Podcast – Listener Questions No. 27

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Kate and Don answer several listener submitted questions on topics such as: what to do about dogs that get anxious in the car, grooming for senior cats, how to define the relationship between our dog and ourselves, how to deal with cats that have stopped eating in a particular room, requirements for boarding a dog at Green Acres, equipment used to teach a dog to walk politely, and the appropriateness of fish in a cat’s diet.

You can hear The Woof Meow Show on The Pulse AM620, WZON, and WKIT HD3 at 9 AM on Saturday. If you are not near a radio, listen on your computer at http://www.wzonthepulse.com or your smartphone or tablet with the free WZON 620 AM app. A podcast of the show is typically posted immediately after the show and can be downloaded at www.woofmeowshow.com and the Apple iTunes store.

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Recommended Resources

Articles on Don’s Blog (http://www.words-woofs-meows.com)

Dog Training – How Do I Get My Dog to Walk Politely Instead of Pulling on the Leash?http://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2017/04/27/dog-training-how-do-i-get-my-dog-to-walk-politely-instead-of-pulling-on-the-leash/

 

©8JUL17, Donald J. Hanson, All Rights Reserved
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Podcast – Separation Anxiety with Dr. David Cloutier from Veazie Veterinary Clinic

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Don, Kate, and Dr. Cloutier wish to emphasize that this show should NOT be considered to be a Do-It-Yourself solution to treating a dog with Separation Anxiety. If you have a dog with separation anxiety that is not being treated professionally, or if you have a pet that you suspect has separation anxiety, you will want to listen to this show and then make an appointment with your veterinarian as soon as possible. Dogs experiencing separation anxiety are suffering greatly and need appropriate treatment as this is not a condition that will resolve on its own.

We start by reviewing the clinical signs of separation anxiety and consider the differences between separation anxiety, normal mischief and scrounging, and other forms of anxiety. From there we move on to factors that may predispose a dog to separation issues. Then we discuss treatment options such as medication, behavior modification, and other means of reducing your dog’s stress.

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To Contact Dr. Cloutier

Veazie Veterinary Clinic
1522 State St, Veazie, ME 04401

(207) 941-8840

Website –  http://www.veazievet.com/

Facebook Page – https://www.facebook.com/veazievet/

Recommended Resources

 Articles on Don’s Blog

Alone Traininghttp://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2014/08/01/dog-training-alone-training/

Preventing separation anxiety – Teaching your dog to cope with being alonehttp://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2016/03/14/dog-training-preventing-separation-anxiety-teaching-your-dog-to-cope-with-being-alone/

ADAPTIL™/DAP COMFORTZONE™http://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2014/08/14/canine-behavior-adaptild-a-p-comfortzone/

Understanding, Identifying and Coping with Canine Stresshttp://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2015/11/01/canine-behavior-understanding-identifying-and-coping-with-canine-stress/

Pet Behavior and Wellness – Pet Behavior as an Essential Component to Holistic Wellnesshttp://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2016/10/28/pet-behavior-and-wellness-pet-behavior-as-an-essential-component-to-holistic-wellness/

Your Pet’s Behavioral Health Is As Important As Their Physical Well-Being: The New AAHA Canine and Feline Behavior Management Guidelineshttp://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2015/08/01/pet-health-and-wellness-your-pets-behavioral-health-is-as-important-as-their-physical-well-being/

Introduction to Canine Communicationhttp://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2015/04/05/dog-training-introduction-to-canine-communication/

An Overview of the Bach Flower Remedieshttp://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2015/06/22/bach-flower-remedies-an-overview-of-the-bach-flower-remedies/

 

©1MAY17, Donald J. Hanson, All Rights Reserved <Click for Copyright and Use Policy>

No Pain, No Force, & No Fear – AVSAB Adopts Position Statement on Positive Veterinary Care

(Updated 29APR17)

The American Veterinary Society of Animal Behavior (AVSAB) has adopted a new position statement on positive veterinary care. This document emphasizes the importance of making visits to the veterinarian free of stress, anxiety, and fear. This statement outlines why fear-free veterinary visits are so important and provides guidelines for veterinary practices, as well as other pet care professionals, as to how they can make this happen. I believe that making the care and training of a pet free of pain, force, and fear is equally essential for animal shelters, boarding kennels, daycares, dog trainers, dog walkers, groomers, pet sitters, and rescue organizations, as it is for veterinarians and their staffs.

I encourage every pet parent/guardian/owner, whatever you call yourself, as well as every pet care professional to read and implement these guidelines. Please share this position statement with those that have pets and anyone that cares for your pet.

You can access the position statement at this link – https://avsab.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/Positive-Veterinary-Care-Position-Statement-download.pdf

 

Recommended Resources

Articles on Don’s Blog (http://www.words-woofs-meows.com)

Green Acres Kennel Shop Position Statement on Pet Friendly, Force-Free Pet Care – <Click Here>

Green Acres Kennel Shop Position on the Use of Dominance and Punishment for the Training and Behavior Modification of Dogs <Click Here>

Selecting A Pet Care Provider – Yes! A Trend Towards Kinder and Gentler Professional Pet Care – Green Acres Kennel Shop’s “Pet Friendly” Philosophy – Part 1 – <Click Here>

Selecting A Pet Care Provider – Yes! A Trend Towards Kinder and Gentler Professional Pet Care – The PPG – Part 2 – <Click Here>

Selecting A Pet Care Provider – Yes! A Trend Towards Kinder and Gentler Professional Pet Care – A Veterinary Perspective – Part 3- <Click Here>

Shared Blog Post – Are You Failing Your Patients in This Major Way? – <Click Here>

Pet Behavior and Wellness – Pet Behavior as an Essential Component to Holistic Wellness – <Click Here>

Podcast – ENCORE: Pet Behavior, Vets & The AAHA Canine and Feline Behavior Management Guidelines – Dr. Dave Cloutier – Veazie Veterinary Clinic – <Click Here>

Canine Behavior – Myths and Facts – Part 1, Where do we get our knowledge about dogs? <Click Here>

Dog Training – How science and reward-based training have pulled dog training out of the dark ages – <Click Here>

Pet Care Services – Please Be Cautious When Choosing Who Cares For Your Pets – <Click Here>

Canine Behavior – Understanding, Identifying and Coping with Canine Stress – <Click Here>

Animal Welfare – Understanding Behavior; Why It Matters – <Click Here>

Pet Health and Wellness – Your Pet’s Behavioral Health Is As Important As Their Physical Well-Being – <Click Here>

Dogs – The Unintended Consequences of Shock Collar – <Click Here>

Web Sites

AVSAB Position Statement on the Use of Dominance Theory in Behavior Modification of animals.  <Click Here>

AVSAB Position Statement – Punishment Guidelines: The use of punishment for dealing with animal behavior problems. <Click Here>

 

©30DEC16, Donald J. Hanson, All Rights Reserved <Click for Copyright and Use Policy>

Halloween Tips for Pets and Their People

halloween-tips-for-pets-and-people-canstockphoto12289416-800x800Halloween is that time of year when many children and even some adults like to dress up in costumes that make them look different and often scary. They may even take on the stilted walk or the pseudo-terrifying vocalizations of the character they are portraying.

Now think about Halloween and all of the shenanigans it entails from your pets perspective.  Was your dog ever socialized/habituated to anything remotely like Halloween? Is it likely that they will find groups of people behaving weirdly and trying to scare one another a pleasant experience? You already know that the answer to both questions, for most pets, is a resounding “No!” Do your pets a favor this Halloween and keep them inside and safe.

You and your children also want to be cautious when out trick-or-treating as you may encounter dogs that will find you frightening which may cause them to bark and growl at you.

Tips for You and Your Pets

  • Black cats, due to the mythology about them and Halloween, should be kept inside and safe, well in advance of and after the Halloween holiday. Sadly, black cats can become victims of violence or may be abducted to be someone’s costume accessory.
  • Dressing your pet in a costume may be fun for you but may be a very stressful experience for your pet. If you dog freezes in place, or frantically tries to get out of the costume, or exhibits any calming signals (tongue flicks, yawns, ), your dog would probably prefer to remain “au naturel” (without costume).
  • Secure your pet in a part of your home where they will be behind a closed door and away from the commotion of a party or the trick-or-treaters coming to your door. Pets could easily bolt through an open door if they are frightened and are often injured if left outdoors by Halloween pranksters. The frenetic activity of a party, especially where people are dressed oddly and acting unusually is often frightening to our pets.
  • If you are having people over for Halloween, make sure everyone at the party knows that they are to respect your pets and just “let them be.” If your dog enjoys their crate, you may even want to crate them with a stuffed Kong or another favorite chew toy, far from the maddening crowd. It may even be helpful to play some soothing music or leave the radio on in the room with your pets to help mask the sounds of your party and activity at the front door.
  • If your dog is reactive to your door bell either disconnect it or be waiting at the door, so the trick-or-treaters do not need to ring the bell or knock on your door.
  • Candy is prevalent at Halloween, and anything containing chocolate or the artificial sweeter Xylitol can be very toxic to your pets, Make sure to keep all candy out of reach of your pets.
  • If you are taking your children trick-or-treating, I’d strongly encourage you to leave your dog at home as described above. They will be far happier.

Tips for Parents and Kids

  • When trick-or-treating, avoid houses if you can hear a dog barking behind the door, if you can see a dog at the door or windows or if you see a dog tied in the yard or barking from behind a fence.
  • Never approach any dog, even if you know him. He may not recognize you in your costume.
  • If a homeowner opens their door and you see a dog there, just stay still and wait for the dog owner to put their dog away. You can tell them that you do not want to interact with their dog. Do not move towards the person or the dog, wait for them to come to you and give you their treat and then wait for them to close the door before you turn away and leave.
  • If a dog runs at you while out trick-or-treating, just stand still and “Be A Tree” (hold your hands folded in front of you with your eyes looking at your feet). The dog will probably just sniff you and move on. Wait for the dog’s owner or another adult to come and get the dog before you turn away. If no adult is around, wait for the dog to go away.
  • It is best to ignore other people’s dogs on Halloween if you encounter them while out walking. The dog may be anxious about all the people and the costumes they are wearing. Even if you know the dog, he may not recognize you in your costume.

 

©20OCT16, Donald J. Hanson, All Rights Reserved <Click for Copyright and Use Policy>

Product – The Thundershirt™

The Thundershirt™ is a patent-pending pressure wrap that applies a gentle, constant pressure on a dog’s torso. It is used to help alleviate anxiety due to; fear of thunder or fireworks, separation or travel, crate training, problem barking (when barking is a result of anxiety or stress), hyperactivity, and other causes of anxiety. It is available from a myriad of sources, and we have been selling it at Green Acres for a few years now.

When I first heard about the Thundershirt I was skeptical, but anxiety in a pet is a heart-wrenching issue and is often difficult to treat, so I knew it was worth a try. Plus there is a money-back guarantee. If you are not happy with the Thundershirt, just return it to the manufacturer within 45 days along with your receipt.

I cannot give you a detailed scientific explanation of why the Thundershirt works. It provides a gentle, constant pressure around your dog’s torso, and pressure of this type does seem to have a calming effect on the nervous system. For example, veterinarians often use pressure to relax cattle during the administration of vaccines; pressure shirts are often used with children with behavioral issues to relieve stress and gain focus, and for ages, mothers have held infants to provide comfort. When used as directed the Thundershirt cannot harm your dog and if it helps resolve their anxiety, why not try it?

In some cases the Thundershirt may be used by itself and in other cases the dog may benefit from also using a behavior modification program, Dog Appeasing Pheromone (DAP), Bach Flower Remedies, and veterinarian prescribed anti-anxiety medications.

At this time we have three Green Acres staff members using the Thundershirt with their dogs; one for thunderstorm issues, one for combined thunderstorm and travel issues, and one for general anxiety. All have noticed a marked improvement since using the Thundershirt.

These are some testimonials from the Thundershirt website:

“We’ve been using Thundershirt at my clinic, and the feedback from our clients is very positive. Thundershirt is a good alternative solution to try versus medications. And it will definitely ‘Do no harm’.”

Dr. Donald Heagren, DVM
Cornwallis Road Animal Hospital
Durham, NC

“Pressure wraps are an effective, non-invasive way to help dogs to feel more at ease. I like the Thundershirt especially because of its soft material, easy-to-apply Velcro closures, and low cost. I recommend this product to my training clients for thunderstorm phobias, nail trims, and a variety of other fears such as sounds, riding in the car, and generalized fear of walking outdoors. I wish the Thundershirt had been around when my thunder-phobic German Shepherd was alive. I’m glad dogs everywhere can now reap its benefits.“

Nicole Wilde, CPDT-KA

“Ratchet is one of the dogs rescued from Iraq by Operation Baghdad Pups. Through a partnership between Operation Baghdad Pups and Thundershirt, I was sent one in the mail. I’d have to say that I was skeptical about the claims… for about 15 seconds. Ratchet had problems with barking, anxiety, and fear of unfamiliar noises. He was particularly anxious around other dogs, having been a guard dog in Iraq. Suddenly, while wearing the Thundershirt, Ratchet seemed to gain new confidence. Other dogs didn’t worry him. Thunderstorms were just things that made the grass wet. Airplanes, repairmen, and even the cat that went for walks outside our apartment were no longer worries for him. He could sit on the balcony and enjoy the day without anxiety, and that made both of us believers! Thank you, Thundershirt!”

Georgia

 

 

©2016, Donald J. Hanson, All Rights Reserved <Click for Copyright and Use Policy>