet may have any type of parasite, please see your veterinarian rather than trying to treat your pet on your own. Your veterinarian is trained to help choose the safest and most effective treatments for your pets and consider how the treatment of one pet may affect other people in your home as well as other pets. Products used to kill fleas and ticks are pesticides and can be toxic your pets and even to you and your family. People inappropriately using a product for treating fleas on their pets is the number one reason the National Animal Control Center receives calls.

NO FLEAS-TICK-canstockphoto2080171Fleas and ticks are both external parasites that can affect our dogs, our cats and even us. In talking with many pet parents, it seems they believe fleas and ticks are only a “summer problem”. However, they are a potential problem any time it is warm enough for our pets to have “muddy paws.” Since most of our pets live indoors the vast majority of the time, fleas have the potential to be an issue 365 days per year.

Ticks live outdoors and once the ground is frozen they become dormant for the winter. As soon as the ground thaws ticks wake up, crawl up vegetation and wait for a victim to come by. They do not jump onto their victim; they wait until an animal brushes against them. The tick then begins crawling on the body, usually up towards the head, with a goal of biting and attaching to the animal so they can get a blood meal. When the ticks bite, they inject a numbing agent so the bite does not sting, they then inject an anti-coagulant so the bite bleeds as they lap up their meal. Ticks also regurgitate when eating, so whatever is in the ticks stomach often transfers to the bite and then into the victim’s bloodstream. After feeding, the tick will detach itself, fall off and look for a place to lay their eggs.Deer Ticks-canstockphoto13960474

Ticks can carry several bacteria that cause diseases in animals and humans. Among these are Borrelia burgdorferi (Lyme disease), Ehrlichia, Anaplasma, Babezia and others. While many animals and people can fight off these infections, some cannot. The first three of these are included as part of the test when your pet is checked for heartworm. The Deer Tick is the primary vector for transmitting Lyme disease, but they are very tiny and hard to find on our pets or on ourselves. Fortunately, Deer Ticks are not prevalent everywhere. If you avoid areas where they live you may not need a tick preventative for your pet. For example, Dr. Cloutier indicated he does not use a tick preventative on his dog because he typically finds one tick or less on his dog per year. He does choose to use a preventative, however, when visiting family in Connecticut because he sees more ticks in one short visit there than he does the rest of the year in Maine.  Whether or not your pet will acquire ticks depends on where they go and how they move through vegetation in any given area. Dr. Cloutier has clients with multiple dogs that often find ticks on one dog but none of the others.

There are ways you can minimize the chance of picking up ticks, therefore minimizing the chance of obtaining a tick-borne disease. At home, keep your yard mowed and fence off any areas where you let vegetation grow wild. While hiking, avoid areas with a high tick concentration and stay on the trail. Whether hiking or at home check your pets, and yourself, for ticks daily.

The tick obtains the organism that causes Lyme disease from the White-Footed Mouse. The tick then feeds on the deer, which becomes another vector for the disease. However, you must have a White-Footed Mouse to start the cycle and they typically stay within 30 minutes of large bodies of water. If you stay away from large bodies of water, you will be less at-risk for Lyme disease.

Lyme disease rarely affects cats, but it is possible. Because cats are such fastidious groomers, they often groom the tick off before it has had its blood meal and a chance to infect them.

When choosing a tick preventative, you need to balance the toxicity of the preventative along with its efficiency in killing ticks. In dogs, the preventatives often use two chemicals: one to kill the tick and the other to keep the tick crawling. Normally, ticks do not move much, which is why it is hard to deliver enough of the chemical to kill them. The second chemical is safe on dogs but is very unsafe for cats. Cat’s systems cannot clear this toxic chemical from their body. This is why it is absolutely essential to talk with your veterinarian when selecting tick preventatives for your pets.

Fleas are the other concern when it comes to external parasites. When topical products like FrontLine came out in the late 80s, everyone was excited about how effective it was at preventing fleas on pets. In Europe, it was originally labeled as being effective for three months. Currently, FrontLine only seems to be effective for about two weeks because the fleas have developed a resistance to the Flea-canstockphoto5849153chemical.

Dr. Cloutier prefers to use a flea preventive that uses a growth inhibitor instead of a toxic pesticide. These products don’t kill the flea, but prevent them from reproducing. This product is administered to our dogs as an edible tablet they eat and for our cats is injected. When a flea feeds upon their blood, the flea consumes the growth inhibitor. The growth inhibitor prevents the flea from developing their endoskeleton and their eggs won’t hatch.

Some people worry about the growth inhibitor products because they are a chemical. Also, they are not just applied to our pet externally; they ingest the product or it is injected into them. The growth inhibitor prevents the flea from making chitin, a derivative of glucose. Mammals do not make chitin or have chitin in their systems; therefore, they are not affected by this chemical.

Fleas and ticks are very different creatures so, in some ways, it makes no sense to use the same product on both. Ticks live 99% of their life outside in the wild. They get on our pet for a couple of hours, drop off, and then go live in the external environment. The bulk of their life-cycle occurs in the wilderness which gives us very little opportunity to kill them. Fleas, on the other hand, love living in our homes and on our pets. Most of their life-cycle occurs on our pets.

It’s important to remember that most of the products we use to control fleas and ticks on our pets are toxic pesticides. They not only kill the fleas and ticks, but also have the potential to make our pets ill or even kill them if they are not used properly. Some of these products are only available from a veterinarian. Some can be ordered on-line or purchased in pet stores, as well as grocery stores and convenience stores. Too many people assume that since these products can be purchased so easily, they 1) must be effective and 2) must be safe for all applications. Unfortunately, neither is true.

A small number of these products, the growth inhibitors, are considered drugs. This means they must be approved by the Food and Drug Administration. These drugs are approved for use on a healthy animal, in a specific application, on a specific species, and at a specific dose per weight. This is also assuming it is the only product you are using. None of the other products are drugs, but are pesticides. This means that they are regulated by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). When evaluating a pesticide, the EPA’s primary focus is on protecting the environment from chemicals. Typically these products are not tested as stringently as drugs, nor are they tested when used with other chemical products.

Evaluating which products will be the safest and most effective with your unique family of pets is something that your veterinarian is better equipped to do than anyone else. Your veterinarian knows your pet’s health history and, if you inform them, information about others in your home as well as environmental factors that need to be considered when selecting these products. For these reasons, we recommend that everyone talk to their veterinarian before using these products.

Many people choose to make decisions regarding flea and tick preventatives without their veterinarians input. This is why the number one call to the National Animal Poison Control Center is about reactions to flea products. The number of pets that become sick, or even die due to inappropriate use of flea and tick products in the US is alarmingly high. It is not because these products are bad, but because people use the product differently than intended. Either they don’t read the instructions, use too much of the product, use the product on an inappropriate species or use the product with another product that has a cumulative toxic effect. Many people are unaware that some of the products designed for use on dogs are very toxic to cats – at any dose.

The key things to remember are: fleas and tick are here to stay, they can be a big problem and can affect both humans as well as our pets, and the best source of information you have for helping you decide what products are best for your pet, and for you, is your veterinarian.

Recommended Resources

Articles on Don’s Blog (http://www.words-woofs-meows.com)

Ticks! & New Products to Keep Them Awayhttp://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2017/05/28/ticks-new-products-to-keep-them-away/

Pet Health and Wellness – Internal Parasites – Wormshttp://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2014/04/24/pet-health-and-wellness-internal-parasites-worms/

Podcasts from The Woof Meow Show (http://www.woofmeowshow.com)

Worms, Fleas,  and Ticks, Oh My!-Parasites & Your Pets with Dr. Dave Cloutier – Veazie Veterinary Clinic – http://traffic.libsyn.com/woofmeowshow/WoofMeowShow2016-04-23-Worms_Fleas_Ticks_Oh_My-Parasites_and_Your_Pets_Dave_Cloutier.mp3

 Ick! A Tick! -with Dr. Dave Cloutier from Veazie Veterinary Clinic – http://traffic.libsyn.com/woofmeowshow/WoofMeowShow-2015-06-13-Ick_Ticks_w_Dr_Dave_Cloutier.mp3

External Parasites – Ticks and Fleas with Dr. Dave Cloutier from the Veazie Veterinary Clinic – http://traffic.libsyn.com/woofmeowshow/WoofMeowShow-2014-05-03-External_ParasitesFleas-Ticks-w_Dave_Cloutier.mp3

Internal Parasites – Worms with Dr. Dave Cloutier from the Veazie Veterinary Clinic – http://traffic.libsyn.com/woofmeowshow/WoofMeowShow-2014-04-26-Internal_ParasitesWorms-w_Dave_Cloutier.mp3

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