Podcast – Listener Questions No. 28

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In this episode of The Woof Meow Show from January 20th, 2018, Kate and Don answer questions from their audience. In their 28th Listener Question show they address;

  • How do I help my new cat get to overcome her fear and acclimate to her new home?
  • How do I deal with a dog that hangs around in the kitchen when I am preparing food?
  • My dog barks incessantly, how do I get him to stop barking?
  • When getting a kitten is it better to get two?
  • Should we get two puppies at the same time?
  • How does Green Acres Kennel Shop determine what pets foods they sell?

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Recommended Resources

Articles on Don’s Blog ( http://www.words-woofs-meows.com )

Cats, Boxes & Other Small Spaceshttp://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2015/06/13/cats-boxes-other-small-spaces/

Cat Behavior – Make Your Life Easier – Get Your Cat to Love Their Carrierhttp://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2015/03/25/cat-behavior-make-your-life-easier-get-your-cat-to-love-their-carrier/

Dog Training – How Do I Get My Dog to Stop Barking? Barkinghttp://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2015/04/11/dog-training-how-do-i-get-my-dog-to-stop-barking-barking/

Pet Nutrition – What Should I Feed My Pet?http://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2017/06/04/pet-nutrition-what-should-i-feed-my-pet/

Pet Nutrition – What Do You Feed Your Dog?http://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2016/05/31/pet-nutrition-what-do-you-feed-your-dog/

Nutrition – Which Brand of Pet Food is the Best? – Part 1http://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2014/06/01/nutrition-which-brand-of-pet-food-is-the-best-part-1/

Nutrition – Which Brand of Pet Food is the Best? – Part 2http://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2014/07/01/nutrition-which-brand-of-pet-food-is-the-best-part-2/

Nutrition – Which Brand of Pet Food is the Best? – Part 3http://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2014/08/01/nutrition-which-brand-of-pet-food-is-the-best-part-3/

 

Podcasts from The Woof Meow Show ( http://www.woofmeowshow.com )

 

Podcast – Listener Questions No. 26 All About Cats with Dr. Mike McCaw from Veazie Veterinary Clinic – http://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2016/10/22/podcast-listener-questions-no-26-all-about-cats-with-dr-mike-mccaw-from-veazie-veterinary-clinic/

©20JAN18, Donald J. Hanson, All Rights Reserved
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Shared Article – Why do dogs eat poop? New research suggests an ancient answer

This article from Karin Brulliard in The Washington Post discusses some new theories on why dogs eat feces.

This is a question we are asked several times a year. Highlights from the article are:

This new paper from UC-Davis indicates that “…16 percent of pups consume other canines’ feces “frequently,” having been spotted doing it more than six times by their owners. The vast majority prefer their poop to be fresh, or no more than one to two days since deposit.”

The paper does not indicate why dogs eat feces. In fact, no evidence was found that connects poop-eating with age, diet, or compulsive behaviors such as tail-chasing.

The researcher behind the paper has theorized that dogs eat fresh poop to destroy parasite eggs found in the poop. When they consume the poop the acid in their stomach destroys the eggs.

Ma recommendation if you have a poop-eater is to pick up the poop and dispose of it immediately. It works. Always.

FMI https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/animalia/wp/2018/01/19/why-do-dogs-eat-poop-new-research-suggests-an-ancient-answer

How Can I Tell When My Dog Is Anxious or Fearful?

As a Certified Dog Behavior Consultant (CDBC) I work with clients with dogs with a wide variety of anxiety related issues. In some cases, the dog has a minor fear towards a particular type of person, and other times the dog might be terrified. Most people recognize the latter, but many see a dog that is not reacting as being “fine” or “okay” when in fact, these dogs can be very afraid. A dog that is not reacting may be frozen in fear. It is important to understand how your dog expresses their emotions so that you can help them when they are frightened.

Dogs are visual communicators and in most cases do an excellent job of trying to tell one another and us when they are uncomfortable. This starts with subtle body language and can rapidly escalate to vocalizations and actions such as lunging, snapping, and biting. Below you will find several resources that will help you to understand better what your dog is trying to tell you.

Recommended Resources

Articles on Don’s Blog ( http://www.words-woofs-meows.com )

Introduction to Canine Communicationhttp://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2016/01/16/dog-behavior-introduction-to-canine-communication/

Body Language of Fear in Dogs – Dr. Sophia Yinhttp://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2016/04/04/body-language-of-fear-in-dogs-dr-sophia-yin/

Canine Body Language – How To Greet A Dog and What to Avoid – Dr. Sophia Yinhttp://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2016/04/04/canine-body-language-how-to-greet-a-dog-and-what-to-avoid-dr-sophia-yin/

Signs of Anxiety and Fear from Dr. Marty Beckerhttp://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2018/01/17/signs-of-anxiety-and-fear-from-dr-marty-becker/

Understanding, Identifying and Coping with Canine Stresshttp://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2015/11/01/canine-behavior-understanding-identifying-and-coping-with-canine-stress/

What Should I Do When My Dog Growlshttp://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2015/07/18/canine-behavior-what-should-i-do-when-my-dog-growls/

Help! My Dog is Aggressive, Reactive, Fearful, Anxious, etc. – What do I do?http://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2017/04/03/help-my-dog-is-aggressive-reactive-fearful-anxious-etc-what-do-i-do/

 

Books

A Kids’ Comprehensive Guide to Speaking Dog! by Niki Tudge – < Read a Review >

On Talking Terms With Dogs: Calming Signals by Turid Rugaas – < Read a Review >

The Other End of the Leash – Why We Do What We Do Around Dogs by Patricia B. McConnell, Ph.D., < Book Review >

Web Sites

iSpeakDog – http://www.ispeakdog.org/

Turid Rugaas – Calming Signalshttp://en.turid-rugaas.no/calming-signals—the-art-of-survival.html

YouTube

Turid Rugaas Calming Signals DVDhttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lj7BWxC6iVs

©17-Jan-18, Donald J. Hanson, All Rights Reserved
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Book Review – A Kids’ Comprehensive Guide to Speaking Dog! by Niki Tudge

If your family includes children and a dog, if you have children that spend time with friends and family members that have a dog, or if you have a dog that spends any time around children, you, your children, and your dog will benefit from your reading A Kids’ Comprehensive Guide to Speaking Dog! by Niki Tudge.

The goal of this new book from author Niki Tudge and Doggone Safe is to provide a resource that anyone can use to teach children how to be safe around dogs by teaching them how to “speak dog.” As a dog training instructor that teaches both adults and children how to train their dogs, we make teaching canine body language part of our classes. What I have learned over the past 22 years is that before taking a dog training class, even most adults are not aware of most aspects of “speaking dog,” which is why I believe this book will be of value to both children and adults.

A Kids’ Comprehensive Guide to Speaking Dog! is written to be used as an interactive resource and uses cartoons and photographs to illustrate body language dogs use to signal when they are happy, afraid, and angry. By teaching children, and adults, how to read and respond to these signs the book helps keep people and dogs safe. The world is full of children and dogs, and it is essential that we teach them how to interact safely. A Kids’ Comprehensive Guide to Speaking Dog! combined with a parent or teacher does just that.  I give this book five paws!

You can purchase A Kids’ Comprehensive Guide to Speaking Dog! at Green Acres Kennel Shop.

Recommended Resources

Articles on Don’s Blog ( http://www.words-woofs-meows.com )

Especially for New Dog Parentshttp://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2017/08/20/especially-for-new-dog-parents/

Especially for New Puppy Parentshttp://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2016/04/10/especially-for-new-puppy-parents/

Dog Behavior – Introduction to Canine Communicationhttp://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2016/01/16/dog-behavior-introduction-to-canine-communication/

Book Review – Living with Kids and Dogs…Without Losing Your Mind: A Parent’s Guide to Controlling the Chaos by Colleen Pelarhttp://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2018/01/10/book-review-living-with-kids-and-dogswithout-losing-your-mind-a-parents-guide-to-controlling-the-chaos-by-colleen-pelar/

Book Review – On Talking Terms with Dogs: Calming Signals by Turid Rugaashttp://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2018/01/10/book-review-on-talking-terms-with-dogs-calming-signals-by-turid-rugaas/

Body Language of Fear and Aggression – Dr. Sophia Yinhttp://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2016/04/04/body-language-of-fear-in-dogs-dr-sophia-yin/

Canine Body Language – How To Greet A Dog and What to Avoid – Dr. Sophia Yinhttp://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2016/04/04/canine-body-language-how-to-greet-a-dog-and-what-to-avoid-dr-sophia-yin/

Podcasts from The Woof Meow Show ( http://www.woofmeowshow.com )

Dog Bite Prevention & Doggone Safe with Teresa Lewin of Doggone Safe- part 1http://traffic.libsyn.com/woofmeowshow/WoofMeowShow-2013-04-06-Dog_Bite-1.mp3

Dog Bite Prevention & Doggone Safe with Teresa Lewin of Doggone Safe- part 2http://traffic.libsyn.com/woofmeowshow/WoofMeowShow-2013-04-13-Dog_Bite_-2.mp3

Thoughts on a Kids & Dogs Seminarhttp://traffic.libsyn.com/woofmeowshow/WoofMeowShow-2013-11-09-Kids_and_Pets-Thoughts_on_A_seminar_.mp3

Web Sites

Doggone Safehttps://doggonesafe.com/

The Pet Professional Guildhttps://www.petprofessionalguild.com/

Green Acres Kennel Shophttp://www.greenacreskennel.com/

©10-Jan-18, Donald J. Hanson, All Rights Reserved
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Book Review – On Talking Terms with Dogs: Calming Signals by Turid Rugaas

SUGGESTED AUDIENCE: Anyone who interacts or wants to interact with dogs, on any level.

This book, while few in pages, and its author Turid Rugaas, have influenced my understanding of dogs more than any other book or seminar I have read or attended. This gentle, kind, woman is incredibly knowledgeable about canine behavior and ethology. She has taught me and many others how to live in harmony with our dogs by helping us to better understand what they are trying to tell us, and in turn she has taught us a better way to express ourselves to our dogs.

Full of photographs illustrating each point, On Talking Terms With Dogs: Calming Signals focuses on how dogs use specific body language to cutoff aggression and other perceived threats. Dogs use these calming signals to tell one another, and us, when they are feeling anxious and stressed. This book will help you learn ‘dog language’, for which you will be rewarded with a much better understanding of your pet and his behavior.

FAVORITE QUOTE: “If you want your dog to respect you, you must also respect your dog. A good relationship is based on two-way communication, and living together in a well-balanced togetherness. Leadership does not solve anything; it only creates problems, in our lives as well as in the dogs’ lives.”

On Talking Terms with Dogs: Calming Signals should be required reading for everyone who has or aspires to work with or share their life with a dog.

©4APR14, Donald J. Hanson, All Rights Reserved
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Book Review – Living with Kids and Dogs…Without Losing Your Mind: A Parent’s Guide to Controlling the Chaos by Colleen Pelar

Colleen Pelar, CPDT and author of Living with Kids and Dogs…Without Losing Your Mind: A Parent’s Guide to Controlling the Chaos, deserves a huge paws up for her wonderful book. This trainer/author recognized a need for a realistic, down to earth discussion about how to successfully manage the mayhem. Colleen is a Certified Professional Dog Trainer whose focus is on family based classes and she has personally survived the chaos that ensues when trying to raise kids and dogs together.

For many, it is a deeply ingrained belief that kids and dogs belong together and that no childhood is complete without a dog. Reality however is often very different. The simple fact of the matter is that sometimes children and dogs do not mix well. There is much data out there discussing dog bites and children, however very few books give us good, positive solutions. Yes, we all know that you should never leave a child and a dog together unattended, ever. If only it were that simple! Colleen looks at reality and accepts that kids will be kids and dogs will be dogs, and works with that premise. She does a great job in her discussion of solutions to the many problems faced by parents when trying to handle chaotic situations, and helps to lay the foundation so that your child and dog can build a positive relationship.

The chapters are broken down nicely and cover whether or not you should get a dog (if you do not already have one), the fundamentals of assessing the dog you have (if you do already have one), and looking at growth stages of children and the various approaches that you will need at these different ages. Time is spent on teaching your child how to interact appropriately with all dogs and becoming your dog’s advocate. Colleen discusses “deal breakers” such as resource guarding and how to prevent bites. She explains the equipment you will need to train and manage your dog, and introduces ideas such as boundary ropes. Also discussed is the difference between your children and their friends and how you should handle situations when your kids have little visitors. Colleen tries to hammer home the idea that this pet, while you may have your children in mind, is ultimately going to be the parent’s and thus the parent’s responsibility.

The final chapter of Living with Kids and Dogs…Without Losing Your Mind: A Parent’s Guide to Controlling the Chaos covers the topic of how to help your children say goodbye to your dog, whether it is because your dog has lived a full life and passed on or if it is because you have made the decision that your dog would be better off in a home that does not have as much activity. I must admit that this chapter put me in tears.

While Colleen does not go into the fundamentals of training with her book, she does give an overview of how to train each behavior she introduces so that the average reader would have the ability to implement these behaviors on their own. She also includes games the kids can do to help them learn how to behave around dogs and exercises for them to assist with training. The author indicates times at which families should seek professional help with their pets. At the end, there is a nice listing of resources for those that want further information or assistance.

The important points of each chapter have been graciously summarized at the end so that you can glance at those first to determine your need for that chapter. This is not a cumbersome book and is one that you can easily read when the little one is down for a nap.

I highly recommend Living with Kids and Dogs…Without Losing Your Mind. It is by far one of the best books I have read in a long time, fills a long standing void and is a must have for anyone who has children and dogs living under the same roof.

—Katrina Dutra

©15SEP06, Green Acres Kennel Shop, All Rights Reserved
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Shared Blog Post – Pet Obesity Rises for 7th Straight Year, and It’s Costly

An article in the January 3rd issue of Pets+ ( http://petsplusmag.com ) reports that cases of pet obesity have risen for the seventh straight year according to data from Nationwide, a pet insurance provider. Twenty percent of the 1.4 million pet insurance claims filed with Nationwide in 2016 were for conditions and diseases directly related to obesity, amounting to more than $62 million in veterinary expenses. According to Nationwide, the top 10 dog and cat obesity-related conditions are:

Most Common Dog
Obesity-Related Conditions
Most Common Cat
Obesity-Related Conditions
1.      Arthritis 1.      Bladder/Urinary Tract Disease
2.      Bladder/Urinary Tract Disease 2.      Chronic Kidney Disease
3.      Liver Disease 3.      Diabetes
4.      Low Thyroid Hormone 4.      Asthma
5.      Torn Knee Ligaments 5.      Liver Disease
6.      Diabetes 6.      Arthritis
7.      Disease Disc in the Spine 7.      High Blood Pressure
8.      Chronic Kidney Disease 8.      Heart Failure
9.      Heart Failure 9.      Gall Bladder Disorder
10.  High Blood Pressure 10.  Immobility of Spine

 

You can read the entire Pets+ article at http://petsplusmag.com/news/headlines/3677-pet-obesity-rises-for-7th-straight-year-and-it-s-costly.html

Recommended Resources

Articles on Don’s Blog ( http://www.words-woofs-meows.com )

Shared Blog Post – Pet Obesity, Is there a Genetic Connection?http://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2016/09/27/shared-blog-post-pet-obesity-is-there-a-genetic-connection/

Helping Your Dog Thrive – Brambell’s Five Freedoms – Part 1http://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2018/01/03/helping-your-dog-thrive-brambells-five-freedoms-part-1/

Podcasts from The Woof Meow Show ( http://www.woofmeowshow.com )

Podcast – Pet Obesity with Dr. Chris BarryKindred Spirits Veterinary Clinichttp://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2016/08/24/podcast-pet-obesity-with-dr-chris-barry-kindred-spirits-veterinary-clinic/

 

Helping Your Dog Thrive – Brambell’s Five Freedoms – Part 1

< A version of this article was published in the January 2018 issue of Downeast Dog News >

We have a responsibility to make our dog’s life the best life possible. Your dog’s quality of life is directly under your control.

Over the next few months, I will be discussing Brambell’s Five Freedoms and how you can use them to help your dog have a long, fun-filled life. I will examine the role of nutrition, basic husbandry, veterinary care, training, behavior, and the management of your dog, as they all play a role in the quality of its life.

  • Brambell’s Five Freedoms originated in the United Kingdom in December of 1965. The Brambell Commission published its report over 50 years ago, yet it is still a very applicable standard for evaluating the holistic health of any animal kept by people, including dogs.

The Five Freedoms are Freedom from Hunger and Thirst, Freedom from Discomfort, Freedom from Pain, Injury or Disease, Freedom to Express Normal Behavior, and Freedom from Fear and Distress.

Fundamental to being able to assess an animal’s welfare is having a thorough knowledge of a species’ husbandry requirements, behavior, and how they communicate and express emotions. I invite you to consider some of the questions that I will pose in these columns and to contemplate how you would address them within Brambell’s Five Freedoms as you care for your dog.

Ensure your dog is free from hunger, thirst, and malnutrition.

At first read, this sounds relatively simple; provide your dog with food and water, and you have met their needs. Unfortunately, that is not the case.

Does the type of food we feed our dog matter? The dog has the digestive system of a carnivore; an animal meant to thrive on meat- animal protein and fat. When you feed your dog kibble or dry dog food, they are consuming food that is predominantly made up of carbohydrates. This highly processed “far from fresh food” is composed of 40% or more carbohydrates. The dog does not need carbohydrates in their diet. That is why you will not find the percent of carbohydrates listed in the Guaranteed Analysis panel on a bag of dog food. Kibble or dry dog food was not created to provide optimum nutrition for our dogs but to provide convenience for us and a long shelf life and higher profits for pet food manufacturers. Dogs can survive on kibble, but my question is: can they thrive on such an unnatural diet?

Can we say, in good conscience, that our dog is free from hunger, thirst, and malnutrition if we are feeding them a sub-optimal diet? Feeding a dog food that will provide them with the best nutrition possible is not inexpensive, at least when compared to grocery store kibble. However, when we start to factor in reduced veterinary bills with an improved diet, we may be further ahead when we feed the best food we can afford.

Is it better to have one pet and to feed her the best diet you can afford, or is it better to have multiple pets for social interaction? It is a question my wife and asked ourselves and is a reason we have downsized from a maximum of five dogs to one dog. We want to do the best we can for Muppy and having a single dog allows for more resources, both time and financial, to be focused on her.

What about pets on prescription diets? In some cases, a veterinarian may recommend a prescription diet for your dog that you can only get from a veterinarian. These specialized foods are available in a kibble or wet (canned) formula. Prescription diets are typically presented as being necessary to treat a specific disease or health issue. They are often much more expensive than a basic kibble, but because they are kibble, they will still be high in carbohydrates. Veterinarians who take a holistic approach to nutrition will seldom recommend kibble-based prescription diets preferring to suggest a diet consisting of fresh, whole food. Again, it comes down to choosing between optimal nutrition or our convenience? Which takes precedence?

What about pet obesity? Studies indicate that 50% of the pets in the U.S. are clinically obese. Obesity is typically due to overfeeding, an improper diet, and lack of exercise. Just as with humans, obesity will affect a dog’s health and welfare. It can tax your dog’s skeletal system and can even change behavior. How much of the obesity problem with our dogs is related to our feeding them diets high in carbohydrates, something they do not need?

Does the source of water you use matter? If you do not choose to drink water from your tap, should your dog? Should they at least be given a choice?

Next month we will examine more of Brambell’s Five Freedoms; Freedom from Pain, Injury or Disease, Freedom to Express Normal Behavior, and Freedom from Fear and Distress.

 

Recommended Resources

References

Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs-Farm Animal Welfare Committee-Five Freedoms: http://www.defra.gov.uk/fawc/about/five-freedoms

Press Statement”. Farm Animal Welfare Council. 1979-12-05: http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20121010012428/http://www.fawc.org.uk/pdf/fivefreedoms1979.pdf

Assessing Pets’ Welfare Using Brambell’s Five Freedoms, D. Hanson, APDT Chronicle of the Dog, Fall 2014http://www.greenacreskennel.com/images/stories/pdf/Articles/assessing%20pets%20welfare%20using%20brambells%20five%20freedoms-apdt_cotd_fall2014.pdf

 

Articles on Don’s Blog ( http://www.words-woofs-meows.com )

Animal Welfare – Assessing Pets’ Welfare Using Brambell’s Five Freedomshttp://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2014/10/01/animal-welfare-assessing-pets-welfare-using-brambells-five-freedoms/

Pet Nutrition – What Should I Feed My Pet?http://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2017/06/04/pet-nutrition-what-should-i-feed-my-pet/

Podcasts from The Woof Meow Show ( http://www.woofmeowshow.com )

What do you feed your pets?http://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2017/04/22/podcast-encore-what-do-you-feed-your-pets/

________________________________________________________________________
Don Hanson is the co-owner of the Green Acres Kennel Shop ( greenacreskennel.com ) in Bangor. He is a Bach Foundation Registered Animal Practitioner (BFRAP), Certified Dog Behavior Consultant (CDBC), Associate Certified Cat Behavior Consultant (ACCBC) and a Certified Professional Dog Trainer (CPDT-KA). He produces and co- hosts a weekly radio show and podcast, The Woof Meow Show heard on The Pulse AM620 WZON and streamed at http://www.wzonradio.com/ every Saturday at 9 AM. A list of upcoming shows and podcasts of past shows can be found at www.woofmeowshow.com. Don also writes about pets at his blog: www.words-woofs-meows.com. He is committed to pet care and pet training that is free of pain, force, and fear. The opinions in this post are those of Don Hanson.

©3JAN18, Donald J. Hanson, All Rights Reserved
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