Book Review – Natural Nutrition for Cats: The Path to Purrfect Health by Kymythy Schultze

I believe that providing our pets with species-appropriate nutrition is one of the most important things we can do to help our pets live a long life, but also a high-quality, vital life. Sadly, due to lack of knowledge, misinformation spread by big pet food companies, or choosing our convenience over our pet’s health this does not always happen.

My wife and I have been eager students of pet nutrition long before we even knew we would enjoy careers in the pet care services industry. We had a dog with severe medical issues that were related to his diet ( FMIhttp://bit.ly/Gus-Nutrition ) which caused us to devour everything we could learn from books, seminars, articles, people and more. We focused mostly on dogs at first then expanded to cats. When our newest cat, Boomer, developed nutritionally related health issues at a young age, we started looking for even more information on cats and nutrition. Like most things dog and cat, there is often less available about our feline friends.

Kymythy Schultze’s first book Natural Nutrition for Dogs and Cats has long been the book I recommend for clients that want to prepare a homemade diet for their pets. I like that it is short, simple, and easy to understand while at the same time being complete. When I heard about Kymythy’s latest book, Natural Nutrition for Cats: The Path to Purrfect Health I immediately added it to my “To Read” pile. As has happened more than once, I am kicking myself for not putting this book on the top of the pile sooner.

By reading Natural Nutrition for Cats: The Path to Purrfect Health, you will learn the how and why of feeding your cat for optimal health. Additionally, you will also learn about the relationship between veterinary schools, the veterinary community as a whole, and the big businesses that represent the vast majority of the pet food industry. The latter makes this book a “must read” for dog people in addition to cat lovers.

One of the things that I like best about Kymythy and her books is that they are based on common sense, something that seems to be disappearing from our world. For example, early on in the book, she states “A good diet for your cat is one that provides the correct nutrients, in the proper forms, that it needs to be healthy and happy. Plus, the regimen has to please you, too. If you’re uncomfortable with a particular way of feeding or if you don’t understand it, you probably shouldn’t be doing it. How you feed your cat must fit into your personal comfort zone and be good for your cat as well.” Kymythy’s book provides the reader with expert advice on feeding a cat, but Kymythy recognizes that not everyone will have the resources to feed as she does and she makes that clear. She provides the reader with the information that they need, seldom provided by pet food companies or veterinarians, so that you can make an educated decision that will be in the best interests of both you and your cat. As she notes “The main goal here is to get some real food into your feline friend!

Kymythy’s recommendations certainly have merit. We recently interviewed her on The Woof Meow ShowFMIhttp://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2017/07/31/podcast-pet-nutrition-with-kymythy-schultze-author-of-natural-nutrition-for-cats-the-path-to-purrfect-health/ ) where she told us that her most recent cat to cross the Rainbow Bridge lived to be thirty-two years old and that most of her cats lived into their mid-twenties. Kate and I were speechless for a few moments and those that know us, know that is a rarity. Kymythy obviously is on to something!

In Chapter 1, Kymythy starts by defining good health. She discusses the many health issues found in cat’s today (“Problems with skin, coat, parasites, teeth, weight, odor, digestion, kidney, thyroid, pancreas, diabetes, urinary, respiratory, and immune systems are not normal. They’re not signs of good health!”) which are all too often accepted as “normal” because they are becoming more and more prevalent. Then she discusses why what we feed our pets plays such a significant role in their health. Central to that theme is the importance of eating and feeding real food instead of processed products;  “As both humans and felines have strayed from eating fresh foods, both our species have suffered a huge increase in obesity, diabetes, allergies, cancer, behavior problems, general ill health, and more.

The book also discusses the anatomy and physiology of the cat and how that determines what food is biologically appropriate for them as a species. The cat is an obligatory carnivore which means that they MUST eat meat. Many of our cats who spend time outdoors routinely hunt, kill and consume what they have killed – preparing their meals just as nature intended. Mice and birds are a more natural source of nutrition for our cats than processed kibble which can be as much as 60% carbohydrates, something that the cat has no need for in their diet; “Even the National Research Council’s Subcommittee on Cat Nutrition states that “. . . no known dietary carbohydrate requirement exists for the cat . . .” Obesity is a major problem for both dogs and cats, and we all know the link between carbohydrates and obesity in humans. Pets are no different.

The cats need for water from the food that they eat is also addressed, something that cats do not get in sufficient quantities from dry food and treats. We also discussed this on The Woof Meow Show with Kymythy where she noted: “If your cat is going to a water bowl frequently it is likely they are not getting enough water in their food and may be dehydrated.” The cats instinctual need for water in their food is yet another example of why feeding fresh meat, or a quality canned food, at least as a supplement, is a better choice than only feeding your cat dry food.

In Chapter 4, Kymythy addresses pet kibble, cans, and the major pet food manufacturers. She discusses how pet food regulations are developed and how these regulations are, in her opinion, lacking. In reference to those that establish the regulations she states “The authors actually say, “Few nutritional requirements are known for the adult cat for maintenance or for pregnancy and lactation.” Kymythy then discusses how these commercial kibbles are tested, in a feeding trial where “Quality of life and longevity aren’t part of the test, and even a year-long feeding trial may not expose imbalances that take longer to affect a cat.”

If you are interested in pet food regulations and the scary underbelly of the pet food industry I would encourage you to watch the documentary Pet Fooled: A Look Inside A Questionable Industry ( FMI http://www.petfooled.com/  ).

Kymythy addresses what is in the bag in chapter six, explaining why “veterinarian recommended” on the bag is not as helpful as many assume. She reviews common ingredients used in cat food and tells you what to look for and more importantly what to avoid. As Kymythy states “One might think it reasonable to assume that the premium price of this brand of food and the fact that it’s sold through veterinarians would assure us of better-quality protein. But I suppose the lesson is: Don’t assume!

The concept of feeding our pets something that is not cooked is hard for some, especially veterinarians, to understand. In Chapter 7 Kymythy explains how cooking food for our pets, especially at high temperatures and pressures, can be detrimental. She states: “Research at the National Cancer Institute and John Hopkins University in the U.S. and the Queen Elizabeth Hospital in London, and other studies— including those conducted by experts in Japan and Europe— show that cooking meat with high temperatures creates chemicals that aren’t present when it’s raw. Seventeen different carcinogenic (cancer-causing) compounds develop that collectively are called heterocyclic amines (HCAs). These HCAs interfere with the body’s genetic structure and are proven to cause cancer in animals. They’re specifically linked to cancer of the stomach, pancreas, colon, heart, and breast. The substances are even found in nursing youngsters, so we know they travel through breast milk.” She also cites a study by Dr. Paul Kouchakoff that examined the effect of cooked and raw food on the immune system; “After much research, he concluded that raw food was viewed by the immune system as “friendly,” and cooked food was viewed as dangerous.” Lastly, Kymythy discusses the 10-year study by Dr. Francis Pottenger that demonstrated that cats fed an entirely raw-food diet were vastly healthier than those fed a cooked diet.

She concludes Chapter 7 stating “It’s ironic, really, how all these years later, many cat lovers are actually still repeating this research by feeding cooked petfood products to their cats. And not surprisingly, many are seeing the same ill-health effects that Dr. Pottenger saw in his cooked-food cats. These people certainly don’t intend to hurt their animal friends, it’s just that the cooked-product companies are very large, powerful, and convincing in their marketing. So who’s to blame for our cats’ health problems?

In Chapter 8 Kymythy discusses responsibility and the fact that as our cat’s guardians, we are ultimately responsible for their health. She also discusses, as she did on The Woof Meow Show, many of her concerns about the pet food industry and the overly close relationship they have with veterinarians, especially veterinary schools. Kymythy notes in the book: “…when I was studying animal nutrition at Cornell University’s College of Veterinary Medicine a few years ago, only a couple of my professors weren’t paid employees of petfood companies.” Like Kymythy, I find this corporate bias in our educational system very alarming.

In our interview with Kymythy, she also talked about how little time was spent in her nutrition classes at Cornell learning about real food; whole unprocessed, food in its natural form. However, when one considers that most of these “nutrition classes” are taught by a pet food company employee and that those companies do not use real food in their product, I guess one should not be surprised, although I would hope everyone would be disappointed.

In Natural Nutrition for Cats: The Path to Purrfect Health Kymythy also discusses the brilliant marketing strategies used by big pet food companies. What she says is so important I am quoting her below.

The biggest petfood companies hire brilliant marketers to sell their products. After all, what could be better than having experts (veterinarians) endorse your product? How did this come about? Well, one of the parent companies that’s become very involved with vets also makes toothpaste. Do you remember the old advertisement that boasted eight out of ten dentists recommend a particular brand? It was a brilliant campaign and put this firm at the top of toothpaste sales.

At the time, the company also had a very small petfood division they were about to sell, but an executive came forward with a great idea: If they could use the same tactic with this branch as they had with their toothpaste, they’d be equally successful. So they used the pharmaceutical industry’s practice of spending tons of money to woo doctors. In fact, a retired sales executive from the petfood company commented on why this marketing strategy works so well: “It’s just like taking drugs: You go to the doctor, and he prescribes something for you, and you don’t much question what the doctor says. It’s the same with animals.”

They know that the trust cat guardians have in vets is so strong that they’ll feed what they’re told without question. So the manufacturer spends a great deal of money enforcing that connection. In fact, other than universities, this company is the country’s largest employer of vets! They fund research and nutrition courses and professorships at veterinary colleges and offer a formal nutrition-certification program for technicians. They’ve also written a widely used textbook on animal nutrition that’s given free of charge to veterinary students, who also receive stipends and get products at zero or almost-zero charge.

This relationship doesn’t end after graduation. The corporation sends veterinarians to seminars on how to better sell their products, provides sales-goal-oriented promotions, gives them lots of promotional tools, and offers big discounts so that vets make more money on product sales.

Although not discussed in Kymythy’s book, as it is a recent development, a major pet food company is now purchasing veterinary clinics adding, even more, bias and pressure for the veterinarian, who will now be an employee of that company, to exclusively promote the company’s products. This direct financial relationship affects not only pet food but also vaccines. ( FMIhttp://healthypets.mercola.com/sites/healthypets/archive/2017/06/25/pets-over-vaccination.aspx )

In Chapter 9, Kymythy discusses how she decided to feed her cats by making her food at home, instead of relying on any commercial product. As she points out, while some call feeding pets real food a fad, commercial pet food is a relatively new idea. For hundreds of years, people with dogs and cats fed their pet’s real food that they prepared themselves. Some in the veterinary community will argue that there is no proof that feeding a pet a raw diet or homemade diet is safe. Kymythy states: ”There’s no proof that feeding your cats a processed pet food is better for them than a properly prepared meal of fresh, species-appropriate food. And anyone who says cats are living longer today because of those processed products also has no proof. Certainly, a cat may live longer today if it’s not outside being hit by a car or attacked by another predator. But the cats of my grandmother’s day were frequently living well into their late 20s without benefit of processed products. Feeding real food is really just the longest used way of feeding cats.” The fact that no studies exist to support that feeding processed foods provides optimal nutrition are also made by veterinarians Dr. Karen Becker and Dr. Barbara Royal in the documentary Pet Fooled: A Look Inside A Questionable Industry. ( FMI http://www.petfooled.com/  )

Kymythy concludes the book by discussing how you can start making food for your cat. “The C.A.T. diet— CatAppropriate and Tasty! It’s a simple combination of raw meat (muscle and organ), bone, and a few supplements (or “supps” as we call them at my house). The ingredients provide every known nutrient, and the meal is easy to prepare.” She discusses shopping for supplies, preparing the food and how to transition your cat to their new diet.

If you want to learn how you can make healthy, nutritious meals for your cat or if you just want to find out more about cat nutrition and the good and bad of the pet food industry, I highly recommend Natural Nutrition for Cats: The Path to Purrfect Health by Kymythy Schultze

Articles on Don’s Blog (http://www.words-woofs-meows.com)

Pet Nutrition – What Should I Feed My Pet?http://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2017/06/04/pet-nutrition-what-should-i-feed-my-pet/

What do you feed your dog?http://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2016/05/31/pet-nutrition-what-do-you-feed-your-dog/

Pet Nutrition: Some Myths and Facts – Part 1 – My story with Gushttp://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2017/04/03/pet-nutrition-some-myths-and-facts-part-1-my-story-with-gus/

Pet Nutrition: Some Myths and Facts – Part 2 – In the Spring 2017 issue of Maine DOG Magazine, Coming here soon!

Pet Nutrition: Some Myths and Facts – Part 3 – Look for this article in the Fall 2017 issue of Maine DOG Magazine, Coming here soon! –

Pet Nutrition – Should I Feed My Pet A Raw Diet?http://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2016/09/11/pet-nutrition-should-i-feed-my-pet-a-raw-diet/

Video – The Science and Dogma of Pet Nutrition with Dr. Richard Patton – A video of animal nutritionist, Dr. Richard Patton’s presentation, The Science and Dogma of Pet Nutrition, presented by Green Acres Kennel Shop in Bangor, ME on April 28th, 2016. – http://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2016/09/10/pet-nutrition-the-science-and-dogma-of-pet-nutrition-with-dr-richard-patton/

Reflections on 20 Years as a Pet Care Professional – Changes in Pet Food and Nutrition – part 1http://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2015/11/23/reflections-on-20-years-as-a-pet-care-professional-changes-in-pet-food-and-nutrition-part-1/

Reflections on 20 Years as a Pet Care Professional – Pet Food and Nutrition – part 2http://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2015/12/15/reflections-on-20-years-as-a-pet-care-professional-pet-food-and-nutrition-part-2/


Book Review – Ruined by Excess, Perfected by Lack – The paradox of pet nutrition by Richard Patton
http://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2016/03/16/book-review-ruined-by-excess-perfected-by-lack-the-paradox-of-pet-nutrition-by-richard-patton/

Nutrition – Which Brand of Pet Food is the Best? – Part 1 – http://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2014/06/01/nutrition-which-brand-of-pet-food-is-the-best-part-1/

Nutrition – Which Brand of Pet Food is the Best? – Part 2 – http://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2014/07/01/nutrition-which-brand-of-pet-food-is-the-best-part-2/

Nutrition – Which Brand of Pet Food is the Best? – Part 3 – http://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2014/08/01/nutrition-which-brand-of-pet-food-is-the-best-part-3/

Nutrition – Why Rotating Diets Makes Sensehttp://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2012/05/04/nutrition-why-rotating-diets-makes-sense/

Nutrition – Determining True Pet Food Costshttp://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2008/11/08/nutrition-determining-true-pet-food-costs/

Pet Nutrition – How Much Fat Is In Your Pet’s Food?  – http://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2014/10/12/pet-nutrition-how-much-fat-is-in-your-pets-food/

Pet Nutrition – New Zealand dog diet study a wake-up call for dog nutritionhttp://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2017/05/19/pet-nutrition-new-zealand-dog-diet-study-a-wake-up-call-for-dog-nutrition/

Pet Nutrition –Vital Essentials® Pet Foodhttp://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2016/08/14/pet-nutrition-vital-essentials-pet-food/

Shared Blog Post – FDA on a Witch Hunt Against Commercial Pet Food? A Little Spritz of This Makes Pet Food Far Saferhttp://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2016/11/28/shared-blog-post-fda-on-a-witch-hunt-against-commercial-pet-food-a-little-spritz-of-this-makes-pet-food-far-safer/

Pet Nutrition – From Dr. Karen Becker – A Vegetarian or Vegan Diet Is Not Healthy For Your Dog or Cathttp://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2015/09/27/pet-nutrition-from-dr-karen-becker-a-vegetarian-or-vegan-diet-is-not-healthy-for-your-dog-or-cat/

Podcasts from The Woof Meow Show (http://www.woofmeowshow.com)

Podcast – Pet Nutrition with Kymythy Schultze Author of Natural Nutrition for Cats: The Path to Purrfect Health – http://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2017/07/31/podcast-pet-nutrition-with-kymythy-schultze-author-of-natural-nutrition-for-cats-the-path-to-purrfect-health/

What do you feed your pets?http://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2017/04/22/podcast-encore-what-do-you-feed-your-pets/

Podcast – Pet Nutrition with Dr. Richard Pattonhttp://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2016/04/03/podcast-pet-nutrition-with-dr-richard-patton/

Podcast – Pet Fooled – A Look Inside A Questionable Industry with Kohl Harringtonhttp://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2017/05/06/podcast-pet-fooled-a-look-inside-a-questionable-industry-with-kohl-harrington/

Books

Beginnings – Getting Your Dog and Cat Started on a Raw Diet by Melinda Miller and Honoring Your Cat’s Natural Diet by Terri Grow < Click here for a free download >

Feline Nutrition: Nutrition for the Optimum Health and Longevity of your Cat – Lynn Curtis

Natural Nutrition for Cats: The Path to Purr-fect Health – Kymythy Schultze

Natural Nutrition for Dogs and Cats – The Ultimate Diet – Kymythy Schultze

Ruined by Excess, Perfected by Lack – Dr. Richard Patton

See Spot Live Longer – Steve Brown and Beth Taylor

The Truth About Pet Foods – Dr. Randy Wysong

Unlocking the Canine Ancestral Diet – Steve Brown

 

©31JUL17, Donald J. Hanson, All Rights Reserved
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Podcast – Pet Nutrition with Kymythy Schultze Author of Natural Nutrition for Cats: The Path to Purrfect Health

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In this episode of The Woof Meow Show from July 29, 2017, Kate and Don interview Kymythy Schultze, a Clinical Nutritionist, and Animal Health Instructor, and the author of Natural Nutrition for Dogs and Cats: The Ultimate Diet, The Natural Nutrition No-Cook Book, and Natural Nutrition for Cats: The Path to Purrfect Health. Kymythy’s first book Natural Nutrition for Dogs and Cats has long been the first book I recommend for clients that want to prepare a homemade diet for their pets. I like that it is short, simple, and easy to understand while at the same time being complete. Kate and I recently read Kymythy’s book, The Ultimate Diet and Natural Nutrition for Cats and were equally impressed.

We start our show by asking Kymythy how she became interested in nutrition and she explains how her interest started with her health problems which improved as she began paying attention to what she ate. As her health improved, Kymythy began looking at how better nutrition could improve the life of her pets and the wildlife she rehabilitated. Kymythy went on to become a Certified Clinical Nutritionist for humans and then studied animal nutrition at Cornell University’s school of veterinary medicine. Kymythy notes that while her formal education was invaluable, she has also found that like with so many other things, common sense plays a huge role in nutrition.

Kate asked about common nutritional traits between dogs and cats. Kymythy noted that both cats and dog carnivores, but that the dogs are more opportunistic and will sometimes eat things that are not good for them. One only needs to look at their physical anatomy to tell that the dog and cat are predatory carnivores.

We discuss the terms “biologically appropriate food” and “species appropriate nutrition” and what they mean. Kymythy explains how nature and evolution have designed animals to eat specific things. Cats and dogs are designed to eat meat. From their canine teeth to their digestive system they have evolved to kill, eat, and digest food that may even be teeming with bacteria.

In her latest book, Kymythy talks about a reader in Scotland who expressed concern about the big pet food companies, many who actively deny the fact that cats and dogs are carnivores, and the influence these companies have on what veterinary students are taught about nutrition.

We asked Kymythy to tell us about the nutrition classes she took at Cornell. She expressed concern, which we share that so many of the “self-described experts” and veterinary nutritionists are being trained by the pet food companies that promote heavily processed food. When these students go on to become veterinarians, they then go on to promote foods from these same companies. Kymythy noted that only one of her professors at Cornell was NOT a paid employee of a pet food company. One has to wonder how these professors can be unbiased in what they teach.

Kymythy told us that real, fresh food was never discussed in her classes at Cornell. The only foods discussed were highly processed commercial pet food. I have noted some of Kymythy’s comments about her Cornell experience below.

Food, in its natural form, really wasn’t discussed.” “How nutrition was approached was all about excess and deficiency. About specific nutrients like calcium, phosphorous, zinc, copper, that sort of thing. It wasn’t about food.” “We didn’t really learn much about food. We learned about products, and excess and deficiency.”

It was a real eye-opening experience for me, it really was, going to Cornell, because it was not what I thought it was going to be. I thought we were going to be talking about food. Because I consider that nutrition. And if we’re gonna talk about nutrients let’s talk about nutrients from real food. It really surprised me that really was not included at all. It was more talking about individual nutrients in excess or deficiency states and products, what products to use. That was the bigee. It wasn’t that a dog or cat may need more of this type of food, it was what product would be best to use in this case.“

In segment two we focus on cats, asking what nutrients they need to be healthy. Kymythy explained that if we look at what many of our cats do when left on their own, kill and consume small rodents and birds, the answer is pretty obvious. Their natural behavior tells us they need muscle meat, organ meat, and bones. The best diet for our cats is one that will mimic that as closely as possible. Kymythy mentions the last cat of hers that passed lived to be 32 years old on such a diet. She notes that having cats live into their late 20’s is the norm for her.  Kymythy stressed that length of life should not be our only concern and that quality of life is equally important. The quality of the nutrition we provide for our pets plays a huge role in the quality of their lives.

Our discussion then shifts to water as a nutrient and its extreme importance to cats. Unfortunately, processed food does not contain water in the necessary quantities to meet a cat’s needs. Because of their low thirst drive, acts may not ingest the amount of water they need to be in optimal health. That is why cats need to have wet food in their diet. A natural diet, like a piece of meat, would have a high moisture content compared to a bowl of kibble with very little moisture. If your cat is going to a water bowl frequently it is likely they are not getting enough water in their food and may be dehydrated.

Kymythy also discusses how young kittens imprint on food and how it can be difficult to change a cat’s diet as they get older. Cats imprinted on kibble can almost become addicted to dry food, which is not in their best interest. While transitioning to a better diet and be difficult, Kymythy has never had a cat that she could not transition to a more nutritious food.

In the third segment of the show, Kate asks Kymythy if a cat that has been fed kibble all its life will have difficulty digesting a raw food. Kymythy indicates that feeding a poor diet can have a negative effect on the gut flora; probiotics, and enzymes. She explains that simply adding appropriate probiotics and digestive enzymes to the new food may help them make the transition.

Kymythy summarized the initial steps people can take in improving their cat’s health.

  • Feed a species appropriate diet, compromised of meat and bone
  • Learn all you can
    • however, be cautious, especially on the internet
    • Kate and Don recommend reading Kymythy’s book- Natural Nutrition for Cats: The Path to Purrfect Health by Kymythy Schultze
  • Kymythy emphasizes “There are things you need to know, but it is not complicated.”

< Click to Listen to Podcast >

 

Contact Info for Kymythy

You can learn more about Kymythy and her books at the following places. Please note that Kymythy also offers private nutrition counseling for pets.

Websitewww.kymythy.com

Facebookhttps://www.facebook.com/kymythynaturalnutrition/

Recommended Resources

Articles on Don’s Blog (http://www.words-woofs-meows.com)

 

Book Review – Natural Nutrition for Cats: The Path to Purrfect Health by Kymythy Schultzehttp://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2017/07/31/book-review-natural-nutrition-for-cats-the-path-to-purrfect-health-by-kymythy-schultze/

Pet Nutrition – What Should I Feed My Pet?http://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2017/06/04/pet-nutrition-what-should-i-feed-my-pet/

What do you feed your dog?http://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2016/05/31/pet-nutrition-what-do-you-feed-your-dog/

Pet Nutrition: Some Myths and Facts – Part 1 – My story with Gushttp://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2017/04/03/pet-nutrition-some-myths-and-facts-part-1-my-story-with-gus/

Pet Nutrition: Some Myths and Facts – Part 2 – In the Spring 2017 issue of Maine DOG Magazine, Coming here soon!

Pet Nutrition: Some Myths and Facts – Part 3 – Look for this article in the Fall 2017 issue of Maine DOG Magazine, Coming here soon! –

Pet Nutrition – Should I Feed My Pet A Raw Diet?http://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2016/09/11/pet-nutrition-should-i-feed-my-pet-a-raw-diet/

Video – The Science and Dogma of Pet Nutrition with Dr. Richard Patton – A video of animal nutritionist, Dr. Richard Patton’s presentation, The Science and Dogma of Pet Nutrition, presented for Green Acres Kennel Shop in Bangor, ME on April 28th, 2016. – http://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2016/09/10/pet-nutrition-the-science-and-dogma-of-pet-nutrition-with-dr-richard-patton/

Reflections on 20 Years as a Pet Care Professional – Changes in Pet Food and Nutrition – part 1http://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2015/11/23/reflections-on-20-years-as-a-pet-care-professional-changes-in-pet-food-and-nutrition-part-1/

Reflections on 20 Years as a Pet Care Professional – Pet Food and Nutrition – part 2http://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2015/12/15/reflections-on-20-years-as-a-pet-care-professional-pet-food-and-nutrition-part-2/


Book Review – Ruined by Excess, Perfected by Lack – The paradox of pet nutrition by Richard Patton
http://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2016/03/16/book-review-ruined-by-excess-perfected-by-lack-the-paradox-of-pet-nutrition-by-richard-patton/

Nutrition – Which Brand of Pet Food is the Best? – Part 1 – http://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2014/06/01/nutrition-which-brand-of-pet-food-is-the-best-part-1/

Nutrition – Which Brand of Pet Food is the Best? – Part 2 – http://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2014/07/01/nutrition-which-brand-of-pet-food-is-the-best-part-2/

Nutrition – Which Brand of Pet Food is the Best? – Part 3 – http://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2014/08/01/nutrition-which-brand-of-pet-food-is-the-best-part-3/

Nutrition – Why Rotating Diets Makes Sensehttp://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2012/05/04/nutrition-why-rotating-diets-makes-sense/

Nutrition – Determining True Pet Food Costshttp://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2008/11/08/nutrition-determining-true-pet-food-costs/

Pet Nutrition – How Much Fat Is In Your Pet’s Food?  – http://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2014/10/12/pet-nutrition-how-much-fat-is-in-your-pets-food/

Pet Nutrition – New Zealand dog diet study a wake-up call for dog nutritionhttp://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2017/05/19/pet-nutrition-new-zealand-dog-diet-study-a-wake-up-call-for-dog-nutrition/

Pet Nutrition –Vital Essentials® Pet Foodhttp://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2016/08/14/pet-nutrition-vital-essentials-pet-food/

Shared Blog Post – FDA on a Witch Hunt Against Commercial Pet Food? A Little Spritz of This Makes Pet Food Far Saferhttp://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2016/11/28/shared-blog-post-fda-on-a-witch-hunt-against-commercial-pet-food-a-little-spritz-of-this-makes-pet-food-far-safer/

Pet Nutrition – From Dr. Karen Becker – A Vegetarian or Vegan Diet Is Not Healthy For Your Dog or Cathttp://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2015/09/27/pet-nutrition-from-dr-karen-becker-a-vegetarian-or-vegan-diet-is-not-healthy-for-your-dog-or-cat/

Podcasts from The Woof Meow Show (http://www.woofmeowshow.com)

What do you feed your pets?http://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2017/04/22/podcast-encore-what-do-you-feed-your-pets/

Podcast – Pet Nutrition with Dr. Richard Pattonhttp://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2016/04/03/podcast-pet-nutrition-with-dr-richard-patton/

Podcast – Pet Fooled – A Look Inside A Questionable Industry with Kohl Harringtonhttp://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2017/05/06/podcast-pet-fooled-a-look-inside-a-questionable-industry-with-kohl-harrington/

Podcast – Raw Diets and the Carnivore Meat Company-Vital Essentials-Dee Ferranti and Jodi Langellottihttp://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2016/04/17/podcast-raw-diets-and-the-carnivore-meat-company-vital-essentials-dee-ferranti-and-jodi-langellotti/

Podcast – Holistic and Complementary Wellness for Pets – Nutrition and Raw Food for Pets with Bette Schubert from Bravo Pet Foodshttp://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2016/10/02/podcast-holistic-and-complementary-wellness-for-pets-nutrition-and-raw-food-for-pets-with-bette-schubert-from-bravo-pet-foods/

Podcast – The Rationale for Feeding Pets Raw Foods with Bette Schubert from Bravo Pet Foodshttp://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2016/08/03/podcast-the-rationale-for-feeding-pets-raw-foods-with-bette-schubert-from-bravo-pet-foods/

Podcast – Bravo’s Raw Pets Food, Treats, Chewables and Bones with Bette Shuberthttp://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2013/08/10/podcast-bravos-raw-pets-food-treats-chewables-and-bones-with-bette-shubert/

Podcast – Feeding Your Pet A Raw Diet with Gary Bursell of Steve’s Real Food for Petshttp://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2013/03/16/podcast-feeding-your-pet-a-raw-diet-with-gary-bursell-of-steves-real-food-for-pets/

Podcast – Feeding Your Pet A Raw Diet with Nicole Lindsley of Steve’s Real Food for Petshttp://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2013/03/23/podcast-feeding-your-pet-a-raw-diet-with-nicole-lindsley-of-steves-real-food-for-pets/

Podcast – Pet Obesity with Dr. Chris Barry – Kindred Spirits Veterinary Clinichttp://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2016/08/24/podcast-pet-obesity-with-dr-chris-barry-kindred-spirits-veterinary-clinic/

Books

Beginnings – Getting Your Dog and Cat Started on a Raw Diet by Melinda Miller and Honoring Your Cat’s Natural Diet by Terri Grow < Click here for a free download >

Feline Nutrition: Nutrition for the Optimum Health and Longevity of your Cat – Lynn Curtis

Natural Nutrition for Cats: The Path to Purr-fect Health – Kymythy Schultze

Natural Nutrition for Dogs and Cats – The Ultimate Diet – Kymythy Schultze

Ruined by Excess, Perfected by Lack – Dr. Richard Patton

See Spot Live Longer – Steve Brown and Beth Taylor

The Truth About Pet Foods – Dr. Randy Wysong

Unlocking the Canine Ancestral Diet – Steve Brown

 

 

©31JUL17, Donald J. Hanson, All Rights Reserved
< Click for Copyright and Use Policy >

Does My Dogs Breed Matter? – Part 1 – The Herding and Hound Groups

< A version of this article was published in the July 2017 issue of Downeast Dog News>

< Updated 14SEP17 >

< You can listen to a podcast on this topic that was broadcast on The Woof Meow on 16SEP17 by clicking here >

< UPDATED – 3SEP17 – All three parts of this series have been compiled into a single article at http://bit.ly/DoesDogBreedMatter >

I recently saw a meme posted on Facebook with the words “Getting a dog without understanding the breed is like buying a house without an inspection.” A discussion followed as to whether or not this was a good way to emphasize that breed matters when you are selecting a dog that will best fit into your family, lifestyle, and the environment in which you and your dog will live. I agree with the sentiment of the text in this meme; however, I believe that the question of how important breed is when selecting a dog is far too important to leave to a discussion on Facebook. If you want the greatest probability of getting a great canine companion, you need to consider breed before purchasing or adopting a dog, and your research needs to extend beyond social media and avid fans of the breed.

The American Kennel Club (AKC) currently recognizes 202 different breeds of dogs organized into seven groups: Herding, Hound, Non-Sporting, Sporting, Terrier, Toy, and Working. Different breeds of dogs exist because each breed was developed to address a particular need or role in serving humans.

In some cases, the AKC group description is helpful in understanding what a dog was bred to do, while some of the groups contain breeds with a wide variety of individual physical and behavioral traits and I question how they were lumped into the same group. However, looking at the Group is a good place to start. Below you will find my thoughts on each AKC group and factors that I recommend you consider before deciding which breed is the best for you. Please recognize that you want to choose a breed that is also the best choice for your family, your lifestyle, and the environment in which you live. The lifespan of a dog, which can also be breed dependent, can range from six to eighteen years. As you consider your current lifestyle and environment, think about the future and what your life will be like when your dog is older. Adding children to your life or moving from a rural to an urban environment should be considered when you choose your breed.

FMIhttp://bit.ly/FindingTheRightDogForYou

 

Herding Group – “All breeds share the fabulous ability to control the movement of other animals. …pure instinct prompts many of these dogs to gently herd their owners, especially the children of the family.1

The most popular of the breeds in the Herding group is the German Shepherd Dog, which has been second on the AKC’s list of Most Popular Dog Breeds for the past four years2. Other dogs in this group include Australian Shepherds (#16), Corgis (#18, #69), Shetland Sheepdogs (#24), Collies (#37), Border Collies (#38), and more.

I describe many dogs in the herding group as “Those with a passion for bringing order out of chaos.” Often the dogs in this group need to herd and will attempt to round-up everything from your livestock, to ducks at the park, your cats, other dogs, the neighbor’s children, and yes, even stationary tennis balls. Some breeds herd with their eyes while others use quick, but effective and often uncomfortable nips with their teeth. If you live in a chaotic household and have children nearby, you should carefully consider if a dog from the herding group is a good choice for your situation. On a positive note, the dogs in the herding group have been bred to work in close collaboration with a person so they can be easier to train.

Hound Group – “Most hounds share the common ancestral trait of being used for hunting. Some use acute scenting powers to follow a trail. Others demonstrate a phenomenal gift of stamina as they relentlessly run down quarry.1

The favorite breed in the Hound group is the Beagle, which has been the fifth most popular dog in the USA since 20152. Other dogs in the Hound group include Dachshunds (#13), Bassett Hounds (#39), Bloodhounds (#52), Greyhounds (#151), and more.

The key thing to remember about the AKC’s comments on the Hound group is that hounds were bred to hunt by selectively breeding them to emphasize their predatory instincts. Some hounds use their sight, and some use their impressive sense of smell, but they are both experts at detecting and chasing down prey. Since hounds often work independently of their handler, unlike the breeds in the Herding and Sporting group, a hound may be more challenging to train. While it is not impossible to train a hound to be off-leash in unfenced areas, it will typically take more time and higher value rewards. Some hounds will never reach off-leash reliability no matter how skilled you are at training. Because many of the hound breeds have been bred to work as a group, they can have excellent social skills and will often do well with other dogs.

FMIhttp://bit.ly/ChoosingADogTrainer

Many dogs in shelters are labeled as being part hound, and we see a wide variety of them for both boarding and daycare. If you put the time and effort into training your hound and have reasonable expectations, they can make excellent, laid back companions. Yes, I said laid back. I cannot think of any hound I have met that I would classify as hyper.

Some would argue that future behavior is all about the environment and the way a dog is raised. Environment certainly plays a tremendous role in a dog’s temperament but so do genetics, and we cannot change genetics. If you want the best possible companion that meets your criteria of “the perfect dog,” then spend some time researching the breeds before you get your dog.

Next month I will discuss the Non-Sporting, Sporting, Terrier, and Toy groups.

References

1 AKC website – http://www.akc.org/public-education/resources/dog-breeds-sorted-groups/

2 Most Popular Dog Breeds – Full Ranking List – http://www.akc.org/content/news/articles/most-popular-dog-breeds-full-ranking-list/

Recommended Resources

Articles on Don’s Blog (http://www.words-woofs-meows.com)

Does My Dogs Breed Matter? – Part 2 –  http://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2017/08/02/does-my-dogs-breed-matter-part-2-the-sporting-non-sporting-terrier-and-toy-groups/

Does My Dogs Breed Matter? – Part 3http://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2017/09/01/does-my-dogs-breed-matter-part-3-the-working-group-and-mixed-breeds/

Finding the Right Dog for You and Your Family – http://bit.ly/FindingTheRightDogForYou

How to choose a dog trainerhttp://bit.ly/ChoosingADogTrainer

________________________________________________________________________
Don Hanson is the co-owner of the Green Acres Kennel Shop (greenacreskennel.com) in Bangor. He is a Bach Foundation Registered Animal Practitioner (BFRAP), Certified Dog Behavior Consultant (CDBC), Associate Certified Cat Behavior Consultant (ACCBC) and a Certified Professional Dog Trainer (CPDT-KA). He produces and co- hosts a weekly radio show and podcast, The Woof Meow Show heard on The Pulse AM620 WZON and streamed at http://www.wzonradio.com/ every Saturday at 9 AM. A list of upcoming shows and podcasts of past shows can be found at www.woofmeowshow.com. Don also writes about pets at his blog: www.words-woofs-meows.com.

©29JUL17, Donald J. Hanson, All Rights Reserved
< Click for Copyright and Use Policy >

Podcast – A Holistic Approach to Vaccines for Dogs – Part 2 w/Dr. Judy Herman

< Click to Listen to Podcast >

In this episode of The Woof Meow Show on July 22, 2017, the second in a two-part series on vaccinations for dogs, Kate and Don talk with Dr. Judy Herman of the Animal Wellness Center in Augusta, Maine. In this show, we start by discussing what the American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA) classifies as non-core vaccines, those not required by every dog.

The first vaccine we discuss is the one for Canine Infectious Respiratory Disease Complex (CIRDC), more commonly known as canine cough, or sometimes kennel cough. Dr. Herman’s starts off by explaining that there are many infectious agents that can cause upper respiratory disease in a dog.  This is a vaccination that should be considered for a dog that is around other dogs, such as a show dog, a dog that boards or goes to daycare, a dog that visits the dog park, or any dog that is frequently around other dogs. She explains that they are various types of vaccines; intranasal, intraoral, and injectable, which should not be mixed. Dr. Herman also discusses the homeopathic nosode for kennel cough, which she has found to be very effective.

Nosodes are not a vaccine. They are a type of homeopathic remedy that is made from diseased tissue or discharge. Nosodes do not work the same as a vaccine and do not give one immunity. The nosode stimulates the body’s immune system to fight off the disease. Typically the kennel cough nosode is given before potential exposure, such as before a boarding stay. Unlike a vaccine, it does not offer long-term protection. The kennel cough nosode has been researched by Dr. Christopher Day in England. The study indicated that the dogs that received the nosode had little or no symptoms.

Green Acres Kennel Shop does accept the Kennel Cough vaccine instead of the canine cough vaccine as long as a client provides proof that the nosode was prescribed and dispensed by their dog’s veterinarian. Nosodes are not something you should purchase and administer without a veterinary guidance.

Don asked, and Dr. Herman explains, why dogs that are vaccinated for CIRDC still sometimes come down with the symptoms of canine cough. Vaccines do not always work with some animals, just like the flu vaccine used with humans does not always work.

In segment two, we discuss canine Leptospirosis, a vaccine against the Leptospirosis bacteria. This bacteria is passed in the urine of rodent’s skunks, raccoons, beavers, porcupines, and other wildlife. This bacteria survives in pools of stagnant water. It is seen more frequently in city dogs and smaller dogs. It causes acute kidney disease which can be treated. You need to assess your dog’s potential exposure to these risks before you decide if this vaccine makes sense for your dog. Dr. Herman indicates that there are adverse reactions to this vaccine and that it should not be given to puppies under 12 weeks of age. Although the Leptospirosis vaccine is supposed to be good for a year, many experts are not confident that it is effective for that long. There are several different types of Leptospirosis, but the vaccine does typically not cover all of these types. There is a nosode for Leptospirosis which would be available from homeopathic veterinarians. In Cuba, a Leptospirosis nosode has been used with humans, where Leptospirosis is a problem, with great success.

Lyme disease and the vaccines for it is the subject of segment three of our show. Lyme has been a concern in New England since the late 70’s, and with tick populations on the rise, it is becoming of greater concern. Specialists indicate that symptoms are more likely in; dogs less than two and immune-compromised dogs. Ninety percent of dogs infected with Lyme do not get sick. The best way to prevent Lyme is by preventing ticks. The vaccine is about 70% effective. There is a nosode for Lyme, but there are questions as to what protocol one would use.

Prevention through repellents, and checking your dog on a regular basis is the best bet for preventing Lyme. If your dog has already been exposed to Lyme, it is questionable whether or not the Lyme vaccine would be helpful. Also, the vaccine does not prevent Lyme Nephritis (inflammation of the kidneys).

Lastly, we discuss adverse reactions to vaccines; what to look for and what to do. An acute anaphylactic reaction usually occurs in the first fifteen minutes after a vaccine.  Symptoms include the face swelling up, breathing impairment, and shock, which will need immediate treatment by a veterinarian. Other symptoms include fever, vomiting, and diarrhea, and may not occur as much as a week later. Dr. Herman has also seen dogs have seizures post-vaccine. Adverse reactions to vaccines should be reported to your veterinarian and (AAHA website?)

Long-term adverse reactions can be immune mediated skin disease, thyroid disease, and even behavioral changes.

< Click to Listen to Podcast >

To Contact Dr. Herman

Animal Wellness Center
95 Northern Avenue, Augusta, ME 04330

(207) 623-1177

officeawc@roadrunner.com

Website:  http://www.judithhermandvm.com/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mainehomeopathicvet/

Recommended Resources

Articles on Don’s Blog (http://www.words-woofs-meows.com)

Vaccinations–Interviews with Dr. Ron Schultzhttp://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2013/07/15/vaccinations-interviews-with-dr-ron-schultz/

How to Report Adverse Reactions to Vaccines, Drugs, Devices, Foods, and Flea and Tick Products – http://bit.ly/ReportAdverseReactions

Complementary Medicine – Tikken – Vaccines, Aggression & Homeopathy — http://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2014/10/06/complementary-medicine-tikken-vaccines-aggression-homeopathy/

Shared Blog Post – It’s Time to Put a Stop to the Mindless Over-Vaccination of Petshttp://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2017/07/05/shared-blog-post-its-time-to-put-a-stop-to-the-mindless-over-vaccination-of-pets/

 

Podcasts from The Woof Meow Show (http://www.woofmeowshow.com)

 

Podcast – A Holistic Approach to Vaccines for Dogs – Part 1 w/Dr. Judy Herman –

Meet the Veterinarian with Dr. Judy Herman from the Animal Wellness Center — http://traffic.libsyn.com/woofmeowshow/WoofMeowShow-2014-07-12-Meet_the_Vet_Judy_Herman.mp3

Vaccinations- Why they are important, Core Vaccines & Vaccination Schedules w/Dr. Ronald Schultz (June 22nd, 2013) http://traffic.libsyn.com/woofmeowshow/WoofMeowShow-2013-06-22-Vaccinations-1.mp3

Vaccinations, Titer Testing, Non-Core Vaccines and Canine Infectious Respiratory Disease Complex with Dr. Ron Schultz (June 29th, 2013) http://traffic.libsyn.com/woofmeowshow/WoofMeowShow-2013-06-29-Vaccinations-2.mp3

Vaccinations– Non-Core Vaccines for Cats and Adverse Reactions to Vaccines with Dr. Ron Schultz (July 6th, 2013)http://traffic.libsyn.com/woofmeowshow/WoofMeowShow-2013-07-06-Vaccinations-3.mp3

Vaccinations – The Rabies Challenge Fund with Dr. Ron Schultz (July 13th, 2013)http://traffic.libsyn.com/woofmeowshow/WoofMeowShow-2013-07-13-Vaccinations-Rabies_Challenge_Fund.mp3

Podcast – Holistic and Complementary Wellness for Pets – Our Personal Journey — http://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2016/10/08/podcast-holistic-and-complementary-wellness-for-pets-our-personal-journey/

Veterinary Homeopathy – Part 1 with Dr. Judy Herman from the Animal Wellness Center in Augusta — http://traffic.libsyn.com/woofmeowshow/WoofMeowShow-2014-07-26-Veterinary_Homeopathy_Judy_Herman_Part-1.mp3

Veterinary Homeopathy – Part 2 with Dr. Judy Herman from the Animal Wellness Center in Augusta — http://traffic.libsyn.com/woofmeowshow/WoofMeowShow-2014-08-02-Veterinary_Homeopathy_Judy_Herman_Part-2.mp3

Veterinary Homeopathy – Part 3 with Dr. Judy Herman from the Animal Wellness Center in Augusta — http://traffic.libsyn.com/woofmeowshow/WoofMeowShow-2014-08-09-Veterinary_Homeopathy_Judy_Herman_Part-3.mp3

Holistic Veterinary Medicine and Homeopathy with Dr. Judy Herman from the Animal Wellness Center – part 1http://traffic.libsyn.com/woofmeowshow/WoofMeowShow-2011-09-17-Holistic_and_Homeopathy-part-1.mp3

Holistic Veterinary Medicine and Homeopathy with Dr. Judy Herman from the Animal Wellness Center – part 2 —http://traffic.libsyn.com/woofmeowshow/WoofMeowShow-2011-09-24-Holistic_and_Homeopathy-part-2.mp3

 

©22JUL17, Donald J. Hanson, All Rights Reserved
< Click for Copyright and Use Policy >

Podcast – A Holistic Approach to Vaccines for Dogs – Part 1 w/Dr. Judy Herman

< Click to Listen to Podcast >

In this episode of The Woof Meow Show from July 15th, 2017, Kate and Don talk with Dr. Judy Herman of the Animal Wellness Center in Augusta, Maine. In this show, we discuss what vaccines are and why vaccines are important for our pets. We discuss the different type of vaccines; modified live, killed, and recombinant and the differences between them and the infectious organisms they address; viruses versus bacteria. The Rabies Challenge Fund is discussed along with their latest research that indicates the Rabies vaccine is good for at least seven years. Chronic diseases that have been linked to over vaccinations are also addressed. Dr. Herman explains titer testing as an alternative to vaccinations for pets that have had reactions to vaccinations.

In the second segment of the show, Dr. Herman discusses which vaccines she recommends for puppies and older dogs starting off with an assessment of the dog’s health before she recommends anything. She stresses that it is imperative that a dog be healthy when vaccinated. The immunity puppies receive from their mother is also explained.

In the last segment of the show, we discuss the American Animal Hospital Associations (AAHA) recommended core vaccines; vaccines that the AAHA recommended for every dog. We also discuss the pros and cons of getting multiple vaccinations in a single shot or doing them singly at separate appointments. We consider dogs that are more likely to have an adverse reaction to a vaccine and some of the vaccine ingredients, like Mercury, that are suspected of causing adverse reactions. One reason why you want to ask your veterinarian about the specifics of the vaccines that they are using.

You can hear The Woof Meow Show on The Pulse AM620, WZON, and WKIT HD3 at 9 AM on Saturday. If you are not near a radio, listen on your computer at http://www.wzonthepulse.com or your smartphone or tablet with the free WZON 620 AM app. A podcast of the show is typically posted immediately after the show and can be downloaded at www.woofmeowshow.com and the Apple iTunes store.

< Click to Listen to Podcast >

To Contact Dr. Herman

Animal Wellness Center
95 Northern Avenue, Augusta, ME 04330

(207) 623-1177

Email: officeawc@roadrunner.com

Website:  http://www.judithhermandvm.com/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mainehomeopathicvet/

 Recommended Resources

Articles on Don’s Blog (http://www.words-woofs-meows.com)

Vaccinations–Interviews with Dr. Ron Schultzhttp://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2013/07/15/vaccinations-interviews-with-dr-ron-schultz/

How to Report Adverse Reactions to Vaccines, Drugs, Devices, Foods, and Flea and Tick Products – http://bit.ly/ReportAdverseReactions

Complementary Medicine – Tikken – Vaccines, Aggression & Homeopathy — http://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2014/10/06/complementary-medicine-tikken-vaccines-aggression-homeopathy/

 Shared Blog Post – It’s Time to Put a Stop to the Mindless Over-Vaccination of Petshttp://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2017/07/05/shared-blog-post-its-time-to-put-a-stop-to-the-mindless-over-vaccination-of-pets/

Podcasts from The Woof Meow Show (http://www.woofmeowshow.com)

Meet the Veterinarian with Dr. Judy Herman from the Animal Wellness Center — http://traffic.libsyn.com/woofmeowshow/WoofMeowShow-2014-07-12-Meet_the_Vet_Judy_Herman.mp3

Vaccinations- Why they are important, Core Vaccines & Vaccination Schedules w/Dr. Ronald Schultz (June 22nd, 2013) http://traffic.libsyn.com/woofmeowshow/WoofMeowShow-2013-06-22-Vaccinations-1.mp3

Vaccinations, Titer Testing, Non-Core Vaccines and Canine Infectious Respiratory Disease Complex with Dr. Ron Schultz (June 29th, 2013) http://traffic.libsyn.com/woofmeowshow/WoofMeowShow-2013-06-29-Vaccinations-2.mp3

Vaccinations- Non-Core Vaccines for Cats and Adverse Reactions to Vaccines with Dr. Ron Schultz (July 6th, 2013)http://traffic.libsyn.com/woofmeowshow/WoofMeowShow-2013-07-06-Vaccinations-3.mp3

Vaccinations – The Rabies Challenge Fund with Dr. Ron Schultz (July 13th, 2013)http://traffic.libsyn.com/woofmeowshow/WoofMeowShow-2013-07-13-Vaccinations-Rabies_Challenge_Fund.mp3

Podcast – Holistic and Complementary Wellness for Pets – Our Personal Journey — http://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2016/10/08/podcast-holistic-and-complementary-wellness-for-pets-our-personal-journey/

Veterinary Homeopathy – Part 1 with Dr. Judy Herman from the Animal Wellness Center in Augusta — http://traffic.libsyn.com/woofmeowshow/WoofMeowShow-2014-07-26-Veterinary_Homeopathy_Judy_Herman_Part-1.mp3

Veterinary Homeopathy – Part 2 with Dr. Judy Herman from the Animal Wellness Center in Augusta — http://traffic.libsyn.com/woofmeowshow/WoofMeowShow-2014-08-02-Veterinary_Homeopathy_Judy_Herman_Part-2.mp3

Veterinary Homeopathy – Part 3 with Dr. Judy Herman from the Animal Wellness Center in Augusta — http://traffic.libsyn.com/woofmeowshow/WoofMeowShow-2014-08-09-Veterinary_Homeopathy_Judy_Herman_Part-3.mp3

Holistic Veterinary Medicine and Homeopathy with Dr. Judy Herman from the Animal Wellness Center – part 1http://traffic.libsyn.com/woofmeowshow/WoofMeowShow-2011-09-17-Holistic_and_Homeopathy-part-1.mp3

Holistic Veterinary Medicine and Homeopathy with Dr. Judy Herman from the Animal Wellness Center – part 2 —http://traffic.libsyn.com/woofmeowshow/WoofMeowShow-2011-09-24-Holistic_and_Homeopathy-part-2.mp3

 

©15JUL17, Donald J. Hanson, All Rights Reserved
< Click for Copyright and Use Policy >

Dog Training – Teaching Your Puppy to Come When Called – Starting Points

We do not spend lots of time discussing recall in our Puppy Headstart class; there simply is not enough time in the four weeks we have. However, it is a critical behavior, and one most new puppy parents want to start teaching their puppy. A puppy usually stays pretty close to its new family the first few weeks, making it is easy to get a false sense of security, believing that your puppy has already mastered the recall behavior and will instantly come back to you in any situation. Based on twenty plus years as a professional dog trainer, I can tell you that this is extremely unlikely.

It is not my intention to scare you but to be honest with you. Your puppy will reach a point where they will be confident and ready to leave your side without warning. This urge to bolt often happens between twelve and sixteen weeks of age, roughly equivalent to humans becoming teenagers. The recall that you thought was perfect will no longer work. That is why I recommend that dogs be secured in fenced areas when they are off leash. I have had too many phone calls from students telling me that they wished they would have followed my advice because their puppy bolted into the road in front of a car and was seriously injured or killed.

Below I describe how you can start building a reliable recall with a game called puppy ping pong. This is something that you can start doing immediately. However, pleased understand that having a recall that can save your dog’s life takes lots of practice. In my experience, very few dogs are at that point before they are twelve to eighteen months of age.  Some dogs, despite working with incredible trainers, never reach the point where they can be safe off leash in non-fenced areas.

OBJECTIVE: To teach your dog to immediately come to you in any circumstance, when given a single visual or verbal cue.

“Come” is the most important cue your puppy/dog needs to know. It means, “Come to me without any hesitation or wandering.” It is a behavior which may save your dog’s life. It takes many months of training and thousands of repetitions before you will have a dog that comes reliably. Even if you think your three-month-old puppy knows to come when called, do not be surprised as this changes when the dog becomes older and begins to explore the world. Training a reliable recall takes time and patience.

Recall Rules

  1. NEVER scold or punish your dog after he has come to you. Your recall cue must be the most positive word that your dog hears and should never be associated with anything negative. (Remember, think like a dog. Coming to you must not be negative from his point of view. For example, asking your dog to come when they are playing outside and then putting him in his kennel or calling your dog to you and then trimming their nails will be considered to be negative for most dogs.
  2. ALWAYS praise and reward your dog for coming to you, even if you did not ask them to come.
  3. While training the recall, do not use the cue you are training unless you are 100% sure that your dog will come to you. You do not want to give your dog the opportunity to ignore this cue. Until the dog knows this cue, just go and get him when required, rewarding him for being “captured.”
  4. ALWAYS use a pleasant tone of voice when asking your dog to come. If you sound angry, your dog is not going to want to come to you. Many times I hear people start with a very friendly “COME” and then when the dog does not come, follow it up with a harsher sounding “COME.” They have made two mistakes; they have not adequately trained their dog to come on the first cue, and they have said it negatively, which decreases the probability of the desired behavior.
  5. ALWAYS use “dog-friendly” body language when asking your dog to come. Standing or kneeling with your arms open and outstretched and leaning back is very inviting for most dogs. Even the slightest lean forward by you can be seen as confrontational by your dog.
  6. Even after you dog has been trained to respond to a verbal cue for recall, ALWAYS make sure you have your dog’s attention before telling them to come
  7. Only say your verbal cue once and only after you have your dog’s attention. Saying it several times just reinforces that the dog does not have to come the first time, and the verbal cue you are using for recall becomes irrelevant.
  8. If after training to your dog to 99% reliability and they do not come, go and get him, praise him AND reward him with a treat! If you yell at him, you have just taught him that “getting caught” results in punishment. Also, understand that you need to do some more training.
  9. Do not overuse the cue “come.” Allow this word to remain meaningful.
  10. Get your dog used to being handled by their collar when they come to you. This is usually the only thing you will be able to use to restrain your dog. Dogs that are not given positive reinforcement for allowing us to handle them by their collars frequently become collar shy.
  11. Do not always tell your dog to come after he has been placed on a stay. You do not want your dog to lose his stay position because he is anticipating your next cue.

What If My Dog Does Not Come When Called?

No matter how well you train your dog, there may be some times when your dog does not come. If this happens, there are two things you can do:

If the dog is running away

  • Throw your arms up, scream and run away from your dog. Most of the time the dog will come quickly after you. When your dog arrives get control of him, praise him lavishly and give him a jackpot of treats.

If the dog is not coming to you

  • Crouch or lie down on the ground and start whispering to the ground as if you have just found something incredibly wonderful. Your dog will probably come over to investigate. When he does, place your hand on your dog’s collar, praise him lavishly and give him a handful of treats.

Exercises to Build A Strong Recall

Puppy Ping-Pong

  1. Start with two or more people at opposite ends of a long hall or room. Each needs a clicker and some treats. We recommend you always use a high-value treat, such as freeze dried liver for training the recall and recommend that you only use this high-value treat for the recall. A group of people sitting in a circle also works.
  2. The first person crouches or kneels, leans back, and says the dog’s name.

NOTE: Dogs respond positively to reduced body posture, which is why we crouch or kneel. Do NOT bend over at the waist, as this is a threatening position to the dog.

  1. Get the dog’s attention by clapping your hands, making squeaky noises, whatever is necessary to get your dog to come and investigate. If necessary run up to the dog quickly then quickly run backwards, praising your dog as he comes towards you.
  2. As the dog starts coming towards you, praise him lavishly “Good Dog!” “Good Job!” Many people make the mistake of waiting to praise the dog until he has arrived. We want to reward the actual act of coming towards you.
  3. When the dog is in front of you, put your fingers on the dog’s collar and click and treat with a high-value reward, such as freeze-dried liver. It is imperative that you grasp the collar, so your dog associates this as being a good thing. The first few times he comes, praise him for a good 15 seconds, making a big deal about how wonderful he was to come to you.
  4. Repeat the above steps, having the other person call the dog.
  • When the dog starts to automatically return to the other person after the click and treat, you are ready to play this game in another location.
  • As the dog gets proficient at this, fade the hand clapping and noises.
  • When the dog is consistently coming, you are ready to play the next game.

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Podcast – Listener Questions No. 27

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Kate and Don answer several listener submitted questions on topics such as: what to do about dogs that get anxious in the car, grooming for senior cats, how to define the relationship between our dog and ourselves, how to deal with cats that have stopped eating in a particular room, requirements for boarding a dog at Green Acres, equipment used to teach a dog to walk politely, and the appropriateness of fish in a cat’s diet.

You can hear The Woof Meow Show on The Pulse AM620, WZON, and WKIT HD3 at 9 AM on Saturday. If you are not near a radio, listen on your computer at http://www.wzonthepulse.com or your smartphone or tablet with the free WZON 620 AM app. A podcast of the show is typically posted immediately after the show and can be downloaded at www.woofmeowshow.com and the Apple iTunes store.

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Recommended Resources

Articles on Don’s Blog (http://www.words-woofs-meows.com)

Dog Training – How Do I Get My Dog to Walk Politely Instead of Pulling on the Leash?http://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2017/04/27/dog-training-how-do-i-get-my-dog-to-walk-politely-instead-of-pulling-on-the-leash/

 

©8JUL17, Donald J. Hanson, All Rights Reserved
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How to Report Adverse Reactions to Vaccines, Drugs, Devices, Foods, and Flea and Tick Products

If your pet has an adverse reaction to a vaccine, a drug, a device, food or treat, or a flea or tick control product, you need to report that adverse reaction to your veterinarian and the appropriate government agency. By doing so, you may prevent another pet from a serious illness or death.

The following links will help you to do so. Thank you!

USDA – Vaccines – Adverse Event Reportinghttps://www.aphis.usda.gov/aphis/ourfocus/animalhealth/veterinary-biologics/adverse-event-reporting/ct_vb_adverse_event

FDA – How to Report Animal Drug Side Effects and Product Problemshttps://www.fda.gov/animalveterinary/safetyhealth/reportaproblem/ucm055305.htm

EPA – Flea and Tick Control Products – Pesticide Poisoning in Petshttp://npic.orst.edu/health/petpoison.html

FDA – Pet Food – How to Report Product Problems and Complaints to the FDAhttps://www.fda.gov/ForConsumers/ConsumerUpdates/ucm095859.htm

 

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Shared Blog Post – It’s Time to Put a Stop to the Mindless Over-Vaccination of Pets

Shared Blog Post – It’s Time to Put a Stop to the Mindless Over-Vaccination of Pets

In this June 25th post, veterinarian Dr. Karen Becker interviews Dr. John Robb, a Connecticut veterinarian who has become known worldwide for his fight against profiteering and over-vaccination in veterinary medicine. If you are concerned about over vaccination of your pet, shop at Pet Smart, use a Banfield Veterinary Clinic, or feed any pet food made by Mars/Waltham, you will want to watch this video or read this article. – http://healthypets.mercola.com/sites/healthypets/archive/2017/06/25/pets-over-vaccination.aspx

Recommended Resources

Articles on Don’s Blog (http://www.words-woofs-meows.com)

Vaccinations–Interviews with Dr. Ron Schultzhttp://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2013/07/15/vaccinations-interviews-with-dr-ron-schultz/

Complementary Medicine – Tikken – Vaccines, Aggression & Homeopathy — http://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2014/10/06/complementary-medicine-tikken-vaccines-aggression-homeopathy/

 Podcasts from The Woof Meow Show (http://www.woofmeowshow.com)

Vaccinations- Why they are important, Core Vaccines & Vaccination Schedules w/Dr. Ronald Schultz (June 22nd, 2013) http://traffic.libsyn.com/woofmeowshow/WoofMeowShow-2013-06-22-Vaccinations-1.mp3

Vaccinations, Titer Testing, Non-Core Vaccines and Canine Infectious Respiratory Disease Complex with Dr. Ron Schultz (June 29th, 2013) http://traffic.libsyn.com/woofmeowshow/WoofMeowShow-2013-06-29-Vaccinations-2.mp3

Vaccinations- Non-Core Vaccines for Cats and Adverse Reactions to Vaccines with Dr. Ron Schultz (July 6th, 2013)http://traffic.libsyn.com/woofmeowshow/WoofMeowShow-2013-07-06-Vaccinations-3.mp3

Vaccinations – The Rabies Challenge Fund with Dr. Ron Schultz (July 13th, 2013)http://traffic.libsyn.com/woofmeowshow/WoofMeowShow-2013-07-13-Vaccinations-Rabies_Challenge_Fund.mp3

 

©5JUL17, Donald J. Hanson, All Rights Reserved
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Podcast – Zignature Limited Ingredient Pet Food

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In this episode of The Woof Meow Show on June 17th, 2017, Kate and Don chat with Karen Shanahan and Matt Munzer from Pets Global, the company that developed Zignature dog food. Zignature is a line of limited ingredient, low glycemic foods ideal for dogs suffering from food allergies and tolerances or those that are overweight.

Topics covered include:

  • The origins of Zignature dog food.
  • Limited ingredient diets and why they are essential for many dogs that are allergic or intolerant to certain food ingredients, like chicken.
  • The premise behind Zignature – foods free of chicken, as well as grains and potato. These ingredients can cause allergies, yeast infections, and weight problems in many dogs.
  • Why meat is the first two ingredients in all Zignature foods which provide more protein and increased palatability.
  • Ingredients and Zignature’s commitment to sourcing what goes in their food from its most natural source. The non-meat ingredients used by Zignature vary from formula to formula. These ingredients include peas, chickpeas, sunflower oil, flaxseed, alfalfa meal, blueberries, carrots, and cranberries. We discuss how these ingredients are processed to ensure optimal bioavailability.
  • Why Zignature uses no chicken at all. Chicken is not used as a protein source nor as a source of fat. Chicken is not inherently a bad ingredient but is has been used extensively in pet food for decades and hence, some dogs have grown intolerant to it. Also, Zignature believes in truth in advertising. There are other pet foods that might be labeled as being “duck” or “venison, ” but they also include chicken.
  • Why Zignature is free of potatoes, tapioca, and grains. These ingredients often contribute to yeast (Candida) outbreaks in dogs, which can cause ear and skin issues.
  • Why sourcing of ingredients is important to Zignature. The quality of the ingredients determines the quality of the food. Some ingredients used in Zignature come from outside the USA because the USA is not always the best source for high-quality For a list of the benefits of the ingredients used in Zignature dog food, go to – http://zignature.com/?page_id=624&lang=en
  • Why Zignature does extensive testing on ingredients both before they are used and after the manufacture of the Zignature product. Testing is completed internally and by an outside independent laboratory before any product is shipped. They test to make sure the food contains the ingredients that it is supposed to contain, in the proper amounts, and that the food is not adulterated with any unacceptable ingredients.
  • Where Zignature’s dry formula food is manufactured. Zignature has contracted with Tuffy’s, the company behind NutriSource, PureVita and Natural Planet to manufacture their dry dog food. Tuffy’s is a family owned company in Minnesota that Green Acres knows and trusts.
  • Where Zignature’s canned formulas are manufactured. Zignature’s canned products are mad by Performance Pet, a certified organic facility located in South Dakota.
  • The importance of the Glycemic Index when selecting pet food ingredients. All food items consumed are broken down in the body. Carbohydrates are converted into fats and sugars. Foods higher on the glycemic index contain more sugar. Too many dogs are obese, and the incidence of diabetes in dogs is on the rise. Zignature selects ingredients that are lower on the Glycemic index, like peas and chickpeas. This helps combat obesity, diabetes, as well as the overproduction of yeast (Candida) which is responsible for ear and skin conditions and itchiness. Ingredients (white potato, brown rice, tapioca) used by many other companies are much higher on the glycemic index. This allows Zignature to be certified as a low glycemic dog food, which makes it an excellent choice for dogs that are overweight or diabetic.
  • Zignature’s novel approach to fiber content. Zignature products have higher amounts of fiber than many other dog foods, approximately 4.5 % to 6.5% fiber, on average, as compared to 4% in other foods. Zignature uses higher quality sources of fiber (alfalfa meal and flaxseed), as opposed to some food companies that use powdered cellulose (sawdust) or peanut hulls. The fiber in Zignature is beneficial for anal glands and acts like a fishermen’s net, clearing the colon of non-digested material, which keeps it out of the blood stream.
  • Zignature’s many adult formulas; Catfish, Duck, Kangaroo, Lamb, Pork, Salmon, Trout & Salmon, Whitefish, and Venison and how they make it easy for you to rotate your dog’s

FMIhttp://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2012/05/04/nutrition-why-rotating-diets-makes-sense/

  • The benefits of Kangaroo as a protein source.
  • Zignature’s canned foods and why they are gum-free. Zignature uses no carrageenan, guar gum, xanthan gum, or locust bean gum in their canned foods. These food additives, often used in canned pet food, can contribute to inflammation and irritable bowel disease.

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Recommended Resources

Articles on Don’s Blog (http://www.words-woofs-meows.com)

Pet Nutrition – Zignature Limited Ingredient Dog Food http://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2017/06/19/pet-nutrition-zignature-limited-ingredient-dog-food/

Pet Nutrition – What Should I Feed My Pet?http://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2017/06/04/pet-nutrition-what-should-i-feed-my-pet/

Pet Nutrition: Some Myths and Facts – Part 1 – My story with Gushttp://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2017/04/03/pet-nutrition-some-myths-and-facts-part-1-my-story-with-gus/

Pet Nutrition: Some Myths and Facts – Part 2 – In the Spring 2017 issue of Maine DOG Magazine, Coming here soon! –

Pet Nutrition: Some Myths and Facts – Part 3 – Look for this article in the Summer 2017 issue of Maine DOG Magazine, Coming here soon! –

 

Podcasts from The Woof Meow Show (http://www.woofmeowshow.com)

Podcast – Pet Nutrition with Dr. Richard Pattonhttp://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2016/04/03/podcast-pet-nutrition-with-dr-richard-patton/

Podcast – Pet Fooled – A Look Inside A Questionable Industry with Kohl Harringtonhttp://www.greenacreskennel.com/blog/2017/05/06/podcast-pet-fooled-a-look-inside-a-questionable-industry-with-kohl-harrington/

 

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