URGENT! – Health Alert – Canine Cough in Southern Maine

September 10th, 2017 – We have received information that there have been several cases of Canine Cough in Southern Maine (this is not to be confused with the Canine Flu). We have currently NOT experienced any here at Green Acres at this time, but there is always the potential that this may occur.

We have contacted local veterinarians and asked them to keep us advised if they start to see canine cough in the greater Bangor area.

As you may all know, Canine Cough can come from a variety of different strains, and while we do require the vaccination, it is not full-proof, particularly against strains that may not be covered by the vaccine. That being said, vaccinated dogs typically recover more quickly. While for most dogs, Canine Cough is a relatively mild cold with an hacking cough, there is always a concern for the development of pneumonia, particularly in the young and the old.

If you are seeing any signs of a “cold” in your dog (runny eyes or nose, sneezing, coughing, lethargy, lack of appetite, fever, etc.) please do not bring your pet for daycare, boarding, grooming or training until they have seen their veterinarian and have been cleared. Also, please contact us immediately so that we are aware. As we experienced earlier this year, often dogs are contagious well before they are symptomatic so the sooner we have a heads up the better for all.

At Green Acres Kennel Shop we do require that dogs that board or daycare with us, or that are enrolled in a training class, be current on a canine cough vaccine as administered by their veterinarian, or canine cough nosodes as prescribed and provided by the veterinarian. Not all boarding and daycare facilities require canine cough preventatives.

Canine cough or kennel cough are lay terms for Canine Infectious Respiratory Disease Complex (CIRDC), which is highly contagious to other dogs, much like the common cold is with people. Canine cough can be transmitted through the air from one dog to the next or by contact with contaminated objects such as a common water dish at the dog park or in front of a dog-friendly store. Like the common cold is to humans, canine cough is not typically serious, but if you see symptoms in your dog (coughing, gagging, vomiting, or general lethargy) I would recommend that you call your veterinarian.

For More Information on canine cough <click here>

©2017, Donald J. Hanson, All Rights Reserved <Click for Copyright and Use Policy>

How to Report Adverse Reactions to Vaccines, Drugs, Devices, Foods, and Flea and Tick Products

If your pet has an adverse reaction to a vaccine, a drug, a device, food or treat, or a flea or tick control product, you need to report that adverse reaction to your veterinarian and the appropriate government agency. By doing so, you may prevent another pet from a serious illness or death.

The following links will help you to do so. Thank you!

USDA – Vaccines – Adverse Event Reportinghttps://www.aphis.usda.gov/aphis/ourfocus/animalhealth/veterinary-biologics/adverse-event-reporting/ct_vb_adverse_event

FDA – How to Report Animal Drug Side Effects and Product Problemshttps://www.fda.gov/animalveterinary/safetyhealth/reportaproblem/ucm055305.htm

EPA – Flea and Tick Control Products – Pesticide Poisoning in Petshttp://npic.orst.edu/health/petpoison.html

FDA – Pet Food – How to Report Product Problems and Complaints to the FDAhttps://www.fda.gov/ForConsumers/ConsumerUpdates/ucm095859.htm

 

©6JUL17, Donald J. Hanson, All Rights Reserved
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HEALTH ALERT – Important new from the Rabies Challenge Fund!

Important new from the Rabies Challenge Fund. Let’s hope that governments throughout the world do the right thing and accept Rabies titer results instead of requiring additional, yet unnecessary and often detrimental revaccination.

Recently updated testimony/statement of Dr. Ronald Schultz on rabies vaccination and rabies titers. “Canine studies funded by The Rabies Challenge Fund and performed in collaboration with the University of Georgia have confirmed that dogs that have a detectable rabies antibody titer are resistant to disease caused by experimental challenge with virulent rabies virus for as long as 7 years after two doses of rabies vaccine.”

FMIhttps://media.wix.com/ugd/03057b_baf85dd47501428aa6f238d71a177d91.pdf

URGENT! – Health Alert – Canine Cough in the Community

March 29th, 2017 – There is a strain of canine cough in the community. We have talked to veterinarians in the area, and they have reported seeing dogs with canine cough in dogs that have been at several kennels and daycares in the area. They have also seen dogs with canine cough that have not been at any kennel or daycare, at least recently, and as reported, these dogs have not necessarily been around other dogs. In some cases, canine cough has been seen in dogs that were current on their Bordetella vaccine, which suggests that the vaccination does not offer immunity to this particular strain of canine cough.

While the number of dogs that have shown symptoms and/or have been diagnosed is small compared to those that are symptom and disease free, we want to be sure that you are aware of the situation.

At Green Acres Kennel Shop we do require that dogs that board or daycare with us, or that are enrolled in a training class, be current on a canine cough vaccine as administered by their veterinarian, or canine cough nosodes as prescribed and provided by the veterinarian. Not all boarding and daycare facilities require canine cough preventatives.

Canine cough or kennel cough are lay terms for Canine Infectious Respiratory Disease Complex (CIRDC), which is highly contagious to other dogs, much like the common cold is with people. Canine cough can be transmitted through the air from one dog to the next or by contact with contaminated objects such as a common water dish at the dog park or in front of a dog-friendly store. Like the common cold is to humans, canine cough is not typically serious, but if you see symptoms in your dog (coughing, gagging, vomiting, or general lethargy) I would recommend that you call your veterinarian.

For More Information on canine cough <click here>

©2017, Donald J. Hanson, All Rights Reserved <Click for Copyright and Use Policy>

Shared Blog Post – Veterinary toxicology alert: Oils used in ‘scent training’ can harm dogs

People that know me have learned that I am a fan of using natural remedies whenever possible; however, I also always tell people that “natural” does not mean something is safe.

One of the natural remedies I have used with myself are essential oils. I have recently started studying their use with animals and in that process have learned that Birch is one of the oils that is not safe for use with pets. That caused me to take notice as I have friends who do canine nosework and it is my understanding that Birch is one of the first scents that they are trained to find. Today I asked some of those friends if they knew why Birch was selected and if they had heard anything about potential issues with Birch, and they had not.

I decided to do some research on Google and found an article on DVM360 from May of 2014 entitled “Veterinary toxicology alert: Oils used in ‘scent training’ can harm dogs.” The lead paragraph of this article states “Michigan State researchers confirm toxicity of birch oil, warn that nontoxic scents may lead pets to food sources with xylitol.”

If you use the essential oil Birch for yourself or other family members and have pets, or if you do canine nosework and use Birch, I would encourage you to read this article. http://veterinarynews.dvm360.com/veterinary-toxicology-alert-oils-used-scent-training-can-harm-dogs

The web site http://www.natural-dog-health-remedies.com/ lists the following essential oils as unsafe for use with dogs; Anise, Birch, Camphor, Cassia, Clove leaf and bud, Hissop, Horseradish,  Juniper Wood, Mustard, Pennyroyal, Rue, Tansy, White Thyme, Wintergreen, Yarrow, and Wormwood.

Essential oils have many wonderful health properties, but please make sure you talk to your pet’s veterinarian before using them.

URGENT! – Health Alert – Canine Cough in the Community

Pet Health AlertThere is a strain of canine cough in the community. We’ve talked to veterinarians in the area and they have seen canine cough with several dogs that have been at several kennels in the area. It has also been observed in dogs that have not been at any kennel, at least recently, and as reported, these dogs have not been around other dogs. Canine cough has been seen in several dogs that were current on their Bordetella vaccine which suggests that the vaccination does not offer immunity to this particular strain. While the number of dogs that have shown symptoms and/or have been diagnosed is small compared to those that are symptom and disease free, we want to be sure that you are aware of the situation.

Canine cough or kennel cough is actually a lay term for Canine Infectious Respiratory Disease Complex (CIRDC). It is highly contagious to other dogs, much like the common cold is with people. It can be transmitted through the air from one dog to the next or by contact with contaminated objects such as a common water dish at the dog park or in front of a dog-friendly store. It is not normally serious, but if you see symptoms in your dog (coughing, gagging, vomiting, or general lethargy) I would recommend that you call your veterinarian.

For More Information on canine cough <click here>

©2015, Donald J. Hanson, All Rights Reserved <Click for Copyright and Use Policy>

URGENT! – HEALTH ALERT – Don’t Feed Nut Butters to Dogs Without First Checking for Xylitol!

URGENT! – HEALTH ALERT – Don’t Feed Nut Butters to Dogs Without First Checking for Xylitol!
Beware of Xylitol 800x800Not until you read the label, and even then – consider all the facts:
Many people think that xylitol is an artificial sweetener, but it’s not, and that’s actually a problem in so far as understanding a label. Due to it being a natural part of fruits and veggies, it might be listed as “natural sweetener“, or “sweetened naturally
Some nut butters (not just peanut butter) have changed to include xylitol, a natural alcohol sweetener. Xylitol is poisonous to dogs, causing liver failure and dangerously low blood sugar.
Note: Not all natural alcohol sweeteners are a health risk for dogs, but if all the label states is “sugar alcohol” without stating which one, you’ll want to keep it away from dogs.

Thank you to Monica Segal of monicasegal.com for sharing